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View Full Version : Did you guys know Stephen King will be writing an 8th Dark Tower book?



TheKraken
05-05-2010, 12:55 PM
I didn't, but it was apparently announced on his official website in November.


New Dark Tower Book
Posted on: 11.12.09

Stephen has announced that he has an idea for a new Dark Tower book, the working title of which will be THE WIND THROUGH THE KEYHOLE. He has not yet started this book and anticipates that it will be a minimum of eight months before he is able to begin writing it.

I saw it casually mentioned in an article about the new Ron Howard deal and was really confused for a minute. I wonder what it will be about...

Roman Noodles
05-05-2010, 12:58 PM
In November? And how did I only just hear of this last week?

Fourthman
05-05-2010, 01:16 PM
Didn't know you were a fan, Dewey. Everytime I hear that one song by Soul Coughing I hear it as "I'm Roland, I'm Roland, I'm Roland, I'm Roland-uh."

Matthew Brown
05-05-2010, 01:19 PM
Looking around the site for this, I noticed there's some game called Discordia about the Tet Corporation and their missions against Sombra. I always thought that stuff could have made a good book.

TheKraken
05-05-2010, 01:20 PM
Didn't know you were a fan, Dewey. Everytime I hear that one song by Soul Coughing I hear it as "I'm Roland, I'm Roland, I'm Roland, I'm Roland-uh."

:D

A friend of mine got me reading them in 1998. The only other King book I've ever read to the end is The Eyes of the Dragon, much later, and for obvious reasons. Never really got into Stephen King in general, but I enjoyed the Dark Tower.

Matthew Brown
05-05-2010, 01:22 PM
Ever read the Little Sisters of Eluria from Everything's Eventual? It's a cool little Roland one off story.

TheKraken
05-05-2010, 01:24 PM
Ever read the Little Sisters of Eluria from Everything's Eventual? It's a cool little Roland one off story.

I read it, but not in that book, oddly enough. I read it in this fantasy anthology called "Legends." I randomly saw it in a grocery store while on a road trip in '99. It had a painting of Roland & the Tower on the cover, so it stopped me in my tracks. :)

Howlett
05-05-2010, 01:31 PM
I heard about this last week too, and the information I found (which I'll try to find again now) was that it's set IN the Dark Tower world, but isn't actually part of the series. It's more a collection of stories set in the universe. In fact, unless I'm mistaken, it won't even actually feature Roland at all.

If I can find the info, I'll post it.

Matthew Brown
05-05-2010, 01:38 PM
I read it, but not in that book, oddly enough. I read it in this fantasy anthology called "Legends." I randomly saw it in a grocery store while on a road trip in '99. It had a painting of Roland & the Tower on the cover, so it stopped me in my tracks. :)

Ah, that's cool. I always thought they should do a volume of Dark Tower related short stories. They could put The Little Sisters in there, along with The Low Men in Yellow Coats (which depressed the crap out of me, but I loved) and Everything's Eventual which has Dinky Earnshaw. I'm sure someone could think of more... Or maybe SK could write some new ones. :D

Stark Raving
05-05-2010, 05:32 PM
He's been talking about this for a while now. If I recall, he said he wouldn't even be starting the book until the end of the year.

Fourthman
05-05-2010, 06:23 PM
I read it, but not in that book, oddly enough. I read it in this fantasy anthology called "Legends." I randomly saw it in a grocery store while on a road trip in '99. It had a painting of Roland & the Tower on the cover, so it stopped me in my tracks. :)

Legends was it's first printing[/booknerd]

GelfXIII
05-05-2010, 06:24 PM
I hope it's better than "the Dome"

MayorMitch100
05-05-2010, 06:28 PM
I just got into King, so I'm more than halfway through the first Dark Tower. But is Stephen King's idea of retirement releasing about 1 book a year?

Jacques Toochay
05-05-2010, 06:30 PM
I hope it's better than "the Dome"


That would be awesome since The Dome was a really good book.
:D

Fourthman
05-05-2010, 06:58 PM
I just got into King, so I'm more than halfway through the first Dark Tower. But is Stephen King's idea of retirement releasing about 1 book a year?

He retired from the publishing industry, not from writing. He (and Alan Moore) retired from signing contracts and multi book deals for advances. Now the case for both of them is that they write what they want when they want and sell it to whoever will buy it when the book is finished (or about to be). And in good faith, they offer it to their last publishers first.

