PDA

View Full Version : Is there a dentist in the house?



Forrest
06-11-2011, 09:42 AM
You know when gum disease is the most fun? When you're laidoff, broke, going through bankruptcy and without dental insurance.

Anyone know how much dentures cost? :danceyar:

stevapalooza
06-11-2011, 09:51 AM
Have you tried applying for Medicaid? You don't have to be totally destitute to qualify. Lots of working people on Medicaid.

BriRedfern
06-11-2011, 10:12 AM
Gum disease?

They say that is an indicator for heart disease, but I have my own theories about the correlation and whether there is causality there or not.

Forrest
06-11-2011, 10:40 AM
Have you tried applying for Medicaid? You don't have to be totally destitute to qualify. Lots of working people on Medicaid.

I didn't think Medicaid covered dental but it makes sense. Dental problems aside, I have very good health. So, this whole being uninsured while I'm unemployed thing didn't concern me until over the course of the past week my gums have been killing me and bleeding a bit when brushing. I can't have my teeth falling out when I'm in job interviews. It's already ludicrously brutal out there already being an "overqualified" member of the "long term unemployed." I have a bachelors degree (3.7 GPA) and I spent almost three years in college working as a bank teller. Two weeks ago, I had three job interviews, two for teller positions at banks and one at a record store. Didn't get any of them. In my last job, I was designing a medical device that used pumps and infrared optics to pump blood from an ICU patient and analysis his/her blood glucose levels. Now, I'm apparently unfit to sell Kayne's latest CD or process Jack-in-Box's daily deposit. If I'm missing teeth on top of it, I might as well just give up now. /rant

Yeah, I'll look into Medicaid if this gets tricky. I can probably afford a brief evaluation visit at a local dentist but for any real work, until I get a job/insurance again, something like Medicaid might be the only thing standing between me and getting dentures in my early 30s.

BriRedfern
06-11-2011, 10:53 AM
I didn't think Medicaid covered dental but it makes sense. Dental problems aside, I have very good health. So, this whole being uninsured while I'm unemployed thing didn't concern me until over the course of the past week my gums have been killing me and bleeding a bit when brushing. I can't have my teeth falling out when I'm in job interviews. It's already ludicrously brutal out there already being an "overqualified" member of the "long term unemployed." I have a bachelors degree (3.7 GPA) and I spent almost three years in college working as a bank teller. Two weeks ago, I had three job interviews, two for teller positions at banks and one at a record store. Didn't get any of them. In my last job, I was designing a medical device that used pumps and infrared optics to pump blood from an ICU patient and analysis his/her blood glucose levels. Now, I'm apparently unfit to sell Kayne's latest CD or process Jack-in-Box's daily deposit. If I'm missing teeth on top of it, I might as well just give up now. /rant

Yeah, I'll look into Medicaid if this gets tricky. I can probably afford a brief evaluation visit at a local dentist but for any real work, until I get a job/insurance again, something like Medicaid might be the only thing standing between me and getting dentures in my early 30s.

It is a pretty big leap from some bleeding gums to dentures. Did you go to the dentist regularly when you were insured? When was the last time you saw a dentist?

Phantom Eagle
06-11-2011, 11:03 AM
My wife works for a dentist.

One thing I can tell you is that right now they need patients badly, as people generally hate going to the dentist, and in a down economy, it's something many people simply cannot afford.

You may be able to find a dentist that is very willing to accept a payment plan, and work with you to set up a treatment schedule that is conducive to your budget.

If you automatically assume that they have all the power, then you're negotiating from a weaker position. See if you can work something out with them. They need clients. Some dentist's offices have so few patients right now that they are forced to close down an extra day each week, consolidating all of their appointments into fewer days.

Get as many free consultations from as many different dentists as you can, and keep looking until you find someone who isn't telling you that you need all new teeth, and that you need to pay in advance.

Cheers.

BriRedfern
06-11-2011, 11:11 AM
My wife works for a dentist.

