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PhilipClark
02-22-2006, 09:59 AM
I'm just curious about some of the other board members.

I'll start. "Clark" is from the scottish "O'cleric," which means scribe, cleric or priest.

My legal last name is "Berger," which is German for "man who stands on mountain."

If we go to the first name, "Philip" is greek for "friend of horses."

What does your name mean, if anything? I'm especially curious about Beranek, Loika and, of course, Bendis.

RøcketFrøg
02-22-2006, 10:01 AM
Mine, Pottle, is from an old English word (Potel) for a 2 qt drinking vessel.

Taki Soma
02-22-2006, 10:02 AM
Taki = waterfalls

Soma = a lone samurai horse in a forest (very old name, doesn't actually SAY that in Japanese, but that's the meaning behind it)

TIP
02-22-2006, 10:02 AM
Palermo...Italian for Plook.

T

AAlgar
02-22-2006, 10:02 AM
I haven't gotten as far as etymology yet. I'm just trying to figure out how to pronounce the thing.

RøcketFrøg
02-22-2006, 10:04 AM
I haven't gotten as far as etymology yet. I'm just trying to figure out how to pronounce the thing.
I've moved to the Carnegie campsite because of the Irish Setter.

Oops...sorry, wrong thread.

Victor Cabanelas
02-22-2006, 10:04 AM
"Cabanelas" is a small town in Spain.

However, I was told that it was derived from an old swedish word that meant "harpooner". Don´t know that for sure, though.

Cth
02-22-2006, 10:05 AM
According to this site:
http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=travis



Travis
Derived from Old French traverse meaning "to cross". From a surname which originally denoted someone who collected tolls from people crossing a bridge.


I've heard it also means "at the crossroads"

According to this site:
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Howard




Howard
proper name, from P.Gmc. *Hugihard "heart-brave," or *Hoh-weard "high warden."


P.Gmc. Proto-Germanic, hypothetical prehistoric ancestor of all Germanic languages, including English.

Olivier E.
02-22-2006, 10:08 AM
Estevao aka saint stephen in english:

Saint Stephen is the Protomartyr or first martyr of Christianity and is venerated as a saint of the Roman Catholic Church and its Eastern Rite, the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Church of England and its Anglican Communion among other religious denominations. He is identified as one of the first deacons chosen by the early church in Acts of the Apostles. The Feast of Saint Stephen is celebrated on December 26 in the Western Church and December 27 in the Eastern Church. Until 1955, a simple octave was also kept by the Roman Catholic Church in honor of this feast, with the Octave day on January 2. A second feast, the Invention of St. Stephen, was kept on August 3, commemorating the finding (Latin: inventio) of his body during the reign of Emperor Honorius.

Upon the death of Jesus, Stephen began to work hard to spread what was then called The Way. He preached the teachings of Jesus and participated in the conversion of Jews and Gentiles. Acts tells the story of how Stephen was tried by the Sanhedrin for blasphemy and was then stoned to death by an infuriated mob encouraged by Saul of Tarsus, the future Saint Paul [1].

Saint Stephen's name is simply derived from the Greek Stephanos, meaning "crown", which translated into Aramaic as Kelil. Saint Stephen is traditionally invested with a crown of martyrdom for Christianity and is often depicted in art with three stones and the martyrs' palm. In Eastern Christian iconography he is shown as a young beardless man with a tonsure, wearing deacon's vestments, and often holding a miniature church building and censer.

Sir Erudite Gav
02-22-2006, 10:08 AM
I've moved to the Carnegie campsite because of the Irish Setter.

Oops...sorry, wrong thread.

The thread hasn't changed! You... nevermind.




According to one of the etymology sites.... among the light-skinned English anyone with a darker complexion, brown hair, tendancy toward brown clothing, etc. were often described that way, and it stuck as a surname.

Ironic then that if I were any more white I'd be an x-ray.

Gregory
02-22-2006, 10:09 AM
Gregory

From the Latin Gregorius, which was from the late Greek name Γρηγοριος (Gregorios), which was derived from γρηγορος (gregoros) meaning "watchful, alert". This was the name of several saints including three Fathers of the Church: Saint Gregory Thaumaturgus (3rd century), Saint Gregory of Nyssa, and Saint Gregory of Nazianzus (both 4th century). This was also the name of 16 popes, including Gregory I, who was known as Gregory the Great.

Criden
02-22-2006, 10:10 AM
Criden, from the latin "to rock and roll with wanton abandon"

Victor Cabanelas
02-22-2006, 10:10 AM
Oh, and my first and middle name (Victor Emilio) mean: "The one who wins through work"

mattbrand
02-22-2006, 10:11 AM
I know Matthew means "gift from God".

