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View Full Version : Do you view Batman as an "anti-hero"?



Nonnie
11-12-2006, 09:18 PM
I guess by definition (a character that does heroic things but in an un-heroic fashion) he is but it doesn't really wash with me. I guess I see characters like The Punisher and Wolverine as more of the "anti-hero" mold.

spider-bug
11-12-2006, 09:25 PM
I think Batman is a character that can be viewed either way. He's not a goody two shoes, but I don't think he'd go on a merciless killing spree like the Punisher does most of the time.

andeparks
11-12-2006, 09:26 PM
Hell, no!

Anj

SCOURGE
11-12-2006, 09:27 PM
In the early days...yes, now...not so much...

batmanbooyah
11-12-2006, 09:27 PM
he's about 60 years old. what he is has been changed so often, that he can fit basically any mold you have out there for him.

The Human Target
11-12-2006, 09:27 PM
Batman isn't.

Wolverine isn't.

Punisher is sometimes.

Foolish Mortal
11-12-2006, 09:37 PM
A true 'Anti-Hero' doesn't go out of their way to help or protect people. They do it just because it fits into their own priorities and motivations.

Batman will often go out of his way to help and protect people, so he's not a true Anti-Hero in my opinion.

Ryan Elliott
11-12-2006, 09:50 PM
A true 'Anti-Hero' doesn't go out of their way to help or protect people. They do it just because it fits into their own priorities and motivations.

Batman will often go out of his way to help and protect people, so he's not a true Anti-Hero in my opinion.



Yes.

Dreg
11-13-2006, 05:44 AM
He's a pro-hero. The only thing that makes him look edgy and out of control is the fact that he hangs around Superman all day.

Race
11-13-2006, 06:43 AM
Only if being an anti-social control freak counts . . .

half guard
11-13-2006, 06:55 AM
batman is an asshole with access to lots of cool gadgets. whether that makes him an anti-hero or not, i don't know.

Gavin
11-13-2006, 03:35 PM
He's not an anti-hero, he's just paranoid.

Foolish Mortal
11-13-2006, 06:05 PM
He's not an anti-hero, he's just paranoid.
They're trying to tone that down now.

Brad N.
11-13-2006, 06:08 PM
no. Batman's antihero cred depends solely on who is writing him at any given time. By definition he would be a super hero and he has had that Clint Eastwood Punisher/Wolverine loner anti-hero thang before, but for the most part no. He's pretty clearly a "good guy" most of the time.

Ryan Elliott
11-13-2006, 06:15 PM
Yeah, Deadpool is an anti-hero. Batman's just a darker kind of hero.

Jerome Gibbons
11-13-2006, 06:17 PM
NO.

stevapalooza
11-13-2006, 06:58 PM
He's no anti-hero on the Superfriends, and I consider that the ultimate resource.

Mylazycat
11-13-2006, 07:02 PM
Wasn't batman fun and loveable at one time, in the '50's and '60's with Bat-Mite and the like?

Ryan Elliott
11-13-2006, 07:10 PM
Wasn't batman fun and loveable at one time, in the '50's and '60's with Bat-Mite and the like?



Yep. To be more "all-ages."

Brendan
11-14-2006, 12:21 AM
I guess by definition (a character that does heroic things but in an un-heroic fashion) he is but it doesn't really wash with me. I guess I see characters like The Punisher and Wolverine as more of the "anti-hero" mold.

None of the above. Batman, the Punisher, and Wolverine are all heroes.

Alex from A Clockwork Orange is an anti-hero.

stevapalooza
11-14-2006, 12:44 AM
None of the above. Batman, the Punisher, and Wolverine are all heroes.

Alex from A Clockwork Orange is an anti-hero.

I agree. People get thrown off by the "hero" part of anti-hero. But anti-heroes aren't really heroes at all. Not only do they not use heroic methods, they don't really have a heroic agenda. Wolverine and the Punisher may not use traditional heroic tactics, but at the end of the day they're still fighting bad guys. That's heroic. Real anti-heroes don't care about fighting bad guys or making the world a better place.

The Roman Candle
11-14-2006, 01:12 AM
No, because I actually know what an anti-hero is.

Oh, BURN on people who say yes!

Magnum V.I.
11-14-2006, 01:15 AM
In literature and film, an anti-hero has widely come to mean a fictional character who has some characteristics that are antithetical to those of the traditional hero. An anti-hero in today's books and films will perform acts generally deemed "heroic," but will do so with methods, manners, or intentions that may not be heroic. The actual use of the word, however, is fairly recent, and its primary meaning has somewhat changed. As recently as 1940, the 600,000-word Merriam-Webster New International Dictionary, Second Edition, listed it but without a definition. By 1992 the American Heritage Dictionary of the American Language defined an anti-hero only as "a main character in a dramatic or narrative work who is characterized by a lack of traditional heroic qualities, such as idealism or courage," not as a person who nevertheless performs heroic acts. Even the more recent Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 11th Edition, of 2004, says: "(1714): a protagonist or notable figure who is conspicuously lacking in heroic qualities." The original meaning, therefore, is that of a protagonist who is ineffectual and hapless, rather than resolute and determined, whether his motives are good or bad. In some instances, anti-hero has come to refer to a protagonist of a work whose actions and motives are villainous or questionable.

Thus, anti-heroes can be awkward, antisocial, alienated, cruel, obnoxious, passive, pitiful, obtuse, or just ordinary. When the anti-hero is a central character in a work of fiction the work will frequently deal with the effect their flawed character has on them and those they meet along the narrative. In other words, an anti-hero is a protagonist that lives by the guidance of their own moral compass, striving to define and construe their own values as opposed to those recognized by the society in which they live. Additionally, the work may depict how their character alters over time, either leading to punishment, un-heroic success, or redemption.



Ok, So Now we know, and Knowing is half the battle.

RickLM
11-14-2006, 01:24 AM
He's more of a jerk than he used to be. Not sure if that makes him an anti-hero, though.

Hate_Prime
11-14-2006, 01:46 AM
Tony Soprano is an anti-hero. Batman is in no way an anti-hero; not even DK2 Batman.

Brendan
11-14-2006, 08:36 AM
Tony Soprano is an anti-hero.

Another good example. True!

Jules from Pulp Fiction also comes to mind. As does pretty much the entire cast of Reservoir Dogs.

There's also the main character from American Psycho, whose name I can't remember.

But Batman an anti-hero? Nah. Not even a little. Being an anti-hero means more than just being broody and brutal.