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BrianS
11-08-2006, 04:41 AM
A Loud Message for Bush (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/08/us/politics/08assess.html?ei=5094&en=654cbccf9b779806&hp=&ex=1163048400&adxnnl=1&partner=homepage&adxnnlx=1162993081-dSHqhibRGpjt/JUZt5LwCw)

Everything is different now for President Bush. The era of one-party Republican rule in Washington ended with a crash in yesterday’s midterm elections, putting a proudly unyielding president on notice that the voters want change, especially on the war in Iraq.

Mr. Bush now confronts the first Democratic majority in the House in 12 years and a significantly bigger Democratic caucus in the Senate that were largely elected on the promise to act as a strong check on his administration. Almost any major initiative in his final two years in office will now, like it or not, have to be bipartisan to some degree.

For six years, Mr. Bush has often governed, and almost always campaigned, with his attention focused on his conservative base. But yesterday’s voting showed the limits of those politics, as practiced — and many thought perfected — by Mr. Bush and his chief political adviser, Karl Rove.

In the bellwether states of Ohio and Pennsylvania, two Republican senators, both members of the legendary freshman class of 1994, were defeated by large margins. Across the Northeast, Republican moderates were barely surviving or, like Senator Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island, falling to Democrats who had argued that they were simply too close to a conservative president.

Most critically, perhaps, Republicans lost the political center on the Iraq war, according to national exit polls. Voters who identified themselves as independents broke strongly for the Democrats, the exit polls showed, as did those who described themselves as moderates.

Senator Olympia J. Snowe, a Maine Republican who was re-elected yesterday, said that with the election’s results, the administration’s Iraq policy “has to change.”

“It absolutely has to change,” Ms. Snowe said. “And that message should have been conveyed by the administration much sooner.”

Mr. Bush’s allies could argue that history was working against Republicans, that in a president’s sixth year in office, his party was ripe for big losses. They could also argue that Congressional Republicans brought their own vulnerabilities and scandals to the table. But this was a nationalized election, and Mr. Bush and Iraq were at the center of it.

Nearly 4 in 10 voters said they saw their ballot as a vote against Mr. Bush, about twice as many as those who said they had cast their ballots for him. It was a remarkable turnaround for a president who just two years ago emerged triumphant from his re-election campaign, declaring that he had earned political capital and intended to spend it.

That capital slowly drained away with an ill-fated fight on Social Security, a furor over the government’s mishandling of Hurricane Katrina, an aggressive intervention for conservative causes like the right-to-die case of Terri Schiavo, and, more than anything, pollsters said, the war in Iraq. In the final days of the campaign, Mr. Bush’s travels to some of the most Republican and least competitive regions in the country were a portrait of his political isolation.

Geoffrey Garin, a Democratic pollster, said, “An important feature of this election, with implications for 2008, is that the center of the electorate clearly doesn’t like to be ignored in an era of base politics. The Republicans played to the base at their great peril among the middle.”

After a campaign that only escalated the tension between Mr. Bush and Congressional Democrats, the president will now face overwhelming pressure to take a more conciliatory approach. For example, he will be under increasing pressure to re-evaluate his support for Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, which he so publicly restated in the closing days of the campaign.

Bruce Buchanan, a political scientist at the University of Texas at Austin, said Mr. Bush certainly had the capability to practice more bipartisan politics; he governed that way often in Texas, and also occasionally in Washington, on legislation like the No Child Left Behind Act.

Other analysts pointed out that on issues like energy and immigration, Mr. Bush can find common ground with many Democrats. Vin Weber, a former Republican congressman and lobbyist who is close to the administration, said, “They’ll be able to pivot quite easily on this and adapt to political reality.”

But much of Mr. Bush’s domestic agenda, which was not exactly gliding through the current Congress, will face even tougher prospects now. That includes any effort to overhaul entitlement programs like Social Security, already heavily shadowed by his failed effort to push through private investment accounts for Social Security in 2005, as well as any effort to extend all of his tax cuts, which Democrats say were heavily skewed to the most affluent.