Not sure what Brand means. English roots are obvious, branding with a hot iron kind of thing. But my last name comes from Germany.

Gunter
02-22-2006, 10:12 AM
Kevin:

Anglicized form of the Irish name Caoimhín, derived from the older Irish Coemgen, composed of the Old Irish elements coem "kind, gentle, handsome" and gein "birth". Saint Caoimhin established a monastery in Ireland and is the patron saint of Dublin


Gunter: (derived from Gunther)
Derived from the Germanic elements gund "war" and heri "army, warrior". In the Germanic legend the 'Nibelungenlied', Günther was a Burgundian king and the husband of the Icelandic queen Brunhild.

That pretty much sums me up. Kind, gentle, handsome, warrior.

Bill Nolan
02-22-2006, 10:14 AM
William - From the Germanic name Wilhelm, which was composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". The name was introduced to Britain by the Normans.

Nolan - From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Nuallain meaning "descendent of Nuallan". The name Nuallan means "champion" or "chariot fighter".

Interesting thread...

- B

SteveZegers
02-22-2006, 10:16 AM
No idea what Zegers means. We're pretty sure it's Dutch. (That side of the family moved to Ireland way before we have records. So we know that it's Dutch but not really anything else about it.)

Stephen means "Royal".

DrMachine
02-22-2006, 10:18 AM
last name is from a French village where my ancestors are from, my first name has hebrew origins but it's more recently Spanish

NickT
02-22-2006, 10:19 AM
Thompson means Son of Tom I believe.



Using Cth's link:

NICHOLAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: NI-ko-las (English), nee-ko-LA (French) [key]
Extra Info: Popularity, Related Names, Namesakes, Websites, Comments
Options: Contribute Information, Add to List
From the Greek name Νικολαος (Nikolaos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and λαος (laos) "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is also known as Santa Claus (from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, and Greece and Russia. Nicholas was also the name of two czars of Russia and five popes

That's me. People's champion, baby :)

Genius J
02-22-2006, 10:19 AM
I'm just curious about some of the other board members.

I'll start. "Clark" is from the scottish "O'cleric," which means scribe, cleric or priest.
My last name is "Clark", which is from the Scottish... oh.

AAlgar
02-22-2006, 10:20 AM
No idea what Zegers means. We're pretty sure it's Dutch. (That side of the family moved to Ireland way before we have records. So we know that it's Dutch but not really anything else about it.)

Stephen means "Royal".

How come nobody's name ever means "commoner"?

Wagon
02-22-2006, 10:21 AM
No idea what Zegers means. We're pretty sure it's Dutch. (That side of the family moved to Ireland way before we have records. So we know that it's Dutch but not really anything else about it.)

Stephen means "Royal".

Zegers, according to this site (http://surnames.behindthename.com/php/search.php?terms=segher), is a variation of the surname Segher, which was itself derived from the word Sieger, meaning "VIctorious Army" in Norse.

I was unable to find my own surname on that site, unfortunately... I think the second half of it means 'man', but I am not sure. My first name means "Gift from God", though...

Your Pal, Carl
02-22-2006, 10:21 AM
Giannini...Italian for...something...

CraigM
02-22-2006, 10:22 AM
Craig: Scottish - Means "crag" which is a rock. In other words, I'm a rock.

Maloof: Not found.

Craig

PhilipClark
02-22-2006, 10:22 AM
Interesting thread...
Thanks, I figured it'd be fun.

mattbrand
02-22-2006, 10:23 AM
this site (http://surnames.behindthename.com/php/search.php?terms=segher),

Cool. It looks like my last name, Brand is:

From the German first name Brand, derived from Old High German brant meaning "sword".

Genius J
02-22-2006, 10:23 AM
I always thought of "MALOOF" would make a good comic book sound effect, like when someone falls down.

AAlgar
02-22-2006, 10:24 AM
I always thought of "MALOOF" would make a good comic book sound effect, like when someone falls down.

I love turning people into sound effects. I've used FLONK! already.

PhilipClark
02-22-2006, 10:25 AM
I always thought of "MALOOF" would make a good comic book sound effect, like when someone falls down.
I'm using that someday. It'll be my EVS sex gimmick.

TIP
02-22-2006, 10:25 AM
I love turning people into sound effects. I've used FLONK! already.

:scared:

T

Sy-Klone
02-22-2006, 10:26 AM
MICHAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Czech, Biblical
Pronounced: MIE-kul [key]

From the Hebrew name Miyka'el which meant "who is like God?". This is the name of one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies, and thus is considered the patron saint of soldiers. This was also the name of nine Byzantine emperors and a czar of Russia.

