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View Full Version : who do u think the best american director is?



HCMarvel
11-11-2006, 07:54 PM
england: hitchcock
japan: kurosawa
France: truffaut (?)
Italy: Fellini
Germany: Lang
USA: ?

Patton
11-11-2006, 07:59 PM
I say Spielberg. He's a bit mainstream at times, but then think of movies like Amistad, and Schindler's List, etc...where he went off the beaten path.

sonnylarue
11-11-2006, 08:01 PM
John Ford, who could do it all

Donal DeLay
11-11-2006, 08:03 PM
George Lucas.

RickLM
11-11-2006, 08:12 PM
Martin Scorsese

Akira
11-11-2006, 08:20 PM
Welles.

stevapalooza
11-11-2006, 09:47 PM
probably Scorsese.

Brad N.
11-11-2006, 09:48 PM
Martin Scorsese

Yes. I would agree.

batmanbooyah
11-11-2006, 09:54 PM
whoever directed coming to america. that is one fucking funny movie!

Ryan_ZOOM_Turner
11-11-2006, 10:25 PM
Either Scorsese or Allen.

Bill?
11-11-2006, 10:27 PM
is uwe boll american? maybe he's just the best in the world.

redsplitwig
11-12-2006, 12:00 AM
cohen bros. or clint eastwood. uniquely american.

andeparks
11-12-2006, 12:31 AM
All time, I'll take John Ford. Living, I'm down with Scorsese.

I love Orson Welles like crazy, but he didn't make enough American films for me to call him the greatest. Ford, by the way, was Orson's favorite American director. He watched Stagecoach a dozen times or so early on in the shooting of Kane... it's how he learned a lot of the storytelling stuff that is unique to film.

Anj

Shepherd
11-12-2006, 12:47 AM
I say Cohen Bros only because they have a uniquely American vision without being too pretentious about it. Of course, Scorsese, Allen, and Welles are up there.

R

Hate_Prime
11-12-2006, 01:44 AM
Tarantino. Patentently american tastes and perspective (even with Kill Bill) and a damn fine director.

Caley Tibbittz
11-12-2006, 01:48 AM
I dunno. I like Whedon, Frakes, and Spielberg.

sonnylarue
11-12-2006, 05:34 AM
All time, I'll take John Ford. Living, I'm down with Scorsese.

I love Orson Welles like crazy, but he didn't make enough American films for me to call him the greatest. Ford, by the way, was Orson's favorite American director. He watched Stagecoach a dozen times or so early on in the shooting of Kane... it's how he learned a lot of the storytelling stuff that is unique to film.

Anj

Anj is my co-pilot. :)

Assuming you meant all-time, it's Ford, as for the current great, it's scorsese.

DaveCummings
11-12-2006, 06:00 AM
Martin Scorsese
Orson Welles
Quentin Tarantino
the Wachowski Bros. (forget what you think about the actual story of the sequels and think about how the movies were shot)
The Cohen bros.

~Dave

Mr. E!
11-12-2006, 06:01 AM
Established: Big Marty
Up and comming: Anderson

YouStayClassy
11-12-2006, 06:09 AM
whoever directed coming to america. that is one fucking funny movie!

:rofl:

Damn that is funny.

Fourthman
11-12-2006, 06:10 AM
Kubrick

Hate_Prime
11-12-2006, 06:15 AM
Kubrick


Damn I forgot about him. Good one.

Mr. E!
11-12-2006, 06:52 AM
Kubrick

Did he ever renounce his US citizenship? He moved to England in '62...

Mister Mets
11-12-2006, 07:17 AM
I've gotta go with Spielberg- I don't think anyone's made as many great movies.
And I've still gotta see Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Jurassic Park, and Schindler's List. But Jaws, Munich, ET, and the Indiana Jones trilogy are enough for me to make this declaration.

There are of course other great American directors (Scorcese, Tarantino, Eastwood, Coppola (for the first two Godfather movies & Apocalypse Now alone), Welles, Billy Wilder, Frank Capra, and Stanley Kubrick.)


england: hitchcock
japan: kurosawa
France: truffaut (?)
Italy: Fellini
Germany: Lang
USA: ?
While Fellini's a great director, I think Sergio Leone is legitimate competition for best Italian director.

And Herzog may have topped Lang as the best German director.

Mister Mets
11-12-2006, 07:18 AM
Did he ever renounce his US citizenship? He moved to England in '62...

He was still born in the US.


Anj is my co-pilot. :)

Assuming you meant all-time, it's Ford, as for the current great, it's scorsese.
The initial post had Lang representing Germany, so I think it is all time.


All time, I'll take John Ford. Living, I'm down with Scorsese.

I love Orson Welles like crazy, but he didn't make enough American films for me to call him the greatest. Ford, by the way, was Orson's favorite American director. He watched Stagecoach a dozen times or so early on in the shooting of Kane... it's how he learned a lot of the storytelling stuff that is unique to film.