Jacques Toochay
05-05-2010, 07:07 PM
He retired from the publishing industry, not from writing. He (and Alan Moore) retired from signing contracts and multi book deals for advances. Now the case for both of them is that they write what they want when they want and sell it to whoever will buy it when the book is finished (or about to be). And in good faith, they offer it to their last publishers first.

I gotta think that getting out of the contract grind is probably a good thing creatively speaking.

Time will tell, I guess.

HomerGator
05-05-2010, 08:27 PM
Awesome!

GelfXIII
05-05-2010, 09:25 PM
That would be awesome since The Dome was a really good book.
:D

I lost interest when I dropped the book on my head when I was reading in bed and gave myself amnesia and didn't remember if there was one single solitary character who I cared enough about to bother finding out if they lived or died.

Taxman
06-21-2011, 11:22 AM
I don't really even know how to bring this up without potentially spoiling something for someone.

One of King's new works, UR clearly crosses over with the Dark Tower. I am really not sure what the implications of this are since Dark Tower activity seemed to wrap up in 1999 and this book is set in 2010.

Roman Noodles
06-21-2011, 11:25 AM
I don't really even know how to bring this up without potentially spoiling something for someone.

One of King's new works, UR clearly crosses over with the Dark Tower. I am really not sure what the implications of this are since Dark Tower activity seemed to wrap up in 1999 and this book is set in 2010.

.... :scared:

Stark Raving
12-19-2011, 05:30 PM
Sneak peek... (http://www.tor.com/stories/2011/12/the-dark-tower-the-wind-through-the-keyhole-excerpt)

:rock:

Danger
12-19-2011, 08:16 PM
I don't really even know how to bring this up without potentially spoiling something for someone.

One of King's new works, UR clearly crosses over with the Dark Tower. I am really not sure what the implications of this are since Dark Tower activity seemed to wrap up in 1999 and this book is set in 2010.

King ties lots of his books into the Dark Tower. That series ended Roland's quest, but the Tower endures, so it makes sense that it's still kicking in UR. It, the Stand, Rose Madder, Hearts in Atlantis, Insomnia among others all tie in. His new book 11/22/63 even makes mention of an inkling of some mechanism underneath reality, and the main character also has dealings with Derry, Maine and a few characters from It, which makes it a twice removed Tower book. The various Dark Tower Marvel limited series also expand on the mythos, or retell the novels' stories. It's a pretty entertaining fictional universe, right up there with Marvel and Mass Effect.

scs
12-19-2011, 08:17 PM
I don't really even know how to bring this up without potentially spoiling something for someone.

One of King's new works, UR clearly crosses over with the Dark Tower. I am really not sure what the implications of this are since Dark Tower activity seemed to wrap up in 1999 and this book is set in 2010.A fairly large percentage of King's books overlap with the Dark Tower one way or another.

The Zevad
12-19-2011, 08:28 PM
King ties lots of his books into the Dark Tower. That series ended Roland's quest, but the Tower endures, so it makes sense that it's still kicking in UR. It, the Stand, Rose Madder, Hearts in Atlantis, Insomnia among others all tie in. His new book 11/22/63 even makes mention of an inkling of some mechanism underneath reality, and the main character also has dealings with Derry, Maine and a few characters from It, which makes it a twice removed Tower book. The various Dark Tower Marvel limited series also expand on the mythos, or retell the novels' stories. It's a pretty entertaining fictional universe, right up there with Marvel and Mass Effect.

Hmmm.

Makes you wish you could get a pink kindle eh?

PeterSparker
12-19-2011, 08:49 PM
I never finished the Dark Tower series because I heard a lot of negativity in regard to the final three books. I think at some point I should though. I'd be interested in reading this new installment. Hm

Mattman
12-19-2011, 10:07 PM
I never finished the Dark Tower series because I heard a lot of negativity in regard to the final three books. I think at some point I should though. I'd be interested in reading this new installment. Hm
Don't believe the haters. I loved the last three books. Things get crazy, and he brings in all kinds of strange "crossovers" that link the books, not just to his own body of work, but with many pop culture icons like Harry Potter and even Dr. Doom. It's crazy as fuck, but I can understand why some were turned off by it. It's very much King writing by the seat of his pants, but that last book is worth the price of admission. Even the ending (once again, fuck the haters). It's a great ride, but it's not always going to make you happy. There are things that happen that'll make you scratch your head, and there aren't very many easy answers, but oh the ride is worth it.

