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Gordon Chumway
06-09-2011, 05:34 PM
In either of the two main universes. I would guess in the 616 that he is in his 20s so he has been Spiderman for close to a decade of his life, but he could also be pushing 30.

Ultimate Spiderman is a bit trickier, he has only had the one birthday so I would guess it has only been about ten months. However in one of the last issues he says something like "over the years that I have been spiderman." So maybe it is closer to 18 months.

Jason California
06-09-2011, 05:37 PM
616 - 8 years, 6 months, and 4 days.

Ultimate - 18 months.

Matt Jay
06-09-2011, 05:46 PM
I figured 616 has been a rolling 15 years for Spider-man and the FF. The McFarlane and Larson-drawn Peter Parker that I grew up with the in 90s always seemed older. I had him pegged at 33. That makes me feel good, because he is still older than me.

USM- no more than 2 years.

Andrew
06-09-2011, 06:00 PM
There is enough in-story evidence in Spider-Man's books to suggest that he's been at the game for about 15 years, but you'll never see Marvel admit that. The Clone Saga alone, which was 15 years ago our time and a few years ago in Marvel time (as the current books suggest), was repeatedly stated in the comics to have taken place 7 years after Gwen died, and Gwen died when Peter had already been Spider-Man for about 5 years Marvel time (i.e. he was quite a ways through college by that point).

Gordon Chumway
06-09-2011, 06:02 PM
I figured 616 has been a rolling 15 years for Spider-man and the FF. The McFarlane and Larson-drawn Peter Parker that I grew up with the in 90s always seemed older. I had him pegged at 33. That makes me feel good, because he is still older than me.

USM- no more than 2 years.

They did seem to age him quickly in the 90s. Did Larson write Spider-man after McFarlane left? McFarlane wrote the first three arcs right?

ernster
06-09-2011, 06:05 PM
in my mind, he's much older than guys like the young avengers and much younger than guys like richards, cap, stark, and banner. they were all adults when they became super heroes. guys like johnny storm and bobby drake were about his age when he became spider-man, so they are still the same age as parker. others like scott summers are a little older but not as old as the ff or the original avengers.

i figure that people's ages in the marvel universe are all relative to each other without being an exact age. parker will never be older than richards, and he won't be younger than jubliee or sam guthrie. i'd like to think of him as perpetually in his late twenties or early thirties.

and, of course, everyone is younger than wolverine.

Gordon Chumway
06-09-2011, 06:06 PM
There is enough in-story evidence in Spider-Man's books to suggest that he's been at the game for about 15 years, but you'll never see Marvel admit that. The Clone Saga alone, which was 15 years ago our time and a few years ago in Marvel time (as the current books suggest), was repeatedly stated in the comics to have taken place 7 years after Gwen died, and Gwen died when Peter had already been Spider-Man for about 5 years Marvel time.

I didn't know a lot of that. I am always kind of glad I dropped comics before the clone saga. I feel like living through that is why people hate it so much.

HeroBoy
06-09-2011, 06:20 PM
I figured 616 has been a rolling 15 years for Spider-man and the FF. The McFarlane and Larson-drawn Peter Parker that I grew up with the in 90s always seemed older. I had him pegged at 33. That makes me feel good, because he is still older than me.

USM- no more than 2 years.

If Pete's 33 and still dealing with all the shit he deals with, that doesn't make me feel good.

In Marvel actual time passing, he has to be 28-33.
In the way that Marvel writes him and wants him to be portrayed? 21-25.

The Zevad
06-09-2011, 06:35 PM
10-12 years. It will always be 10-12 years. So that put's him between 25-27. FOREVER.

MU-HU-HA-HA~!

Chacalo
06-09-2011, 10:00 PM
He'll never know the touch of a lifelong lover. So sad.

Evan the Shaggy
06-09-2011, 10:07 PM
I'd say he's about 28. Seems like he's been Spidey for around 12 years.

Ben
06-10-2011, 04:42 AM
A while.

Beyond that, don't worry about it.

Stupendous Man
06-10-2011, 04:55 AM
He has been Spider-Man for as long as the writer needs him to have been Spider-Man

The Hodag
06-10-2011, 12:24 PM
A while.

Beyond that, don't worry about it.

This.

