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View Full Version : Ohio girl becomes homecoming queen & football star in 1 night



Ryudo
10-07-2010, 06:59 AM
http://rivals.yahoo.com/highschool/blog/prep_rally/post/Ohio-girl-is-homecoming-queen-and-star-kicker-on?urn=highschool-275126



Chippewa (Ohio) High School senior Jackie Kasburg had a one of a kind homecoming last Friday. Wearing her customary pink gameday cleats, she kicked three extra points during the Chipps' 55-27 loss to Rittman (Ohio) High in the first game action of her high school career. Then, to top off the night, she was named homecoming queen.

http://a323.yahoofs.com/ymg/ept_sports_prep_rally/ept_sports_prep_rally-423602254-1286410094.jpg?ymuNq4DDUQS_ZS6H

"I grew up with football, playing in the backyard with my brothers," Kasburg told the Associated Press. "I just thought (the team) isn't doing so good and I might as well try out to see if I can help.

"I had never kicked a football until three weeks ago. My dad took me out the Sunday before my first practice and had me doing stuff. I was terrible at first, but then my dad told me the steps to take. I love it now. I think the fact I've played soccer for 13 years helped me pick it up really quickly."

According to Wooster, Ohio's The Daily Record and the Associated Press, Kasburg nailed all three of her point-after touchdown attempts on Friday, which were the first she's been afforded since joining Chippewa's team. The Chipps were shut out in their previous three games. The senior earned her placekicking role by out-kicking the team's prior starter, Mike Bramley, in a practice competition, and quickly gained the support of her new coach.

"She's such a great kid, and a real positive influence on the younger kids," Chippewa coach Kevin Wolf told The Daily Record of Wooster, Ohio. "She's a winner. She does all the drills, because I can't put her out there if she can't protect herself."

The homecoming queen, who stands approximately 5-foot-6 and 140 pounds, isn't content to settle for extra points, either. Kasburg has connected on practice field goals from as far as 43 yards out, and she's made it clear she eventually wants a shot at kicking off, too.

For now, she's unable to join other special teams units because of a lack of tackling experience, but she's busy working on that with Chippewa's freshman team during part of the school's afternoon practices.

"I've been working on my tackling with the freshman team," Kasburg told The Daily Record. "If I went up against someone like [senior wide receiver-linebacker] Andrew Schickler right now, I'd get drilled."

That being said, her teammates have plenty of confidence in her commitment, and her ability to eventually add other duties to her current point-after portfolio.

"I think the team has been very receptive to having her around," Chippewa quarterback Shane Zacour told The Daily Record. "Any talent we can add is basically going to be accepted. She's came out here, worked hard and even gone through tackling drills. She keeps getting better as a kicker, too."

Her kicking may keep improving, but it will be hard for her to ever become more popular. After all, she's already been voted homecoming queen.

"It would be great to look back in 10 years and know I helped our team win and won homecoming queen the same night," Kasburg told The Daily Record's Aaron Dorksen. "Who else can say that?"

No one can say that, including Kasburg. Of course, no one else can say they hit three extra points and won homecoming queen the same night, either. That might not be quite as impressive, but it comes pretty close.

http://a323.yahoofs.com/ymg/ept_sports_prep_rally/ept_sports_prep_rally-925168828-1286410121.jpg?ymJOq4DDESrWZpG8

artimoff
10-07-2010, 07:13 AM
I remember that movie with Scott Bacula & Kathy Ireland.

The Dean
10-07-2010, 08:17 AM
Andrew Schickler now has a reputation of drilling girls who play football.

JoeE
10-07-2010, 08:18 AM
Good for her, now just stay the fuck away from Gary Barnett or Colorado.

SteveFlack
10-07-2010, 08:32 AM
I don't understand the point of the extra point. Wouldn't getting rid of it just speed up the game? Players rarely miss. I mean, it's like what if a basketball was given a free throw after every basket. The only time it really comes into effect is when team opt for the two point conversion.

Jonny Z
10-07-2010, 08:52 AM
did she go home and bang herself that night?

RickLM
10-07-2010, 08:55 AM
What a cool story.

Magnum V.I.
10-07-2010, 08:55 AM
I don't understand the point of the extra point. Wouldn't getting rid of it just speed up the game? Players rarely miss. I mean, it's like what if a basketball was given a free throw after every basket. The only time it really comes into effect is when team opt for the two point conversion.