My last name appears to mean "coward."

Hmm.

Angel. Coward.

That's not good, is it? :)

deadboy
02-22-2006, 10:26 AM
Ronald: masc. proper name, from O.N. Rögnvaldr "Having the Gods' Power," from rögn "gods," lit. "decreeing powers" (pl. of regin "decree") + valdr "ruler."

Fitzpatrick, at it's root, meas Son of Patrick

SteveZegers
02-22-2006, 10:27 AM
Zegers, according to this site (http://surnames.behindthename.com/php/search.php?terms=segher), is a variation of the surname Segher, which was itself derived from the word Sieger, meaning "VIctorious Army" in Norse.

I was unable to find my own surname on that site, unfortunately... I think the second half of it means 'man', but I am not sure. My first name means "Gift from God", though...
Victorious Army in Norse?! That's awesome!

SteveZegers
02-22-2006, 10:28 AM
How come nobody's name ever means "commoner"?
I guess no one wanted to name their kid "Piss Boy son of Manure Sifter"

MattJohnson
02-22-2006, 10:30 AM
I'll roll the dice on mine meaning Son of John.

wabi-sabi
02-22-2006, 10:31 AM
Smith: From the old english meaning "metalworker". In reality, it is an americanized version of "Schmidt", which means the same thing.

Brett: Variation of Breton, meaning "one who hails from Britain.

Criden
02-22-2006, 10:36 AM
I guess I don't have a real name!

AAlgar
02-22-2006, 10:37 AM
I guess no one wanted to name their kid "Piss Boy son of Manure Sifter"

Well, we both stand corrected. Now let's laugh at the coward.

Sy-Klone
02-22-2006, 10:42 AM
Well, we both stand corrected. Now let's laugh at the coward.

:-?

Hey...that's my last name. I didn't have a choice as far as that's concerned!

After all, "who is like God?" Michael, that's who. Damn straight. :p

TIP
02-22-2006, 10:42 AM
I guess no one wanted to name their kid "Piss Boy son of Manure Sifter"

Wait for the shake.

T

nrrdgrrl
02-22-2006, 10:44 AM
Jessica:
fem. proper name, from L.L. Jesca, from Gk. Ieskha, from Heb. Yiskah, name of a daughter of Haran [Gen. xi.29].
[/URL]

Marie:
fem. proper name, O.E. Maria, Marie, "mother of Jesus,"
[URL="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Mary"] (http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=jessica&searchmode=none)

Fleming:
O.E. Flæming "native or inhabitant of Flanders," from P.Gmc. *Flam- (cf. M.L. Flamingus).
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Fleming




Overall: meh. Although I remember looking up my last name in a book somewhere. Apparently some consider Fleming a Flemish name. Which amuses me to no end.

JABSEN
02-22-2006, 10:44 AM
I can't find Baez on any of those sites

AAlgar
02-22-2006, 10:44 AM
:-?

Hey...that's my last name. I didn't have a choice as far as that's concerned!

After all, "who is like God?" Michael, that's who. Damn straight. :p

COWARD! :lol:

TIP
02-22-2006, 10:45 AM
I can't find Baez on any of those sites

Doesn't that translate to "Former Dylan Squeeze"

T

Sy-Klone
02-22-2006, 10:46 AM
Incidentally, I'll just fess up and say that my last name is Cravens. "Craven" means coward. I tried like hell to find another meaning online.

Now don't any of you go stalking me! :)

AAlgar
02-22-2006, 10:48 AM
Incidentally, I'll just fess up and say that my last name is Cravens. "Craven" means coward. I tried like hell to find another meaning online.

Now don't any of you go stalking me! :)

Just say "from the Marvel Kraven, meaning hunter."

NickT
02-22-2006, 10:53 AM
Just say "from the Marvel Kraven, meaning hunter."
Dead hunter.

Niall
02-22-2006, 10:54 AM
My first name, Niall, is the old Irish form of the name Neil, which comes from the old Irish word for champion, then the Brits went and stole it and changed it to Nigel http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b337/nbg430/ire2.jpg
http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b337/nbg430/duel5.gif

MattJohnson
02-22-2006, 10:57 AM
My first name, Niall, is the old Irish form of the name Neil, which comes from the old Irish word for champion, then the Brits went and stole it and changed it to Nigel http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b337/nbg430/ire2.jpg
http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b337/nbg430/duel5.gif

dig the White Stripes spoiler

Niall
02-22-2006, 11:00 AM
dig the White Stripes spoiler

:-? I cant even pretend to know what you are talking about.