Broadly speaking, I like the "Marvel Time" idea. It's a sliding timescale where, if memory serves, the FF's launch into space - effectively the start of the modern Marvel era - is always considered to be about seven years ago. If it was the year 2000, they made their launch in 1993. Right now in 2011, they made their launch in 2004. Thus, the major events of Marvel's history are all roughly "in the last ten years."

It's handy. You can pick it apart by noticing specific presidents in stories or references to wars or even clothing styles, but...that's just being stupid. Suspend disbelief, accept that real time doesn't occur, don't nitpick.

Phantom Eagle
06-10-2011, 12:59 PM
Since August of 1962.

No, really, for about a decade, maybe somewhat less.

Kedd
06-10-2011, 01:04 PM
I'd guess about 8 to 10 in the 616 and 1 to 2 in USM

The Dean
06-10-2011, 01:17 PM
Pete's been Spider-Man since 1962. That's 49 years.

The Zevad
06-10-2011, 01:40 PM
A while.

Beyond that, don't worry about it.


He has been Spider-Man for as long as the writer needs him to have been Spider-Man



Broadly speaking, I like the "Marvel Time" idea. It's a sliding timescale where, if memory serves, the FF's launch into space - effectively the start of the modern Marvel era - is always considered to be about seven years ago. If it was the year 2000, they made their launch in 1993. Right now in 2011, they made their launch in 2004. Thus, the major events of Marvel's history are all roughly "in the last ten years."

It's handy. You can pick it apart by noticing specific presidents in stories or references to wars or even clothing styles, but...that's just being stupid. Suspend disbelief, accept that real time doesn't occur, don't nitpick.

All of these are the correct answers. Though they've gone a little bit more and say anywhere between ten-twelve years ago. Hasn't been seven years ago since I'd say mid 1990s maybe.

Mister Mets
06-10-2011, 01:54 PM
My favorite description of time in the Marvel Universe is that it's always going to be 10-15 years since Fantastic Four #1.

The Hodag
06-10-2011, 10:13 PM
All of these are the correct answers. Though they've gone a little bit more and say anywhere between ten-twelve years ago. Hasn't been seven years ago since I'd say mid 1990s maybe.

What's the source on that? Like, is it something Quesada said or...?

Andrew
06-10-2011, 10:50 PM
What's the source on that? Like, is it something Quesada said or...?

Are you serious? It's pretty well-known by this point. If you absolutely must have a source, there was an issue of Fantastic Four a few years ago that stated their life-altering adventure into space in FF #1 happened 13 years earlier.

And yes, Quesada and others have confirmed it in various interviews over the years. I'm a little surprised any longtime comic fan would've missed it.

Challenger
06-10-2011, 10:54 PM
How long after FF did Captain America get thawed out? must say that I find the thought of him returning to the world after 9/11 to be a quite interesting one.

Andrew
06-10-2011, 11:05 PM
How long after FF did Captain America get thawed out? must say that I find the thought of him returning to the world after 9/11 to be a quite interesting one.

As of right now he would've been thawed out a bit before 9/11 but that will change in a few years.

SteveFlack
06-10-2011, 11:12 PM
Right now, Captain America missed the Cold War.

I'm glad we're getting to the point that 9/11 happened pre- heroes. It's hard to believe 9/11 could even happen in a world of Avengers and X-Men.

The Hodag
06-10-2011, 11:16 PM
And yes, Quesada and others have confirmed it in various interviews over the years. I'm a little surprised any longtime comic fan would've missed it.

Apparently enough people don't know it that every answer in this thread has been different. :lol:

In my case, though, while I'm a longtime comic reader, I've only followed Marvel and DC in an extremely casual way in the last 8 or 10 years. I keep up on the big stuff as a retailer, but as a reader I'm just a dabbler.

The Hodag
06-10-2011, 11:17 PM
I'm glad we're getting to the point that 9/11 happened pre- heroes. It's hard to believe 9/11 could even happen in a world of Avengers and X-Men.

Good point.

Andrew
06-10-2011, 11:25 PM
Right now, Captain America missed the Cold War.

I'm glad we're getting to the point that 9/11 happened pre- heroes. It's hard to believe 9/11 could even happen in a world of Avengers and X-Men.

What's harder to imagine: that 9/11 happened in a world of Avengers and X-Men, or that any superhero could possibly maintain a secret identity in a world of DNA evidence? Every time a costumed hero bleeds after being injured, or even spits, their identity would be immediately compromised if they happen to be wanted by authorities.