It's not a given and teams have lost because the kicker miffed a PAT.

When a baseball player hit's a homerun, he should just go sit down instead of running the bases because we all know he scored a point anyway.

Fourthman
10-07-2010, 09:12 AM
did she go home and bang herself that night?

Self date rape is nothing to joke about.

SteveFlack
10-07-2010, 09:31 AM
It's not a given and teams have lost because the kicker miffed a PAT.

When a baseball player hit's a homerun, he should just go sit down instead of running the bases because we all know he scored a point anyway.

While I was looking for stats on what percentage of Extra Points are missed, I found this article that sums up my feelings on this.



http://www.immaculateinning.com/2008/12/useless-sports-extra-point.html

Sports historians tell us that the Point After Try (or PAT) has its roots in the precursor to American football- rugby. A "try"-- placing the ball in the end zone-- did not score any points for the team, but triggered a kicking attempt parallel to the spot in the end zone where the ball was placed. When touchdowns became more important in American football the point totals were adjusted, but the basic principle is that a TD is worth twice a FG... unless of course you make the PAT.

Up until the 1980s, the last part of the equation was not a sure thing, as the graph found here shows. However, the percentage of missed extra-points after 1984 (when defenders were banned from taking running leaps at the line of scrimmage) has never exceeded 5%; the last time it exceeded even 2% was the 1993 season. In 2008, the percentage is staggering: up to and including Thursday's Bears-Saints game, there have been 957 extra-point attempts, and only four missed attempts. The 99.6% success rate is the best in the history of football, surpassing the 99.2% rate in 2004. It's possible that we may be confusing increased ability with statistical noise, but that has not stopped other bloggers from calling for a modification of the Point After Try.

Because we at the Immaculate Inning like to champion the rare event, let us look at the four ignoble kickers who have missed this year.

Taylor Mehlhaff, New Orleans Saints When Martin Grammatica went down to injury on October 8, the Saints re-signed Mehlhaff the man Gramatica defeated in training camp. The left-footed rookie sixth-round pick out of Wisconsin played just three weeks for the Saints, making two out of three field goal attempts, and missing the first extra point of the 2008 season. The failure made Mehlhaff famous on two continents, as the miss came in an October 27 game against the Chargers played in London. As you can (kind of) see in this video, Drew Brees had just completed a 12 yard TD pass when Mehlhaff lined up for the point-after, and you can hear in the video the result- clank! Even the American-football naive fans at Wembley had mind enough to boo his performance. So, too, did the Saints, who cut Mehlhaff two days later.

It was suggested in the ESPN-comments of that article that the Saints had no confidence in Mehlhaff to begin with, and would "frequently" go for it on fourth down. The Saints did go for it twice on fourth down at Wembley, from the 1 yard line (not suspicious) and another time on 4th and 2 on the Chargers' 14 (quite suspicious). The previous week, the Saints were held to only 7 points and Mehlhaff did not attempt an field goal; they went for it on a 4th-and-one from the Carolina 37, which is no-man's land for FGs for anyone. The fourth-quarter failed conversion on a 4th and 2 from the Carolina 3 yard also makes sense as the Saints were down by twenty points at the time. In his first game against the Raiders, Mehlhaff missed his first attempt (31 yards), made his second (44 yards), and the Saints never went for it on fourth down. As always, don't trust ESPN commenters, but it may be that the extra point did spell doom for Mehlhaff; making PATs is important for a Saints team that leads the NFL in touchdowns scored.

Jason Hanson, Detroit Lions By far the most experienced kicker of the four, Hanson has 16 years kicking in the NFL, and has made 98.5% of his extra points. This season, he was unlucky November 2 in Chicago, under some pretty terrible conditions. The muddy field was causing players to slip around all day, and the Lions struck for the first time in the second quarter on a Kevin Smith 1 yard TD run. Hanson slipped and fell in the mud during his PAT attempt, rose to his feet and attempted to complete the try, but it was blocked by Alex Brown. The play became immensely important later in the game, as the Lions got the ball back with 1:04 to go and 87 yards to make up a 27-23 Bears lead. Had Hanson completed his extra point, the Lions could have tied with a field goal.