MattJohnson
02-22-2006, 11:07 AM
:-? I cant even pretend to know what you are talking about.
...

RebootedCorpse
02-22-2006, 11:10 AM
My first name "Barton" means keeper of the barley or the guy who made beer.

Natty P, Scientific Adventurer
02-22-2006, 11:10 AM
Nathaniel--
masc. proper name, from L.L. Nathanael, from Gk. Nathanael, from Heb. Nethan'el, lit. "God has given."


Purcell I can't find anything on, but I know that they were originally Normans named "Poicell" who came to Ireland after the Normans had invaded England, it later was "germanicized" into Purcell.

Niall
02-22-2006, 11:11 AM
...

ok, seriously, I'm confused :confused: Does this have something to do with the White stripes the band? does anyone know what this guy is talking about?

Nick Hale
02-22-2006, 11:21 AM
Having stolen Cth's links apparently
Nick/Nicholas means Victory/Victory for the People

and Hale has two listed

"healthy," O.E. hal "healthy" (see health). The Scottish and northern English form of whole, it was given a literary sense of "free from infirmity" (1734).

and

"drag, summon," c.1205, from O.Fr. haler "to pull, haul," from Frank. *halon or O.Du. halen, both from P.Gmc.; probably also from O.E. geholian "obtain" (see haul).

Seeing that according to my grandfather on my dads side, my family is mostly of German decent so i'm guessing it would be more the second than the first.

Niall
02-22-2006, 11:21 AM
Nathaniel--
masc. proper name, from L.L. Nathanael, from Gk. Nathanael, from Heb. Nethan'el, lit. "God has given."


Purcell I can't find anything on, but I know that they were originally Normans named "Poicell" who came to Ireland after the Normans had invaded England, it later was "germanicized" into Purcell.

http://search.swyrich.com/searchresults.asp?Licensee=22222&Surname=Purcell&z= does this help?

deadboy
02-22-2006, 11:23 AM
ok, seriously, I'm confused :confused: Does this have something to do with the White stripes the band? does anyone know what this guy is talking about?

Are you serious? Your sig line is from a White Stripes song.

Niall
02-22-2006, 11:29 AM
Are you serious? Your sig line is from a White Stripes song.

ohh... I thought it had something to do with that post, silly me:Oops:

MattJohnson
02-22-2006, 11:36 AM
ohh... I thought it had something to do with that post, silly me:Oops:

Sorry for the confusion, hombre.

Niall
02-22-2006, 11:46 AM
Sorry for the confusion, hombre.

It's ok, I just thought you were reading too far into my post

WinterRose
02-22-2006, 02:04 PM
WILLIAM
From the Germanic name Wilhelm, which was composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". The name was introduced to Britain by the Normans. It has belonged to several rulers of England, Prussia, and Germany, including William the Conqueror, the first Norman king of England. Another famous bearer was William Tell, a legendary 14th-century hero from Switzerland. In the literary world it has been borne by dramatist William Shakespeare and poet William Blake, as well as contemporary authors William Faulkner and William S. Burroughs.

EDWARD
Means "rich guard", derived from the Old English elements ead "rich, blessed" and weard "guard". Saint Edward the Confessor was the king of England shortly before the Norman Conquest. Because of his popularity this name remained in use after the conquest (most other Old English names were replaced by Norman ones), and was even the name of eight subsequent kings of England. Edward is also one of the few Old English names to be used throughout Europe.

GORE
c.1400, from Scottish gorren "to pierce, stab," origin unknown, perhaps related to O.E. gar "spear" (see gar), which is certainly the source of the third meaning of Mod.Eng. gore, "triangular piece of ground" (O.E. gara), hence also "front of a skirt" (c.1250), and "triangular piece of cloth" (c.1325).

Brian Defferding
02-22-2006, 02:12 PM
Brian = Celtic for "Strong" :Powerman:

Defferding = "Differdange" which is a city in the country of Luxembourg. No idea if the name has any meaning behind it.

Caley Tibbittz
02-22-2006, 02:15 PM
I changed my last name to Tibbittz a few years back. It's a variation of Tibbetts, which is based on Theobald:

English and German: from a Germanic personal name composed of the unattested element þeudo- ‘people’, ‘race’ + bald ‘bold’, ‘brave’. The English surname represents a learned form, re-created from French Théobald; the common medieval form of the name was Tebald, Tibalt (Old French Teobaud, Tibaut).

But my original name was Collopy, which means:

Irish (Limerick): Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Colpa, ‘son of Colpa’, which is possibly a byname based on colpa ‘collop’. A collop originally denoted a fully grown horse or cow, and from there came to denote an area of grazing land sufficient to support such an animal.