One thing I can tell you is that right now they need patients badly, as people generally hate going to the dentist, and in a down economy, it's something many people simply cannot afford.

You may be able to find a dentist that is very willing to accept a payment plan, and work with you to set up a treatment schedule that is conducive to your budget.

If you automatically assume that they have all the power, then you're negotiating from a weaker position. See if you can work something out with them. They need clients. Some dentist's offices have so few patients right now that they are forced to close down an extra day each week, consolidating all of their appointments into fewer days.

Get as many free consultations from as many different dentists as you can, and keep looking until you find someone who isn't telling you that you need all new teeth, and that you need to pay in advance.

Cheers.

I have heard this from other people as well. If you find a small individual practice, you can often times haggle a bit for dental work. You should be able to get a check up at the very least.

Phantom Eagle
06-11-2011, 11:26 AM
You may also find out that you just need a good deep cleaning, and that it's not full-blown gum disease. One hygiene appointment may be able to get you through the summer.

Jason California
06-11-2011, 11:31 AM
It would have been more fun if you were going through a divorce now on top of all that.

Phantom Eagle
06-11-2011, 11:34 AM
It would have been more fun if you were going through a divorce now on top of all that.

I hope you knocked wood three times after you typed that.

Jason California
06-11-2011, 11:38 AM
I hope you knocked wood three times after you typed that.


My divorce was finalized in January.

Phantom Eagle
06-11-2011, 11:42 AM
My divorce was finalized in January.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZZfJIC_ACl4

Jason California
06-11-2011, 11:46 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZZfJIC_ACl4


It is OK. The relationship was over well before that.

Phantom Eagle
06-11-2011, 11:56 AM
It is OK. The relationship was over well before that.

Kids?

Jason California
06-11-2011, 12:05 PM
nope.

Phantom Eagle
06-11-2011, 12:14 PM
nope.

Makes things a little less complicated. I'm happy that you're happy (that is, if you're happy; otherwise I'm sad that you're sad). Were you referring to you own situation when you said unemployed, bankrupt and divorced?

Jason California
06-11-2011, 12:19 PM
Makes things a little less complicated. I'm happy that you're happy (that is, if you're happy; otherwise I'm sad that you're sad). Were you referring to you own situation when you said unemployed, bankrupt and divorced?


nope.

Kirblar
06-11-2011, 12:39 PM
Where are you living Forrest?

Forrest
06-11-2011, 01:52 PM
Thanks for the advice, Phantom Eagle! Years ago, I had bad experiences with some dentist offices in San Diego when I chipped a couple teeth. Every place I went to made me fill out a credit application for a dental plan credit line/card. When I got turned down because I have bad credit, I was basically told "goodbye. Come back when you've got money." Meanwhile, I've got an exposed nerve on a chipped tooth and it hurts all the time. Great. :P

Now though, I'm living in a much different part of the country and as you pointed out, the economy really sucks. Also, I'd never heard of dentists doing free consultations. I thought every time I see a dentist, I have to pay no matter what.


Where are you living Forrest?

Small town Idaho. We actually have a free clinic here. They are pretty limited in resources though. I know because I volunteered there last fall. They can't do things like regular cleanings or anything fancy and expensive like crowns. (Lots of patients got told that about the best we could do for them was extractions.) Still, it's a good resource and I'll give them a call next week.


It is a pretty big leap from some bleeding gums to dentures. Did you go to the dentist regularly when you were insured? When was the last time you saw a dentist?

Yeah, I'm paranoid and have a way of stressing myself out these days. My grandpa had dentures and I know that my mom's dental problems have been pretty extensive. So, I'm letting the genetics factor freak me out. Admittedly, it's been about two years since I saw a dentist, due to a number of reasons. So, I have been slacking, even though I brush and mouthwash religiously with the occasional flossing. :D

Kirblar
06-11-2011, 01:58 PM
Small town Idaho.
Are you stuck there? Rural America is not really where you want to be in today's economy.