Jeff Reed, Pittsburgh Steelers We didn't have to wait long for the next missed PAT. The seven year NFL veteran missed an extra-point in Washington on November 3. The Steelers had scored right before halftime on a 1-yd QB sneak by Ben Roethlisberger, who injured his arm on the play. Led by backup Byron Leftwich, the Steelers rallied again for a big drive to open up the third quarter, capped by a 1-yard TD run by Willie Parker. According to the play-by-play, Reed's PAT was wide left. This was a significant event for Reed, who had not missed a PAT since 2003, his sophormore season. Weather did not seem to be a factor; the NFL's gamebook reported 51˚F and no wind that day. Teams typically have their backup QB receving the snap on field goal attempts- was there a switch made when Leftwich entered the game? No, because Reed's holder all day was punter Mitch Berger. However, this ESPN fantasy football page notes that Berger's hold was bad. It is unknown whether Berger's botched hold has anything to do with the fact he was released following the game. He's back with the Steelers now though after four weeks as a free agent, so I guess there's not that many hard feelings.

Matt Bryant, Tampa Bay Bucs Also a seven-year NFL veteran, Bryant missed a point after last week at Carolina. Jeff Garcia had just completed a 15 yard pass to Antiono Bryant (no relation) to bring the Bucs within a touchdown at 31-23 with under two and a half minutes to go. The kicker who two years ago knocked through the third-longest field goal in NFL history (62 yards) lined up for the point-after. Julius Peppers busted through the line and blocked the kick (his seventh since entering the league in 2002, second most over this span). Bryant's subsequent onsides-kick attempt was also not successful, and Carolina went on to win the game.

So, that's it on missed PATs in the 2008 NFL season. Just nine were missed all of last year, and since 2003 (the season I grew tired of copy-pasting PAT stats) there have been 6,520 PATs, of which 6456 were made, for a grand average of 99.018% over the last five-plus seasons. So I ask, any NFL fans out there, what is the purpose of retaining the extra point? Other than tradition, what good does it do the game to have an event which is successful over 99% of the time? I can't think of a single scoreboard-impacting event in American sports that has anywhere near a 99% success rate; the closest may be the penalty kick in soccer, but that's another topic. Meanwhile, while typically you don't see defenses going all-out on the PAT unless there is something at stake, there is still the significant risk for injury to the very large men in that line of scrimmage.

On the other blogs that have discussed this, one of the objections to eliminating point-afters was that it would renew the importance of the field goal. While I don't think that's a bad thing, I think that it could just be that a touchdown is worth 7 points unless a team wants to make it 8 with a conversion attempt. Making the team play the same from-scrimmage football that got them to the end zone seems a much fairer way of handing out extra-points. And at a current rate of just 50%, the two-point conversion is much less of a sure thing.

As it stands, at the professional level, the point after try is the most worthless waste of time in modern sports.

Wigner's Friend
10-07-2010, 09:55 AM
While I was looking for stats on what percentage of Extra Points are missed, I found this article that sums up my feelings on this.

It might be a "waste of time, but even in the NFL, insanity can happen. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Od9C2dKiCI)

This is a lot like saying you should be able to intentionally walk somebody with only one pitch.

Buk Was Right
10-07-2010, 10:01 AM
Whoa whoa whoa... She's a kicker. Let's not go calling her a football "star".

Heroic Age Moe
10-07-2010, 10:11 AM
She needs to be a lesbian to make the story better.

Buk Was Right
10-07-2010, 10:17 AM
She needs to be a lesbian to make the story better.

Wow.

That's just...

Wow.

Damian696
10-07-2010, 10:18 AM
I don't understand the point of the extra point. Wouldn't getting rid of it just speed up the game? Players rarely miss. I mean, it's like what if a basketball was given a free throw after every basket. The only time it really comes into effect is when team opt for the two point conversion.

who would want to speed up the game ? it would cut down valuable commercial time.

Heroic Age Moe
10-07-2010, 10:19 AM
Wow.

That's just...

Wow.


That would be all sorts of a triple winner for news.

Or should we go back to self-rape?

Fourthman
10-07-2010, 10:21 AM
That would be all sorts of a triple winner for news.

Or should we go back to self-rape?

Self date-rape! It's a real problem.

Heroic Age Moe
10-07-2010, 10:22 AM
Self date-rape! It's a real problem.