Randomus
02-22-2006, 02:18 PM
Matthew means "Gift of Yahweh" or something like that.

Metford means something like "middle of the bridge". Apparently it was a surname given to my family after some distant ancestor back in jolly ole' England singlehandedly held a bridge against an invading force. I only wish I was that much of a badass.

Yannick
02-22-2006, 02:22 PM
My real surname (which I'm not giving) means only one thing : "from a specific river".
My ancestors were the sole bakers / owners of windmills on a local river in my hometown and when the king decided to register names, they named them "the windmill operators of the XXX river", shortened later to "d'XXX", then losing the (non noble) particle last century.

Research has shown that there were only 8 people across the globe with my name over the last century : I've known them all and there are only 3 left now... The pressure for reproduction is higher than ever...

And my first name, Yannick, is from french britanny and means 'Little John' (both masculine and feminine)

stevapalooza
02-22-2006, 02:25 PM
My surname is Bialik and it's means "light haired man" in Polish. It's a pretty common name in Slavic countries. Some famous Bialiks include a Russian poet and a perky sitcom actress.

The Zevad
02-22-2006, 02:40 PM
My full name means Beloved(first) Grain (is the only meaning I could find for my last name)

mike black
02-22-2006, 02:52 PM
Michael : From the Hebrew name Miyka'el which meant "who is like God?". This is the name of one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies, and thus is considered the patron saint of soldiers. This was also the name of nine Byzantine emperors and a czar of Russia. Other more modern bearers of this name include the 19th-century chemist/physicist Michael Faraday and basketball player Michael Jordan.

Black : O.E. blæc "black," from P.Gmc. *blak- (cf. O.N. blakkr "dark," Du. blaken "to burn"), from PIE *bhleg- "burn, gleam" (cf. Gk. phlegein "to burn, scorch," L. flagrare "to blaze, glow, burn"). Same root produced O.E. blac "white, bright" (see bleach), the common notion being "lack of hue." The main O.E. word for "black" was sweart. "In ME. it is often doubtful whether blac, blak, blake, means 'black, dark,' or 'pale, colourless, wan, livid.' " Adjective used of dark-skinned people in O.E. The noun in this sense is first attested 1625 (blackamoor is from 1547; see moor). Of coffee, first attested 1796. Sense of "dark purposes, malignant" emerged 1583 (e.g. black art, 1590). Black list "list of persons who have incurred suspicion" is from 1692. Black market first attested 1931. Black eye in figurative sense of "bad reputation" is from 1880s. Blackberry was in O.E.; blackbird is from 1486. Black friar "Dominican" is first recorded 1500, so called from the color of their dress. black widow spider (1915) so called from the female's supposed habit of eating the male after mating (they are cannibalistic, but this particular behavior is rare in the wild). Black panther is from 1965, the movement an outgrowth of Student Nonviolent Co-ordinating Committee. Black comedy first recorded 1963 (cf. Fr. pièce noire). To be in the black (1928) is from the accounting practice of recording credits and balances in black ink.

The Girl
02-22-2006, 03:18 PM
If anyone can tell me what "Longval" means... I dunno. I do know it's French. *thumbs up*

TonyFleecs
02-22-2006, 03:31 PM
Fleecs we're not 100% sure about.

It's either from Polish Fleecski (Flee-Ski)the "ki" got chopped somewhere along the way or it's Greman Fliss (Fliss)... there's some controversy over wich is correct.

I'm pulling for Fleecski.

Thomas Mauer
02-22-2006, 03:37 PM
Thomas - Greek version of the Aramaic Te'oma = "twin"

Mauer - German for wall.

Angel of Distraction
02-22-2006, 03:41 PM
I don't know, but Ryan=Kingly and Matthews=gift of Jehovah.

Even though this is only an etymological fact and I didn't say I thought it was accurate, I fully expect to receive shit about it.

Edit: and at least one person calling me a martyr or drama queen for that last one-liner. I'm a fortune teller! :D

Thomas Mauer
02-22-2006, 03:54 PM
Fleecs we're not 100% sure about.

It's either from Polish Fleecski (Flee-Ski)the "ki" got chopped somewhere along the way or it's Greman Fliss (Fliss)... there's some controversy over wich is correct.

I'm pulling for Fleecski.
What's Fliss supposed to mean? :-?

james michael
02-22-2006, 03:59 PM
long...

it means long, i guess...
it suits me :heybaby:

eroz
02-22-2006, 04:03 PM
Robert = "Bright Fame"
Sánchez = "Son of Holy Man"