Moreover, with a greater Democratic presence in the Senate, Mr. Bush will have far less latitude in his judicial nominees.

Even if Mr. Bush makes the grand gestures, Democrats heading into the 2008 presidential campaign may not be in the mood to reciprocate. Still, on Iraq, some change is almost inevitable, analysts say.

There is already a vehicle for a new bipartisanship, experts noted. A commission headed by James A. Baker III, former secretary of state, and Lee H. Hamilton, former Democratic representative from Indiana, is exploring policy alternatives for Iraq and is expected to make recommendations this winter.

House Democratic leaders have already indicated that they will not cut off financing for the war; in many ways, their greatest power will be their ability to investigate, hold hearings and provide the oversight that they asserted was so lacking in recent years.

Experts point out that Mr. Bush is hardly the first president to confront a House controlled by the opposition; since World War II, some form of divided government has been the norm. President Bill Clinton, through a combination of negotiation, brinksmanship and bluffs, produced major legislation with the Republican Congress after 1994, including an overhaul of the welfare system and a huge balanced budget law.

Mr. Bush could try to do the same. But first he would have to abandon the political worldview that he drew, by many accounts, from his father’s defeat — to never cross his base. President George H. W. Bush lost conservatives when he broke his “no new taxes pledge.”

The younger Bush has rarely made that mistake. His circle had clearly hoped that the conservative base would come through in the end, saving the Republican majority even in the face of an unpopular war. But this time, it was not enough.

BrianS
11-08-2006, 04:49 AM
Here comes 2008!

http://www.nydailynews.com/images/editors/home1108.jpg

WillieLee
11-08-2006, 05:04 AM
Hillary won't run.

KingMob
11-08-2006, 05:15 AM
Hillary won't run.

and if the was the dem nom she would never be voted into presidency

Ray G.
11-08-2006, 05:16 AM
and if the was the dem nom she would never be voted into presidency

She's going to run. She's banking on the GOP making a bad choice.

xyzzy
11-08-2006, 05:16 AM
She's going to run. She's banking on the GOP making a bad choice.

She's not going to run unless the numbers say she's going to win. She likes power and she's not stupid.

KingMob
11-08-2006, 05:18 AM
She's going to run. She's banking on the GOP making a bad choice.


I never said she wasnt going to run.

charlie
11-08-2006, 05:24 AM
She's not going to run unless the numbers say she's going to win. She likes power and she's not stupid.

Agreed. But I don't Hillary will poll well enough in battleground states. I hope she steps aside and a young, energetic Dem gets the nom. Paging Senator Obama...

WillieLee
11-08-2006, 05:28 AM
The Obama frenzy is a little ridiculous. What this election really means is two more years of BrianS cut and paste.

RickLM
11-08-2006, 05:29 AM
The loud message for Bush is that the country is sick of his war and his domestic policy, which is basically three things: Prescription Drug benefit, No Child Left Behind, big tax cut.

Shoulda governed better, bitch.

BrianS
11-08-2006, 07:02 AM
The loud message for Bush is that the country is sick of his war and his domestic policy, which is basically three things: Prescription Drug benefit, No Child Left Behind, big tax cut.

Shoulda governed better, bitch.

I love you...

Ryan Elliott
11-08-2006, 07:08 AM
The Obama frenzy is a little ridiculous. What this election really means is two more years of BrianS cut and paste.




I hope you handtype all the news articles from other sites that you post here.

Mylazycat
11-08-2006, 07:12 AM
I hope you handtype all the news articles from other sites that you post here.

http://www.forumspile.com/Owned/Owned-BadHair.jpg

Ryan Elliott
11-08-2006, 07:15 AM
http://www.forumspile.com/Owned/Owned-BadHair.jpg



That poor kid.


...


Heh.

Patrick J
11-08-2006, 07:16 AM
She's not going to run unless the numbers say she's going to win. She likes power and she's not stupid.