I know man. I know.

We should make a website alerting people to it's perils!

Fourthman
10-07-2010, 10:24 AM
I know man. I know.

We should make a website alerting people to it's perils!

Nah, that's exactly the kind of thing I'd be looking for.

Ben
10-07-2010, 10:28 AM
did she go home and bang herself that night?
http://i72.photobucket.com/albums/i171/thedailynow/benaward.gif

Magnum V.I.
10-07-2010, 10:28 AM
It might be a "waste of time, but even in the NFL, insanity can happen. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Od9C2dKiCI)

This is a lot like saying you should be able to intentionally walk somebody with only one pitch.

You can intentionally walk someone with one pitch. One pitch right in the back!

Wigner's Friend
10-07-2010, 10:32 AM
You can intentionally walk someone with one pitch. One pitch right in the back!

Somebody at my high school used to do that to "save his arm".

Ultimate Lurker
10-08-2010, 09:30 AM
While I was looking for stats on what percentage of Extra Points are missed, I found this article that sums up my feelings on this.

32 NCAA FBS kickers have missed at least one extra point already this year. There are a few that have missed 3.

Natty P, Scientific Adventurer
10-08-2010, 01:21 PM
It's such a given that when one is missed it often has huge implications on the outcome of a game. Also, that there is option for 2 just makes for another wrinkle in games. If it's not broke, don't fix it. I think that last sentiment can apply to the 18 game schedule thing too.

The Human Target
10-08-2010, 01:54 PM
We breeds em svelte in these parts.

ShortStack
10-08-2010, 02:20 PM
:-) yay

Caley Tibbittz
10-08-2010, 03:08 PM
Firefox shortens this thread title to "Ohio girl becomes ho..." in my system tray.:D

J. Wilson
10-08-2010, 04:50 PM
Didn't Helen Hunt make a movie like this?

dEnny!
10-08-2010, 05:01 PM
I remember that movie with Scott Bacula & Kathy Ireland.

Mmmmm....Kathy Ireland. :drool:

dEnny!
10-08-2010, 05:09 PM
Whoa whoa whoa... She's a kicker. Let's not go calling her a football "star".

Danica Patrick is a "Racing Star," but has she ever won?

Checked wiki:

She was the 2005 rookie of the year? Ranked 12th. (coughHOTCHICKcough)

Has only won one race.

Has one zero NASCAR races.

Her best finish was 5th in 2009.

But she's a star.

In all honesty, she's the only Formula One racer I'm aware of besides Ashley Judd's husband and of course Mario Andretti...so she knows hot to market/promote herself (coughHOTCHICKcough).

Raisor
10-08-2010, 05:51 PM
In all honesty, she's the only Formula One racer I'm aware of besides Ashley Judd's husband and of course Mario Andretti...so she knows hot to market/promote herself (coughHOTCHICKcough).

Not to pick nits, but she's not an F-1 driver. INDY car and NASCAR

19bernardo87
10-09-2010, 06:53 AM
Not to pick nits, but she's not an F-1 driver. INDY car and NASCAR

Neither is Mario Andretti.

So, he really doesn't know ANY Formula One racers. :D

dEnny!
10-09-2010, 07:13 AM
Not to pick nits, but she's not an F-1 driver. INDY car and NASCAR

Oh no...I got that wrong. Obviously I've shown how much I car about race car driving. :twisted:

stevapalooza
10-09-2010, 07:20 AM
Yeah, she's awesome now. But a year from now when the tea party elects her governor of something everyone will be like "the fuck?!"

bartleby
10-09-2010, 07:23 AM
Whoa whoa whoa... She's a kicker. Let's not go calling her a football "star".


Danica Patrick is a "Racing Star," but has she ever won?

The point wasn't about whether or not she had won anything. The issue is that she's a kicker, and even the most winningest kickers are hardly thought of as football stars.

The Count
10-09-2010, 07:57 AM
I'll bet the mobsters setting the point spreads would disagree wth you. As would the guys who are "missing" who lost by a PAT and couldn't pay...

TheNatureRoy
10-09-2010, 01:26 PM
Neither is Mario Andretti.

So, he really doesn't know ANY Formula One racers. :D
Well, Mario Andretti was an extremely successful F1, IndyCar, and NASCAR driver.