Anj
I'm disappointed I forgot about John Ford.
Definitely one of the greatest American directors, but I do think Spielberg topped him.

costello
11-12-2006, 07:26 AM
is uwe boll american? maybe he's just the best in the world.

Bastard. You beat me to it.

costello
11-12-2006, 07:38 AM
Ralph Bakshi

LazyComix
11-12-2006, 08:39 AM
Just saw "The Departed" so I'm going with Scorsese... Kubrick is the closest to him... Spielberg, Tarantino as well.

If there's another vote for Whedon I'm putting my head through the monitor. :)

HCMarvel
11-12-2006, 08:59 AM
Spielberg is a very very entertaining director- but as far as masterpieces? He has raiders, jaws, and schindler's list. private ryan is close, e.t. is close. i dunno, i don't feel comfortable putting him with those others i listed. I think scorsese might be my pick. Or ford.

I think billy wilder was not born in america, am i right about that?

And i think Lang is still better than Herzog.

Jacob Lyon Goddard
11-12-2006, 10:52 AM
Robert Altman
Mike Nichols

THWIP!
11-12-2006, 11:47 AM
Kubrick
Tarantino
Scorsese
Hawks

Akira
11-12-2006, 11:52 AM
I'm not sure what people mean by making "American" movies with "American visions" as qualifications for being an American director. If the director was born in and primarily worked in America, shouldn't that be enough to qualify them as an American director? :-?

TonyFleecs
11-12-2006, 12:25 PM
I dunno. I like Whedon, Frakes, and Spielberg.
Correct.

Those are the three greatest american filmmakers of all time.

Hollingsworth
11-12-2006, 12:35 PM
Frakes? From Trek? What the hell are you guys smoking?

Kubrick for me.....

monkeyboy
11-12-2006, 12:40 PM
Tarrantino
Rodrigez
Zombie
Lucas (in the 70's and 80's)
Spielberg (again, in the 70's and 80's)
Coppola (Sophia not Francis Ford)
Burton
Meyer

TonyFleecs
11-12-2006, 01:09 PM
Frakes? From Trek? What the hell are you guys smoking?

Kubrick for me.....
I was doing the smarmy sarcasm thing... It's hard to read it that way when I don't use the emoticons.

Akira
11-12-2006, 01:19 PM
Tarrantino
Rodrigez
Zombie
Lucas (in the 70's and 80's)
Spielberg (again, in the 70's and 80's)
Coppola (Sophia not Francis Ford)
Burton
Meyer

Dude. Two movies...:no:

SCOURGE
11-12-2006, 01:19 PM
For me it is really a toss up between Scorsese and Speilberg...

glk
11-12-2006, 01:46 PM
Oliver Stone.

SCOURGE
11-12-2006, 01:47 PM
Oliver Stone.

Are you serious? Please for the love of god tell me you are kidding...

glk
11-12-2006, 01:49 PM
Are you serious? Please for the love of god tell me you are kidding...

Uh...

JFK
Platoon
Nixon
Born on the 4th of July
Wall Street

Why?

James Patrick
11-12-2006, 02:05 PM
It's not like other countries who have singe directors who separated themselves. American film is so rich and there are so many it becomes a different animal. But, if I had to pick one . . . I couldn't .. it'd be a tie between Steven and Marty.

Then there's Welles, Tarantino, Ford, Stone, and Coppala, and Allen.

Blake Sims
11-12-2006, 02:13 PM
Tarantino, Scorcesse, Allen, and Kubrick come to mind. Two of my own personal favorites are the Andersons (Wes and PT).

Freeway
11-12-2006, 02:36 PM
Scorsese.

Hollingsworth
11-12-2006, 02:40 PM
I was doing the smarmy sarcasm thing... It's hard to read it that way when I don't use the emoticons.

Yeah, but yours was not the first post, right? You were quoting someone who listed Whedon and Frakes.

TonyFleecs
11-12-2006, 02:55 PM
Yeah, but yours was not the first post, right? You were quoting someone who listed Whedon and Frakes.Yeah, he was serious.

Edit- Also, I wasn't busting on him to be a dick... I was just kind of shocked. That's like saying the best american comic artist is a toss up between Jack Kirby, Bendis on his Deep Space 9 adaption & Me (who's only done one thing that nobody saw).

TonyFleecs
11-12-2006, 03:39 PM
I think Scorsese's my pick too. The guy can do anything & do it great.

I dig Tarantino & PT Anderson a lot but they're both great in that they recognize what's great about other things and can figure out how to sharpen them & make them hit really hard. That's pretty abstract but you get what I'm saying.

Woody's amazing when he's on and decent when he's not on.

Welles is like the John Cazalle of directors, he did like 5 and came through every time.

Hitchcock's amazing but he didn't branch out much. He was comfortable in his genere and stayed there to master it.

I would've put Michael Mann in the running last year.... Before Miami Vice the guy had never let me down. But sort of like Hitchcock he mostly sticks to one kind of film (Insider being the big exception).