Yes, but she is in the unique position to run without risking the loss of her Senate seat. If nothing else, she will at least test the waters and throw her hat in the ring.

stevapalooza
11-08-2006, 08:05 AM
Americans are pretty moderate in the end and they never like seeing one group get too powerful. It was only a matter of time before the Republican monopoly on power was broken up. I think 9-11 was an x factor that made a lot of people wary. But That's wearing off now and people are coming back to their senses. Checks and balances!

BrianS
11-08-2006, 08:46 AM
The Obama frenzy is a little ridiculous. What this election really means is two more years of BrianS cut and paste.

Only two years? What happens to me in two years that causes me to stop?

:mistrust:

Blandy vs Terrorism
11-08-2006, 08:53 AM
Only two years? What happens to me in two years that causes me to stop?

:mistrust:

Bush is out of office, and your main reason for being on the board is gone. :p

BrianS
11-08-2006, 08:54 AM
PS - Montana just went Dem....Senate now 50-50!!

TheTravis!
11-08-2006, 08:59 AM
The Obama frenzy is a little ridiculous. What this election really means is two more years of BrianS cut and paste.

You could ask the guy with the gun to your head if it's okay for you to stop reading them.

Ryan Elliott
11-08-2006, 09:02 AM
You could ask the guy with the gun to your head if it's okay for you to stop reading them.




I wish I had the "Oh Snap!!11!!" GIF that McGeyser posted a while back. :lol:

TheTravis!
11-08-2006, 09:03 AM
I wish I had the "Oh Snap!!11!!" GIF that McGeyser posted a while back. :lol:

I'm shit sick of seeing people who spout their own total bullshit criticizing someone who posts actual information from other sources.

Foolish Mortal
11-08-2006, 09:04 AM
I wonder how Bush will spin this as NOT a message to him.

Ryan Elliott
11-08-2006, 09:05 AM
I'm shit sick of seeing people who spout their own total bullshit criticizing someone who posts actual information from other sources.


Agreed.


That's two "pwned" moments so far.



Think anyone will try for a third?

Blandy vs Terrorism
11-08-2006, 09:05 AM
I wish I had the "Oh Snap!!11!!" GIF that McGeyser posted a while back. :lol:

This one?

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y142/djblandy/11248068178487fm.gif

TheTravis!
11-08-2006, 09:06 AM
This one?

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y142/djblandy/11248068178487fm.gif

That makes me peelaugh.

Brad N.
11-08-2006, 09:06 AM
Agreed.


That's two "pwned" moments so far.



Think anyone will try for a third?

Bane totally kicked your ass that one time!!!

Awwwwwww Shiyat!

Pwned.

SethInAz
11-08-2006, 09:23 AM
You could ask the guy with the gun to your head if it's okay for you to stop reading them.

It's kinda ridiculous having to sift through 4 Republicans are in Deep Shit threads, 4 Donald Rumsfeld threads, one Fuck Joe Lieberman thread, a loud message for Bush thread, an elections stuff on MSNBC thread, a racism in TN thread, 2 Barack Obama threads, a Bush disappointed on losses thread, an election predictions thread, all on the first two pages just to find some news about comics.

People take issue because the manner things are cut/pasted is done in a cynical, hateful, spiteful manner that would result in banning if it were posted about a comic creator.

Of course this could be easily taken care of by sub forums, but what do I know.

TheTravis!
11-08-2006, 09:27 AM
It's kinda ridiculous having to sift through 4 Republicans are in Deep Shit threads, 4 Donald Rumsfeld threads, one Fuck Joe Lieberman thread, a loud message for Bush thread, an elections stuff on MSNBC thread, a racism in TN thread, 2 Barack Obama threads, a Bush disappointed on losses thread, an election predictions thread, all on the first two pages just to find some news about comics.

Yeah. It's a bummer that this is a public forum where people discuss LOTS of things. And an even bigger problem that some people can't handle the heady responsibility of skimming a few thread titles to find the topics that interest them.

dEnny!
11-08-2006, 09:28 AM
Yeah. It's a bummer that this is a public forum where people discuss LOTS of things. And an even bigger problem that some people can't handle the heady responsibility of skimming a few thread titles to find the topics that interest them.