I suspect you might be getting turned down because you're overqualified and they have a lot of options available to them, and don't want to risk giving the job to someone who'll leave within 6 months to a year for a "real" job.

Phantom Eagle
06-11-2011, 02:20 PM
Are you stuck there? Rural America is not really where you want to be in today's economy.

I suspect you might be getting turned down because you're overqualified and they have a lot of options available to them, and don't want to risk giving the job to someone who'll leave within 6 months to a year for a "real" job.

Or be way smarter than they are and basically be running the place in no time at all. Or maybe even show the boss how stupid they are and steal their job.

Phantom Eagle
06-11-2011, 02:33 PM
Thanks for the advice, Phantom Eagle! Years ago, I had bad experiences with some dentist offices in San Diego when I chipped a couple teeth. Every place I went to made me fill out a credit application for a dental plan credit line/card. When I got turned down because I have bad credit, I was basically told "goodbye. Come back when you've got money." Meanwhile, I've got an exposed nerve on a chipped tooth and it hurts all the time. Great. :P

Now though, I'm living in a much different part of the country and as you pointed out, the economy really sucks. Also, I'd never heard of dentists doing free consultations. I thought every time I see a dentist, I have to pay no matter what.



Small town Idaho. We actually have a free clinic here. They are pretty limited in resources though. I know because I volunteered there last fall. They can't do things like regular cleanings or anything fancy and expensive like crowns. (Lots of patients got told that about the best we could do for them was extractions.) Still, it's a good resource and I'll give them a call next week.



Yeah, I'm paranoid and have a way of stressing myself out these days. My grandpa had dentures and I know that my mom's dental problems have been pretty extensive. So, I'm letting the genetics factor freak me out. Admittedly, it's been about two years since I saw a dentist, due to a number of reasons. So, I have been slacking, even though I brush and mouthwash religiously with the occasional flossing. :D

Flossing is your best friend. It'll hurt less, the more you do it. Be gentle, and try to do it two or three times a day. Sometimes mouthwash can actually kill the beneficial stuff that lives in your mouth. I've heard that it's better just to rinse your mouth out with water, brush your tongue, and floss religiously. You may also be able to look on the web and see what kind of foods aid gum rebuilding, and what things to avoid if you're having troubles.

Also, if you schedule a hygiene appointment (a cleaning), you usually get a free consultation included in the price of the cleaning, because they want to get you to come back again, for real dental work. Try to get as much free advice as you can (admittedly hard when someone has their fist shoved into your face). Ask the hygienist a lot of questions, it'll be cheaper than the doctor's time, and usually they are really knowledgeable.

Also, find out how much free or cheap stuff they will give you to get you to come back. Sometimes you can get a screaming deal on an electric toothbrush. The new ones rotate, instead of the old fake-brushing motion, and the shape of the head makes it real easy to clean under the gum line. Replace that old-fashioned manual brush every six months, and try to find a bristle style and firmness that doesn't bother your gums so much.

Try avoiding sugar, really hot or cold drinks, processed foods and try eating as much whole food as possible. Good luck. Cheers.

Andreas
06-11-2011, 03:02 PM
I second an electric toothbrush. In addition to flossing also use dental brush sticks (http://www.dentocare.co.uk/Products/Interdental-Sticks/Dent-O-Care-Brush-Sticks). Cleaning interdental spaces from plaque is one effect, plus the massage effect makes the gums stronger so the bleeding stops after one or two weeks.

Forrest
06-11-2011, 03:21 PM
Are you stuck there? Rural America is not really where you want to be in today's economy.

I suspect you might be getting turned down because you're overqualified and they have a lot of options available to them, and don't want to risk giving the job to someone who'll leave within 6 months to a year for a "real" job.