TIP
12-19-2011, 10:11 PM
I went to school with a Happy Potter...

Dave S.
12-19-2011, 10:17 PM
Don't believe the haters. I loved the last three books. Things get crazy, and he brings in all kinds of strange "crossovers" that link the books, not just to his own body of work, but with many pop culture icons like Harry Potter and even Dr. Doom. It's crazy as fuck, but I can understand why some were turned off by it. It's very much King writing by the seat of his pants, but that last book is worth the price of admission. Even the ending (once again, fuck the haters). It's a great ride, but it's not always going to make you happy. There are things that happen that'll make you scratch your head, and there aren't very many easy answers, but oh the ride is worth it.

I'm one of the haters. There was a major change in tone. It changed from a mysterious world full of interesting places and characters to 'it'd be cool to throw this in!', a lot of convoluted plot to try and answer the mysteries with crappy mysteries thrown in to replace them, and characters losing all their interesting personality. But that's just me. I read all the books in a short time, so I didn't have that whole anticipation thing making me eager for the 5th book.

Mattman
12-19-2011, 10:20 PM
I'm one of the haters. There was a major change in tone. It changed from a mysterious world full of interesting places and characters to 'it'd be cool to throw this in!', a lot of convoluted plot to try and answer the mysteries with crappy mysteries thrown in to replace them, and characters losing all their interesting personality. But that's just me. I read all the books in a short time, so I didn't have that whole anticipation thing making me eager for the 5th book.
I started reading the DT books in 1982 when the limited edition book 1 came out. So yeah, it's probably different when you've been waiting for so long in between books vs. people who can now just read them all with none of that waiting period. I'm reading the George R.R. Martin Game of Thrones books for the first time at the moment and people tell me it's a similar experience.

thatguyfromsyracuse
12-20-2011, 05:53 AM
Can't wait!

TheKraken
12-20-2011, 10:56 AM
A fairly large percentage of King's books overlap with the Dark Tower one way or another.

He's getting at the fact that the Dark Tower storyline took place during a specific span of years, and UR doesn't take place during that time, but seems to crossover, anyway.

The Dean
12-20-2011, 11:11 AM
I never finished the Dark Tower series because I heard a lot of negativity in regard to the final three books. I think at some point I should though. I'd be interested in reading this new installment. Hm

I guess I'm one of the haters. Like others have said, there is a serious change of tone from the the first books through Wizard and Glass to the last books. Wizard and Glass may be the best book King has ever written and I had hoped the last three would be on par, however there is a dramatic shift in lots of elements, like the settings, characters and even just the "feel" of the books. I wouldn't say the last three are terrible, but there is a dramatic shift that I'm not comfortable with.

I did not like the fact that King became a character or all of the other cultural references that made the characters aware that they were in a book. I would prefer if it kept the premise that it was it's own world that was tangentially linked to the other King books to be a "mythos," instead of a world building exercise. I think it felt kind of canned after that. It's similar to reading an Alice in Wonderland story, but she finds out that she's a character in a story, instead of letting the parody of real people stand on it's own.

Stark Raving
12-22-2011, 11:18 AM
US cover art revealed

http://i41.tinypic.com/14cy9om.jpg

Fourthman
12-22-2011, 11:27 AM
I guess I'm one of the haters. Like others have said, there is a serious change of tone from the the first books through Wizard and Glass to the last books. Wizard and Glass may be the best book King has ever written and I had hoped the last three would be on par, however there is a dramatic shift in lots of elements, like the settings, characters and even just the "feel" of the books. I wouldn't say the last three are terrible, but there is a dramatic shift that I'm not comfortable with.

I did not like the fact that King became a character or all of the other cultural references that made the characters aware that they were in a book. I would prefer if it kept the premise that it was it's own world that was tangentially linked to the other King books to be a "mythos," instead of a world building exercise. I think it felt kind of canned after that. It's similar to reading an Alice in Wonderland story, but she finds out that she's a character in a story, instead of letting the parody of real people stand on it's own.
I agree with all of this. The last three are such a departure that it dampens my anticipation for the forthcoming adaptation and 8th book (I won't be buying it in hardcover like I have the previous entries - except the first), and it really makes it difficult to recommend them to anyone. If he'd stuck the landing, people would probably not consider The Stand his greatest work.

Dave S.
12-22-2011, 02:50 PM
I sure do love The Stand though. I wish I could read that again for the first time.

Stark Raving
04-24-2012, 02:05 PM
Anyone else pick this up today?