The Hodag
06-10-2011, 11:32 PM
What's harder to imagine: that 9/11 happened in a world of Avengers and X-Men, or that any superhero could possibly maintain a secret identity in a world of DNA evidence? Every time a costumed hero bleeds after being injured, or even spits, their identity would be immediately compromised if they happen to be wanted by authorities.

There are surely nuances to suspension of disbelief. A big event like 9/11 is impossible for anyone to ignore, and what's more, is precisely the kind of thing they usually stop. DNA evidence is a notable part of our world, but it goes on quietly, behind closed doors. It's simply easier to ignore. And superheroes also have a tradition of outwitting authorities, so the reader might unconsciously be thinking, "Spider-Man's just learned to be cautious."

One other thing: if I'm not mistaken, DNA evidence isn't some instant pathway to tracking someone down - it has to be matched. So you could get a sample of Spider-Man's DNA from some blood, say, but what good would it do you beyond maybe some mad scientist attempts to recreate his powers? You could use it to confirm he is who he says he is if he ever testified in court or if you needed to find out if blood somewhere else was his, but it's not like you run it through computer analysis and it just pings "PETER PARKER"...right?

SteveFlack
06-10-2011, 11:33 PM
What's harder to imagine: that 9/11 happened in a world of Avengers and X-Men, or that any superhero could possibly maintain a secret identity in a world of DNA evidence? Every time a costumed hero bleeds after being injured, or even spits, their identity would be immediately compromised if they happen to be wanted by authorities.

9/11. The DNA evidence is just something you can overlook, failure to figure it out undermines the authorities, not the heroes. Plus, I'm pretty sure Nick Fury knows who everyone is anyway. 9/11 undermines the heroes. Seriously, Thor, Iron Man, hell, even Justice...none of them can stop a plane from flying into a building? Especially when it's just some everyday run of the mill non-Super terrorists involved?

Andrew
06-11-2011, 12:20 AM
There are surely nuances to suspension of disbelief. A big event like 9/11 is impossible for anyone to ignore, and what's more, is precisely the kind of thing they usually stop. DNA evidence is a notable part of our world, but it goes on quietly, behind closed doors. It's simply easier to ignore. And superheroes also have a tradition of outwitting authorities, so the reader might unconsciously be thinking, "Spider-Man's just learned to be cautious."

One other thing: if I'm not mistaken, DNA evidence isn't some instant pathway to tracking someone down - it has to be matched. So you could get a sample of Spider-Man's DNA from some blood, say, but what good would it do you beyond maybe some mad scientist attempts to recreate his powers? You could use it to confirm he is who he says he is if he ever testified in court or if you needed to find out if blood somewhere else was his, but it's not like you run it through computer analysis and it just pings "PETER PARKER"...right?

Peter Parker was actually arrested for murder back in the Clone Saga because of his DNA being identical to Kaine's. So his fingerprints and DNA would be on record. Oops.


9/11. The DNA evidence is just something you can overlook, failure to figure it out undermines the authorities, not the heroes. Plus, I'm pretty sure Nick Fury knows who everyone is anyway. 9/11 undermines the heroes. Seriously, Thor, Iron Man, hell, even Justice...none of them can stop a plane from flying into a building? Especially when it's just some everyday run of the mill non-Super terrorists involved?

Well, they couldn't stop this a decade before 9/11:

http://www.spideykicksbutt.com/DeepThoughts/SpiderManand911G.jpg

And here, it was deliberate. But you could argue that 9/11, despite being done by "everyday run of the mill non-Super terrorists" took them by surprise for that very reason, just as it took us by surprise in the real world. We didn't see it coming, and neither did they.

The Hodag
06-11-2011, 12:48 AM
Peter Parker was actually arrested for murder back in the Clone Saga because of his DNA being identical to Kaine's. So his fingerprints and DNA would be on record. Oops.

That's one story of thousands, and from an era that's largely come to be shunned no less. If it ever came up again, I suspect Spidey alone could circumvent it with a little B&E and evidence tampering. If not, he's got pals in the legal system (Daredevil), pals with government clout (the Avengers) and pals with enough know-how to take on Galactus (the FF).

He could beat a DNA rap.

As for the all the other hundreds of superheroes, unless I'm mistaken they could only be identified easily if their DNA was part of the big government database. The database only stores DNA profiles under certain circumstances, like violent offenders or sex offenders. In other words, unless most heroes probably aren't in the database to get a match on.