I'm applying nationwide right now. And yeah, I've heard the usual HR reasons why I'm "overqualified," I just think they're stupid reasons. I've been applying for everything I can find in my field but it's been insane out there. So, if an HR person at the local bank thinks that I could find a better job in six months, that person has a lot more faith in my resume and this economy than I do. ...I don't want to bitch too much about being unemployed because I could do that all day and I've got complaining about my gums to be doing. :)


Flossing is your best friend. It'll hurt less, the more you do it. Be gentle, and try to do it two or three times a day. Sometimes mouthwash can actually kill the beneficial stuff that lives in your mouth. I've heard that it's better just to rinse your mouth out with water, brush your tongue, and floss religiously. You may also be able to look on the web and see what kind of foods aid gum rebuilding, and what things to avoid if you're having troubles.

Also, if you schedule a hygiene appointment (a cleaning), you usually get a free consultation included in the price of the cleaning, because they want to get you to come back again, for real dental work. Try to get as much free advice as you can (admittedly hard when someone has their fist shoved into your face). Ask the hygienist a lot of questions, it'll be cheaper than the doctor's time, and usually they are really knowledgeable.

Also, find out how much free or cheap stuff they will give you to get you to come back. Sometimes you can get a screaming deal on an electric toothbrush. The new ones rotate, instead of the old fake-brushing motion, and the shape of the head makes it real easy to clean under the gum line. Replace that old-fashioned manual brush every six months, and try to find a bristle style and firmness that doesn't bother your gums so much.

Try avoiding sugar, really hot or cold drinks, processed foods and try eating as much whole food as possible. Good luck. Cheers.

Thanks for the tips. I hadn't even thought about foods I'm eating but I have had two recent diet changes that I should reconsider: cooking with and eating jalapenos almost every day (just got on a jalapeno kick to substitute my usual addiction to hot sauce) and drinking a decent bit of coffee (usually stick to tea but I've been on a coffee kick).

I'll keep an eye out for electric toothbrushes. I bought a Colgate one at the supermarket last year for about $20 but stopped using it the electric aspect of it soon after I bought it just because it didn't feel right or like it was doing anything. (Yeah, I know, sound, objective logic.) I switched back to manual brushes but looking at the electric again, maybe I just don't know how to brush with an electric toothbrush or that supermarket electric toothbrush sucks.

Kirblar
06-11-2011, 04:41 PM
I'm applying nationwide right now. And yeah, I've heard the usual HR reasons why I'm "overqualified," I just think they're stupid reasons. I've been applying for everything I can find in my field but it's been insane out there. So, if an HR person at the local bank thinks that I could find a better job in six months, that person has a lot more faith in my resume and this economy than I do. ...I don't want to bitch too much about being unemployed because I could do that all day and I've got complaining about my gums to be doing.
The problem for you is that the positions are going to have an insane amount of applicants, and there's likely someone competent enough who will look like they're going to stick around a while, unfortunately.

Udiguhgudibuh
06-12-2011, 12:22 PM
:blah: As others on this thread have commented, (1) dental problems are connected to much bigger medical problems (e.g., heart disease). Searching PeoplesPharmacy.com is always a good start.

(2) Today's rotten economy makes this "a buyer's market." Professionals in every area are desperate for work. Are you familiar with "Groupon"? It's a "group-coupon" concept perfect for hard times + Internet.

Get on the Groupon computer list and you'll get regular lists of half-price professional services from optometrists, dentists (tooth whitening, and everything else), picture framers, restaurants-- everything. Limited number of time-sensitive offers-- with several months to collect on your Groupon.

(3) Yes, brush and floss after every teenie snack. A water pic may be the only help for rear molars that have lost fillings and splintered enamel shards.

Bill!
06-12-2011, 12:25 PM
Are you stuck there? Rural America is not really where you want to be in today's economy.



That really depends. North Dakota and Alaska have proven nearly immune to the recession.

Udiguhgudibuh
06-12-2011, 12:27 PM
It is OK. The relationship was over well before that.

:thumb: Congratulations on your successful divorce-- the best way to lose at least 100+ pounds that were only dragging you down.