Roman Noodles
04-24-2012, 02:08 PM
It came out today?! I still haven't finished 11-22-64! :mad:

Fourthman
04-24-2012, 02:25 PM
It came out today?! I still haven't finished 11-22-64! :mad:

He did a sequel to 11/22/63? Awesome!

Roman Noodles
04-24-2012, 02:33 PM
He did a sequel to 11/22/63? Awesome!



... :surrend:

russw
04-24-2012, 02:46 PM
As an aside, Craig Wasson did an amazing job with the audio version of 11/22/63

russw
04-24-2012, 02:47 PM
Anyone else pick this up today?

UPS delivered my copy this morning

michealdark
04-25-2012, 02:31 PM
I did not know about this at all. Does this take place after the original series with a new set of characters?

RickLM
04-25-2012, 02:33 PM
Not really on-topic, but I'm nearly done with King's book "11-22-63." Quite a good read.

Andreas
04-29-2012, 11:28 AM
I start to tell King my theory, that when people in the far future want to get an idea of how things felt between 1973 and today, they'll look to King. He's a master of reflecting the world that he sees, and recording it on the page. The rise and fall of the VCR, the arrival of Google and smartphones. It's all in there, behind the monsters and the night, making them more real.

From Neil Gaiman's interview with Stephen King for the UK Sunday Times Magazine. (http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2012/04/popular-writers-stephen-king-interview.html)

Keith P.
04-29-2012, 11:54 AM
It was decent. I felt bad for the swamp people, unfortunately I was eating while reading that part. Completely turned me of my ricotta stuffed calzone.

Stark Raving
05-05-2012, 05:05 PM
A nice list of Dark Tower connections (http://www.stephenking.com/darktower/connections/) on the new DT website.

Dark Sasha
05-05-2012, 05:07 PM
From Neil Gaiman's interview with Stephen King for the UK Sunday Times Magazine. (http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2012/04/popular-writers-stephen-king-interview.html)

Really? Today?

Taxman
05-05-2012, 06:12 PM
I did not know about this at all. Does this take place after the original series with a new set of characters?It is set between the forth and fifth book. But it is mostly storytelling set soon after the flashbacks in the fourth book and the generations before Roland was born.

TheKraken
05-06-2012, 12:03 PM
Finished this last night. Didn't even really need to be a Dark Tower book. The fairy tale in the middle could've been a short, Dark Tower-ish book like Eyes of the Dragon. I think building it up as a new chapter of the series was a mistake considering the main characters of the series are barely in it. But it was an enjoyable read.

Garth
05-06-2012, 12:23 PM
I just finished The Long Walk. Jesus, that was hardcore.

michealdark
05-06-2012, 07:00 PM
It is set between the forth and fifth book. But it is mostly storytelling set soon after the flashbacks in the fourth book and the generations before Roland was born.

Thanks. Might have to check it out

Stark Raving
05-08-2012, 06:26 PM
On a related note, this is the synopsis for DOCTOR SLEEP, the sequel to THE SHINING, coming out in January.


Stephen King returns to the characters and territory of one of his most popular novels ever, The Shining, in this instantly riveting novel about the now middle-aged Dan Torrance (the boy protagonist of The Shining) and the very special twelve-year-old girl he must save from a tribe of murderous paranormals.

On highways across America, a tribe of people called The True Knot travel in search of sustenance. They look harmless—mostly old, lots of polyester, and married to their RVs. But as Dan Torrance knows, and tween Abra Stone learns, The True Knot are quasi-immortal, living off the “steam” that children with the “shining” produce when they are slowly tortured to death.

Haunted by the inhabitants of the Overlook Hotel where he spent one horrific childhood year, Dan has been drifting for decades, desperate to shed his father’s legacy of despair, alcoholism, and violence. Finally, he settles in a New Hampshire town, an AA community that sustains him, and a job at a nursing home where his remnant “shining” power provides the crucial final comfort to the dying. Aided by a prescient cat, he becomes “Doctor Sleep.”

Then Dan meets the evanescent Abra Stone, and it is her spectacular gift, the brightest shining ever seen, that reignites Dan’s own demons and summons him to a battle for Abra’s soul and survival. This is an epic war between good and evil, a gory, glorious story that will thrill the millions of hyper-devoted readers of The Shining and wildly satisfy anyone new to the territory of this icon in the King canon.

WillieLee
05-08-2012, 06:29 PM
Why won't someone stop him?