I think we can agree this is a common complaint regarding lots of topics; politics, religion, comics, movies, pop culture, from a small few. I like the way the board is and if I see threads that are similar I have no problem merging them.

Dreg
11-08-2006, 09:28 AM
People take issue because the manner things are cut/pasted is done in a cynical, hateful, spiteful manner that would result in banning if it were posted about a comic creator.

So then wouldn't it be the subsequent editorials that are more irksome than the cut and pasting?

Also, I declare Cuttenpaster to be the new Cuttenrunner.

Foolish Mortal
11-08-2006, 09:28 AM
Yeah. It's a bummer that this is a public forum where people discuss LOTS of things. And an even bigger problem that some people can't handle the heady responsibility of skimming a few thread titles to find the topics that interest them.
Indeed. The Congress has just changed hands. This is a BIG story. And people want to talk a lot about big stories.

TheTravis!
11-08-2006, 09:29 AM
I think we can agree this is a common complaint regarding lots of topics; politics, religion, comics, movies, pop culture, from a small few. I like the way the board is and if I see threads that are similar I have no problem merging them.

Word.

SethInAz
11-08-2006, 09:30 AM
Yeah. It's a bummer that this is a public forum where people discuss LOTS of things. And an even bigger problem that some people can't handle the heady responsibility of skimming a few thread titles to find the topics that interest them.

These are all pretty much the same thing. Any other topic and the threads get consolidated by a mod.

xyzzy
11-08-2006, 09:32 AM
These are all pretty much the same thing. Any other topic and the threads get consolidated by a mod.


I'm all for consolidation, but a thread about Rumsfeld resigning and one about the pending VA senate race and another one about Political scandals aren't really the same topic.

SethInAz
11-08-2006, 09:32 AM
I think we can agree this is a common complaint regarding lots of topics; politics, religion, comics, movies, pop culture, from a small few. I like the way the board is and if I see threads that are similar I have no problem merging them.

You the man Denny! Merge away!

Foolish Mortal
11-08-2006, 09:32 AM
Wow! Bush made a funny joke!

dEnny!
11-08-2006, 09:33 AM
I'm all for consolidation, but a thread about Rumsfeld resigning and one about the pending VA senate race and another one about Political scandals aren't really the same topic.

Agreed.

SethInAz
11-08-2006, 09:33 AM
I'm all for consolidation, but a thread about Rumsfeld resigning and one about the pending VA senate race and another one about Political scandals aren't really the same topic.

but the 4 rummy threads, 4 repub threads?

Thorne
11-08-2006, 09:37 AM
Maybe people can suggest threads for moderators to merge in the future?

The Roman Candle
11-08-2006, 09:39 AM
PS - Montana just went Dem....Senate now 50-50!!

You mean 50-49, chief. Soon to be 51-49.


These are all pretty much the same thing. Any other topic and the threads get consolidated by a mod.

You're right, obviously Denny has a liberal bias.

Craig C
11-08-2006, 09:41 AM
Out of curiuosity what was the reaction of people like Rush Limbaugh to the results of the election? And who won the Governorship of Texas?

xyzzy
11-08-2006, 09:42 AM
but the 4 rummy threads, 4 repub threads?

Multiple threads about rumsfeld resigning, sure. Obviously those shoudl be consolidated.

BrianS's Republicans in Deep shit threads were all about different stories and they generally weren't active at the same time. I'd leave those alone.

Blandy vs Terrorism
11-08-2006, 09:42 AM
I think we can agree this is a common complaint regarding lots of topics; politics, religion, comics, movies, pop culture, from a small few. I like the way the board is and if I see threads that are similar I have no problem merging them.

*ding*

Foolish Mortal
11-08-2006, 09:44 AM
Out of curiuosity what was the reaction of people like Rush Limbaugh to the results of the election? And who won the Governorship of Texas?
Republican governor Rick Perry won re-election by a comfortable margin over Democrat Chris Bell.