Kirblar
06-12-2011, 12:30 PM
That really depends. North Dakota and Alaska have proven nearly immune to the recession.
http://www.taxfoundation.org/research/show/22685.html

This is why. (And why Sarah Palin is a hypocritical (insert nasty name of your choice here.))

Bill!
06-12-2011, 12:32 PM
http://www.taxfoundation.org/research/show/22685.html

This is why. (And why Sarah Palin is a hypocritical (insert nasty name of your choice here.))

Well, to be fair to ND, the oil boom is really holding things together, and a lot of the federal money the state receives is disaster relief and re-construction.

Plus, the housing market in ND never really did what it did in other places, along with lending. Foreclosures, bad debt, lost jobs, they just aren't really that present in ND like elsewhere.

Kirblar
06-12-2011, 12:34 PM
Well, to be fair to ND, the oil boom is really holding things together, and a lot of the federal money the state receives is disaster relief and re-construction.
I just looked at Minnesota - no wonder libertarianism plays so well there- they get almost no federal spending. :lol:

Girlfriend In A Coma
06-12-2011, 01:01 PM
Just another treatment suggestion- There is a peroxide mouthwash called Peroxyl that Colgate makes. While I had braces my gums would be cut and irritated and I found that this helped a lot. You can just use straight hydrogen peroxide but this doesn't leave such a gross aftertaste. Combined with brushing and flossing/gum massage this may help a bit.

Forrest
06-12-2011, 03:53 PM
Just another treatment suggestion- There is a peroxide mouthwash called Peroxyl that Colgate makes. While I had braces my gums would be cut and irritated and I found that this helped a lot. You can just use straight hydrogen peroxide but this doesn't leave such a gross aftertaste. Combined with brushing and flossing/gum massage this may help a bit.

Hey, I'll keep an eye out for that. I've never tried a peroxide mouthwash before and never would have guessed it could help with irritated gums.

tooms
06-12-2011, 06:19 PM
You know when gum disease is the most fun? When you're laidoff, broke, going through bankruptcy and without dental insurance.

Anyone know how much dentures cost? :danceyar:

Remember that anything I say is not diagnosis and is merely advice meant to guide you to proper health and treatment.

As a former dentist, I can tell you that gum diseases can turn into nasty situations, going from local to systemic problems. But there are different kinds of gum disease. If it's a simple gingivitis you can control it with better hygiene (just don't overfloss. It can cut your gum and provide access to your circulatory system to bacteria from your mouth and they can install in some places they are not supposed to be, like your heart). If it's a little more serious, curettage and scaling.

But they can progress to periodontitis, depending on the situation, and that's complicated.

People don't associate it, but stress is a cause for gum disease. There are specific ones that are caused by stress (that's not your case, I believe. Those are very extreme cases called ANUG and those are associated with a very infectious bacteria), because of its effects on the immune system.

Good flossing and brushing helps fighting gum disease. I know that's a cliche, but it's the truth. Also if you can find mouthwash containing chlorhexidine, that would be good (just don't use more than once a day, it can irritate the tissues of the mouth).

Because if you already have developed some serious condition, maybe the free clinic in your region can swab the area and analyse it to find out what specific bacteria are the cause of the disease and attack them with specific antibiotics.

I know that you have said that you have cases in your family of gum disease progressing to the point of needing dentures. But unless you don't floss or even brush at least once a day (flossing, not brushing that has to be done at least three times a day) it will take some time before you need dentures.

Hope I could help.

AndreGDMD
06-12-2011, 06:25 PM
Hi, I am a periodontist, which is a specialist in dentistry that deals specifically with gum disease.

Remember that anything I say is not diagnosis and is merely advice meant to guide you to proper health and treatment.

Many dental offices will offer free exams and do offer some discounts or payment plans.

That said, I would not say that this is a buyers market. The reason that dentistry is so expensive is how expensive the education is. I took me $500K in student loans and 11 years of college to do what I do. I need to make $250 an hour to not have the doors locked and go bankrupt. Also, I am nice but not a charity. After that much work and sacrifice I want to make something, just like anyone else would. I would rather not work thado it for a pittance
Gum disease has been shown to have a link with many other inflammatory diseases. It will likely not cause a heart attack, but no one can say that it doesn't contribute.

