PDA

View Full Version : Read, Not Dead: The Question



EdContradictory
03-22-2006, 08:12 AM
Read, Not Dead: The Question (http://www.yourmomsbasement.com/archives/2006/03/read_not_dead_t.html)


This column is about great comicbooks runs that deserve to be collected for more widespread future reading.

The Question. DC Comics, 1986.

36 Issues and 2 Annuals.

http://yourmomsbasement.com/images/ReadNotDead/TheQuestion4.jpg

Read, Not Dead: The Question (http://www.yourmomsbasement.com/archives/2006/03/read_not_dead_t.html)

artimoff
03-22-2006, 08:21 AM
The Question is one of the runs that I will NEVER get rid of.

mike black
03-22-2006, 08:51 AM
I cherish my entire run. I have the Quaterlies, but none of the annuals.

(Funny, I was just discussing the character somewhere else yesterday.)

Generic Poster
03-22-2006, 09:29 AM
Could not agree more. It kind of dropped off in quality towards the end, but still was better than 90% of what was (or is) being put out.

I also can't understand why DC never finished collecting Hitman.

wh park
03-22-2006, 10:03 AM
Me love The Question by Denny O'Neil and Denys Cowan. Aside from the great stories it had a great letters column to and the recommended reading list from Denny himself.

Brilliant series and a great character, I'm looking forward to seeing him in 52.

artimoff
03-22-2006, 10:14 AM
He was great in a recent JLU. Huntress calls him on his cell phone to talk. He is in some kind of secret werehouse surrounded by canisters (kinda like the ones on 24, the centox nerve gass conatiners). He asks Huntress to hold on for a sec as he opens one and says...

"Ahha! as I suspected: 32 flavors."


I nearly pissed my self.

Inferiority
03-22-2006, 10:26 AM
The Question is my favorite comic book character ever, and this is my favorite series. I'm missing a few issues though, unfortunately. I'm missing issues 22, 23, 24, 26 and 27. I also need the last Quarterly, #5, which I believe came out substantially later than the first four. I also have both annuals and the one-shot The Question Returns. The first annual in particular is really good. It's a beautiful story featuring Lady Shiva, Green Arrow and Batman as they help the O Sensei keep a promise he made to his wife many years ago.

I really love the entire run, although it does lose a bit of the sparkle towards the end. I love how, while there are individual arcs and stories, everything feels like one big connected story when all is said and done. I'm curious what the interpretation of the Question will be in 52. There's the original, objectivist Dikto version, the O'Neil Question who was more of a martial artist than a brawler and integrated zen buddhist ideas, or the JLU Question, a conspiracy theorist who's fighting style and other elements harken more back to the original without making him an Ayn Rander. I'm not even going to consider the recent Question miniseries because it was awful and a nonsensical interpretation. I'm betting on the JLU interpretation (which is fine by me) because I think his popularity on that show is what led to his inclusion in 52 in the first place. I just pray they don't kill him.


He was great in a recent JLU. Huntress calls him on his cell phone to talk. He is in some kind of secret werehouse surrounded by canisters (kinda like the ones on 24, the centox nerve gass conatiners). He asks Huntress to hold on for a sec as he opens one and says...

"Ahha! as I suspected: 32 flavors."


I nearly pissed my self.

Man, that line was hilarious, as are several of the Question's conspiracy theories. If you haven't seen it, look for the episode "Question Authority." I love the Question on JLU, and I'm really glad to see him used to effectively and to such a great extent. I would have never guessed the Question to be one of the most frequently featured B-listers on a show like JLU, but I was presently suprised when I began watching and kept seeing him pop up. I wonder if the Question/Huntress relationship (which actually originates in the Batman/Huntress: Cry for Blood miniseries but was taken to more prominence in JLU) will be reintroduced in the comic books.

mike black
03-22-2006, 10:26 AM
He was great in a recent JLU. Huntress calls him on his cell phone to talk. He is in some kind of secret werehouse surrounded by canisters (kinda like the ones on 24, the centox nerve gass conatiners). He asks Huntress to hold on for a sec as he opens one and says...

"Ahha! as I suspected: 32 flavors."


I nearly pissed my self.

Eh, he's a great character on JLU - but it's not really The Question, you know what I mean?

artimoff
03-22-2006, 10:27 AM
Eh, he's a great character on JLU - but it's not really The Question, you know what I mean?

He's more like the Ditko question.

mike black
03-22-2006, 10:30 AM
There's the original, objectivist Dikto version, the O'Neil Question who was more of a martial artist than a brawler and integrated zen buddhist ideas, or the JLU Question, a conspiracy theorist who's fighting style and other elements harken more back to the original without making him an Ayn Rander.

In the conversation I had yesterday, some guy started screaming that "It's Ditko's character!!! You can't write it any other way." And I'm sitting there thinking "Actually, it's DC's character - who Ditko used as a watered down version of one he owns. Mr. A."

This all came up at my mentioning that The Question (and Hub City,) would be great in a New Orleans type setting - with a more combat journalist feel. I'd go back and post my actual thoughts, but I suppose the thread's been deleted at this point.

mike black
03-22-2006, 10:31 AM
He's more like the Ditko question.

More like, yes, but I think he's still too much of a joke. You know?

Fun character, though.

Inferiority
03-22-2006, 12:53 PM
I think saying the Question has to be written as Ditko's version is a pretty ridiculous statement. Ditko's Question only appears in 6 back-up tales in Blue Beetle and an issue entitled Mysterious Suspence, to my knowledge. Maybe a few other Charlton appearances. O'Neil has put out much more, much higher quality work with his version of the Question. Not opposed to the Ditko version or anything, but I think through the various versions, the most recent showing up in JLU, it has been proven that the Question is a character open to different interpretations. This is the reason I'm really interested to see what four of the best writers out there do with him in the pages of 52. I think a good interpretation and something they might go with is a more serious version of the JLU Question (without the crazy/humorous conspiracy theories for example) that hopefully respects the O'Neil continuity.

I also think you're Hub City/New Orleans type idea would make for some great Sage stories.


More like, yes, but I think he's still too much of a joke. You know?

Fun character, though.

Yeah, the conspiracy thing makes him kind of silly, although I think some of that might be an act. He's proven very resourceful when he wants to be.