PDA

View Full Version : Watching Stewart, why are people so close lipped about voting?



dEnny!
11-07-2006, 09:30 PM
I notice the older generation has always maintained you shouldn't discuss religion or politics, but that just seems silly to me.

What is the big deal about telling someone which way you are going to vote?

I'm just curious the possible reasons I'm not seeing? I relish the discussion, I want to know what other people think so I can obtain as much information as possible to see if I'm making the best decision.

Brad N.
11-07-2006, 09:32 PM
I know what you mean. My parents were the same way when I was a kid. It was a big secret for some reason.

RickLM
11-07-2006, 09:35 PM
My kids keep asking me, and I won't say it out loud, because I voted for the pro-choice candidate and my wife is steamed about that. Politics is so divisive it pisses me off. Sometimes its best just to vote and talk about the weather or sports.

dEnny!
11-07-2006, 09:36 PM
My kids keep asking me, and I won't say it out loud, because I voted for the pro-choice candidate and my wife is steamed about that. Politics is so divisive it pisses me off. Sometimes its best just to vote and talk about the weather or sports.

My wife votes the way I tell her. :p

(We actually have pretty similar political views...I'm actually the liberal one.)

Taxman
11-07-2006, 09:43 PM
People are just to touchy about politics these days. No matter which way you vote, there is alwasy a risk of offending someone.

dEnny!
11-07-2006, 09:48 PM
People are just to touchy about politics these days. No matter which way you vote, there is alwasy a risk of offending someone.

That's one reason I like this board. I can have, for the most part, really good conversations with people with different views than mine. There's a lady at work who is very liberal, but we can only go so far in our conversation because she gets so riled up, I mean she's shaking and angry. I just want to understand her views and see if I'm missing something. People have won me over and I've changed my vote.

Corwin: Bear Fighter
11-07-2006, 09:49 PM
I have a rule about not discussing politics at the dinner table when dining with people outside my immediate family (mom, dad, my girl). It's a good rule.

Brad N.
11-07-2006, 10:00 PM
That's one reason I like this board. I can have, for the most part, really good conversations with people with different views than mine. There's a lady at work who is very liberal, but we can only go so far in our conversation because she gets so riled up, I mean she's shaking and angry. I just want to understand her views and see if I'm missing something. People have won me over and I've changed my vote.

screw you buddy.








:grope:

Jumbopimp
11-07-2006, 10:06 PM
The rule used to be to not discuss politics and religion in polight company, meaning if you were having a dinner party or a friendly get together you didn't address those topics, because it could start an argument before people could find common ground.

This notion drifted into society as a cultural norm, when people started having more free time to meet. Today it just keeps us from talking about the issues and the things that are the most important to us.

J. Wilson
11-08-2006, 04:09 AM
I notice the older generation has always maintained you shouldn't discuss religion or politics, but that just seems silly to me.

What is the big deal about telling someone which way you are going to vote?

I'm just curious the possible reasons I'm not seeing? I relish the discussion, I want to know what other people think so I can obtain as much information as possible to see if I'm making the best decision.


They probably figure if they say who they are voting for, the Republican administration will put them on a watch list if a Democrat is who they are voting for.

The Cheap-Arse Film Critic
11-08-2006, 04:13 AM
I notice the older generation has always maintained you shouldn't discuss religion or politics...

And I agree with them.

dEnny!
11-08-2006, 04:19 AM
They probably figure if they say who they are voting for, the Republican administration will put them on a watch list if a Democrat is who they are voting for.

I've reported you to Homeland Security.

dEnny!
11-08-2006, 04:19 AM
And I agree with them.

Yeah, but you're English so you count as an old, stodgy fellow anyway.

The Cheap-Arse Film Critic
11-08-2006, 04:22 AM
Yeah, but you're English so you count as an old, stodgy fellow anyway.

It's for several reasons, actually...

1. I find that the people who have the most to say about either subject seem to actually know the least.

2. I could care less about either. I don't attend church, and don't plan on voting next time around.

3. I consider myself a Gentleman, and a gentleman discusses neither.

4. In the words of Talib Kweli, I'm just Old School like that.

I'd also like to see a cut back in political discussion here, but it's not my board.

Jacob Lyon Goddard
11-08-2006, 04:35 AM
i don't talk politics, because it's none of your business
and more often than not it devolves into people thinking that their vote is more important or more intitled than the other guy's

Drew
11-08-2006, 06:24 AM
Because back in the day, if you voted for the guy who wasn't backed by the machine, you would get your shit rocked.