You may not need to have dentures. The degree of bone loss around the roots of the teeth would have to be severe for you to loose any tooth, let alone all of them. If you are young it is less likely that you need to lose all your teeth. There are genetic dispositions to losing teeth, but it doesn't condem you to that fate. Hopefully you can get a deep cleaning. After that proper care at home with brushing and flossing should keep it in check. If you are genetically susceptible you would need a cleaning every three months. Everyone should have a cleaning every three months, but more so if you are at risk. It takes three months for the bacteria to build up to a level that is pathologic and dangerous to the teeth.

Private practices are more interested in helping people that the corporate chains. The dentist at the chains have quotas that they need to meet or else be fired. At private practice the doctors are more likely to be doing the right thing, especially if it his or her name on the sign.

BriRedfern
06-12-2011, 06:44 PM
Gum disease has been shown to have a link with many other inflammatory diseases. It will likely not cause a heart attack, but no one can say that it doesn't contribute.


Many people can, and do, say that it does not contribute. The fact of the matter is that many of the people that do not care for their dental hygiene neglect other areas of their health as well. While a correlation has been shown between gum and heart disease, a causal relationship has not been proven to my knowledge. I am not an expert in the field, but the causal relationship between these two things seems spurious to me at best.

AndreGDMD
06-13-2011, 03:17 AM
As an expert in the field, the connection is stronger than just "if he doesn't take good care of his mouth, he also doesn't take good care of his body"

There is an inflammatory response to the bacteria of periodontal disease that elevates certain cytokines in the blood system that can adversely effect other organs and conditions

BriRedfern
06-13-2011, 04:21 AM
I can not find any articles that have established a concrete causal reltaionship between the two, and most of aricles claiming the such a relationship are issued through periadontal associates.

I would totally be interested in seeing when the causal link was established. I know there is a lot of talk about the issue, but certainly many people think there are important socio-economic issues at play in the correlations shown through clinical studies.

Udiguhgudibuh
06-13-2011, 08:15 AM
I can not find any articles that have established a concrete causal reltaionship between the two, and most of aricles claiming the such a relationship are issued through periadontal associates.

I would totally be interested in seeing when the causal link was established. I know there is a lot of talk about the issue, but certainly many people think there are important socio-economic issues at play in the correlations shown through clinical studies.

:clock: The problem with finding definitive proof is that science is soooo slow-- and frequently reversed or revised. Remember that it took decades for cigarettes to go from (1) possibly dangerous, to (2) can definitely kill you. (FYI, for every smoker who dies of lung cancer, tobacco causes two more deaths from heart disease.)

The evidence for a link between dental and systemic health has been around for a long time; I'm sure you can find studies on both sides of the issue. My "belief," however, is that a strong link will ultimately be proven.

:?: What to do? I buy a dozen rolls of dental floss (when it's on sale) and keep one at every chair where I work or watch TV. I own half a dozen tooth brushes (also bought on sale) and choose the next one by simply feeling for "the dry one."
...............................................

*Whether it's running shoes or tooth brushes, cycling multiple pairs lasts much longer than using one at a time.

AndreGDMD
06-13-2011, 02:55 PM
If you are interested in proper articles about the link, look up the articles in The Journal of Periodontolgy, the New England Journal of Medicine, and any of the reputable cardiology journals. articles like News Week or the such don't count. I am talking about proper medical peer reviewed journals, not crap articles than anyone on a soap box can write. There need to be actual medical research and studies to prove a point.

And like I said, the inflammation in your gums will not single handedly cause a heart attack, but it does contribute to the overall condition of excessive systemic inflammation which causes a degradation in health. Anyone who can not acknowledge this is just unaware or uninformed about how systemic inflammation works.

BriRedfern
06-13-2011, 03:33 PM
:clock: The problem with finding definitive proof is that science is soooo slow-- and frequently reversed or revised. Remember that it took decades for cigarettes to go from (1) possibly dangerous, to (2) can definitely kill you. (FYI, for every smoker who dies of lung cancer, tobacco causes two more deaths from heart disease.)

The evidence for a link between dental and systemic health has been around for a long time; I'm sure you can find studies on both sides of the issue. My "belief," however, is that a strong link will ultimately be proven.

:?: What to do? I buy a dozen rolls of dental floss (when it's on sale) and keep one at every chair where I work or watch TV. I own half a dozen tooth brushes (also bought on sale) and choose the next one by simply feeling for "the dry one."
...............................................

*Whether it's running shoes or tooth brushes, cycling multiple pairs lasts much longer than using one at a time.

The idea of you flossing on your couch is unapealling to me.

Udiguhgudibuh
06-13-2011, 06:58 PM
The idea of you flossing on your couch is unapealling to me.

:D The key to successful flossing in any environment without endangering children, pets, or sensitive females is (1) technique, (2) practice, and (3) having very supple lips & cheeks. Catapulting food particles about the room is easily avoided.

For an initial three-week training period, you may wish to wear a pillowcase over your head. (Following the procedure, invert the pillow case to monitor your technique.)

My favorite flossing story is from an Internet friend who finally impressed her husband with the importance of flossing. Returning from the bathroom with a two-inch length of floss, he asked, "Now what do I do with it?"

Forrest
06-14-2011, 08:42 AM
AndreGDMD and tooms, thanks for the advice! I appreciate it.


The reason that dentistry is so expensive is how expensive the education is. I took me $500K in student loans and 11 years of college to do what I do. I need to make $250 an hour to not have the doors locked and go bankrupt.

Oh yeah, as someone with student loans myself, I understand this.

Last year, when I moved to this area, I got a $125 gift card from one of the local dentist's offices and I set it aside and forgot about it. Yesterday, I remembered that I had the card, called the dentist and sure enough it's still valid and they're going to give me a exam, bite wing x-rays and $125 credit towards whatever work I might need done. The receptionist said that with today's appointment, if they determine I have some kind of gum problem that requires an antibiotic or antiviral mouthwash, they should be able to get me that diagnosis and medicine today. This makes me happy because I have the first big camping trip of the year coming up this weekend.

Regardless, I think I learned a lesson that I need to start flossing more. I rarely do. (I'm sure dentist and hygienists hear this all the time but the reason I don't floss often is that near the tops of my teeth, they can be tightly pressed together, so it's hard to get the floss between my teeth. Then, when it does get between them, I usually have too much force pushing down and I hit the bottom of my gums hard and that hurts. I'd heard that continuing to floss will open up the gaps between teeth a little better so I'm not attacking my gums whenever I floss but I just haven't been diligent enough in the past to get there.) My new goal is to floss every day, now that I've seen how much it can suck when my mouth isn't happy.

Udiguhgudibuh
06-14-2011, 12:22 PM
:D Congratulations on boldly exploring new worlds of flossing and brushing!

Yes, if your gums bleed or hurt when flossing, your dental technician immediately knows that you haven't been flossing regularly. If your tongue tells you your teeth feel slightly "furry" instead of smooth, it means you haven't been brushing every corner long enough, and often enough. (The "furry" stuff is dental plaque-- precursor of decay.)

Tips? Use toothpaste in very modest amounts-- half the size of a pea. Using more makes your mouth foam like a rapid dog, and you'll quit before you should. (Two minutes per brushing is the recommended time, and too much peppermint drool makes you quit early.)

Brush and floss in whatever room you choose, preferably in front of some entertainment device-- such as a tee-vee screen.

:blah: Be brave! Don't let past habits or social convention stop you from your new dental adventures. (It's also the cheapest thing you can do for something you use every day-- your mouth.)

tooms
06-14-2011, 06:55 PM
:D Congratulations on boldly exploring new worlds of flossing and brushing!

Yes, if your gums bleed or hurt when flossing, your dental technician immediately knows that you haven't been flossing regularly. If your tongue tells you your teeth feel slightly "furry" instead of smooth, it means you haven't been brushing every corner long enough, and often enough. (The "furry" stuff is dental plaque-- precursor of decay.)

Tips? Use toothpaste in very modest amounts-- half the size of a pea. Using more makes your mouth foam like a rapid dog, and you'll quit before you should. (Two minutes per brushing is the recommended time, and too much peppermint drool makes you quit early.)

Brush and floss in whatever room you choose, preferably in front of some entertainment device-- such as a tee-vee screen.

:blah: Be brave! Don't let past habits or social convention stop you from your new dental adventures. (It's also the cheapest thing you can do for something you use every day-- your mouth.)

Actually, you should floss in front of a mirror, so you can see if you're doing it right (also to avoid using more force than necessary and hurting your gums).

Forrest
06-15-2011, 09:34 AM
Try to get as much free advice as you can (admittedly hard when someone has their fist shoved into your face). Ask the hygienist a lot of questions, it'll be cheaper than the doctor's time, and usually they are really knowledgeable.

Also, find out how much free or cheap stuff they will give you to get you to come back. Sometimes you can get a screaming deal on an electric toothbrush. The new ones rotate, instead of the old fake-brushing motion, and the shape of the head makes it real easy to clean under the gum line. Replace that old-fashioned manual brush every six months, and try to find a bristle style and firmness that doesn't bother your gums so much.

I had an appointment with a dentist yesterday and took your advice to heart. I picked the brain of the dentist and two hygienists on all my concerns and questions, including the endless debate about mouthwash.

I was able to get in almost three hours at the dentist for $160 + my gift card for free exam and x-rays. My diagnosis was pretty routine and the only treatment they said I need is regular cleanings at the dentist office, chlorohexidine mouthwash and getting better about flossing. The hygienist I saw was someone who was filling in for one of the office's regular hygienists who was away. This substitute hygienist is actually an instructor at the dental hygine school at the local university and she did an amazing job. My mouth started to feel better almost immediately and today soooo much better.

With all the pain and discomfort I was feeling, I never would have guessed that simple cleanings was all I needed. That all too prominent paranoid part of me assumed the worst, that I'd need thousands of dollars in work done, like tons of root canals or something. I'm very happy to get away with a $160 appointment + $17 for Rx mouthwash. Have a follow-up in two weeks that will be $60. I can deal with this financially and that makes me happy.

Thanks again for all the tips everyone.

P.S. Udiguhgudibuh, I love to cover my brush in toothpaste. Can't do the pea size thing.

Phantom Eagle
06-15-2011, 09:42 PM
I had an appointment with a dentist yesterday and took your advice to heart. I picked the brain of the dentist and two hygienists on all my concerns and questions, including the endless debate about mouthwash.

I was able to get in almost three hours at the dentist for $160 + my gift card for free exam and x-rays. My diagnosis was pretty routine and the only treatment they said I need is regular cleanings at the dentist office, chlorohexidine mouthwash and getting better about flossing. The hygienist I saw was someone who was filling in for one of the office's regular hygienists who was away. This substitute hygienist is actually an instructor at the dental hygine school at the local university and she did an amazing job. My mouth started to feel better almost immediately and today soooo much better.

With all the pain and discomfort I was feeling, I never would have guessed that simple cleanings was all I needed. That all too prominent paranoid part of me assumed the worst, that I'd need thousands of dollars in work done, like tons of root canals or something. I'm very happy to get away with a $160 appointment + $17 for Rx mouthwash. Have a follow-up in two weeks that will be $60. I can deal with this financially and that makes me happy.

Thanks again for all the tips everyone.

P.S. Udiguhgudibuh, I love to cover my brush in toothpaste. Can't do the pea size thing.

Right on, dude. Glad to hear things worked out for you. Cheers.