PDA

View Full Version : The Official Writing Thread



Pages : [1] 2

Fygar
01-31-2010, 12:47 PM
I don't think we have one of these but if we do I apologize. Before I tell you what I'd like to see out of this thread, let me tell you what it is not. This is not a place to try and find an artist. We have one of those already. You can find it here:
http://www.606studios.com/bendisboard/showthread.php?t=176249

I want this to be a place for the writers of the board (anyone from an established professional to the unpublished like myself) to talk shop.

This would be the place to share an excerpt from your work. The place to ask 'Does this dialogue sound natural to you?'. If you had a productive day, come here and tell us about it. If writer's block is driving you crazy, post about in this thread to get it off your chest.

If you need to know the name of a real coffee shop in Boston, what type of fur a Viking would wear, what sound effect a belly flop would make, or if someone in the 1930's would use the phrase 'get out of here' all in an effort to make your work authentic then come in here and ask it.

Writing can be a frustrating experience and maybe if we devote a thread to the trials and tribulations we can soften the blow a bit.

mike black
01-31-2010, 12:51 PM
Good idea, however sharing anything on the board that has not already been published is sort of a legal gray area for Bendis. It might be better for us to say "Is anyone willing to give feedback on my work?" and then send it over.

LenNWallace
01-31-2010, 12:51 PM
Neat idea. I've currently got four projects going into artistic production soon. I'll find some fun stuff to share when I'm done working and cooking for the day.

Kurt Russell Crowe
01-31-2010, 01:05 PM
I totally just wrote the shit out of this post. Instead of sharing something I wrote which I'm a coward about, we should do something like write a short story collaboratively. We'll sign up or something and everyone'll have a random spot on the list and just pass it along after writing however much they feel like. Did it on Penciljack forever ago, it was a lot of fun...

mike black
01-31-2010, 01:07 PM
And, like the whore I am, I'll break the thread in with this preview from my self published novel Grinning White Teeth:

http://mikeblack.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/grinning-white-teeth-preview1.pdf

Fygar
01-31-2010, 01:17 PM
Here's where I am right now with writing.

I started a new graphic novel a couple weeks back. I have sat down to write exactly four times. For me that is horrible. Four times in two weeks is embarrassing. The thing is I had fun all four times. My process for this one is completely different than anything I've ever written. It's nine short stories under the umbrella of a major event. I am hopping around from one story to the next. When I get bored/ stuck with one story I move to a different one. I have been writing the "beats" to each story on paper and when it comes time for dialogue I grab my laptop and write it out immediately. It's been very smooth thus far.

So what is it that's keeping me from writing consistently? Surprisingly it's not Mass Effect 2 but the film 'Crazy Heart'. I haven't seen this movie yet, but I've seen the commercial a few times and know the basics of the plot. It seems pretty similar to the first story in my graphic novel. If I knew for sure I'd just scrap it and move on, but Crazy Heart isn't playing anywhere near me. I like my first story quite a bit, and it sets the tone rather nicely, but I haven't touched it once I realized how similar it may be to Crazy Heart. This is driving me nuts.

I feel like once I see Crazy Heart I can move on from this in some way or another. If it isn't all that similar I may ask a fellow board member to write some country music lyrics for me (of course they'd get a credit for the work). I just know if I attempt it they'll sound false.

Fygar
01-31-2010, 01:18 PM
I totally just wrote the shit out of this post. Instead of sharing something I wrote which I'm a coward about, we should do something like write a short story collaboratively. We'll sign up or something and everyone'll have a random spot on the list and just pass it along after writing however much they feel like. Did it on Penciljack forever ago, it was a lot of fun...

I like the idea, but it may be better suited for one of these down the road.
http://www.606studios.com/bendisboard/showthread.php?t=187164

Agree/ Disagree?

Fygar
01-31-2010, 01:19 PM
And, like the whore I am, I'll break the thread in with this preview from my self published novel Grinning White Teeth:

http://mikeblack.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/grinning-white-teeth-preview1.pdf

I would comment Mike, but for some reason I can't open it.

NATE!
01-31-2010, 01:20 PM
I'm currently planning to write the most offensive piece I possibly can and send it to the local rag.

The catch? There will be nothing that will be easily spotted as offensive (racism, sexism, etc.)

Akira
01-31-2010, 01:30 PM
Unpublished writer with about a half dozen different projects I'm working on. Most of them are comic scripts. One is closer to my heart than the others. And, not surprisingly, I have done the most work on that one. I have about 24 issues plotted out and 4 and a half written. I've been hitting a pretty bad wall recently but I'm of the mind set that I'm just gonna force my way through it and finish the f'n issue and tidy it up on a revision.

I AM GROOT!
01-31-2010, 01:34 PM
Great idea! Thanks for posting it!

Also, I just completed a two-page contribution for an anthology that will see print sometime within the next few months. In addition, I have two completed first-issue scripts that I'll probably now attempt to do an artist-search for, as well as another idea that's been bouncing around in my head for the last several months, which I may finally put on paper. Finally, I'm in the middle of the first chapter of a new novel (this one's been progressing slowly for the last couple of months because I need more concentration for it, and my time/job has kept me busy as of late).

Andreas
01-31-2010, 01:57 PM
And, like the whore I am, I'll break the thread in with this preview from my self published novel Grinning White Teeth:

http://mikeblack.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/grinning-white-teeth-preview1.pdf

Is there a reason you picked Courier instead of a more elegant typeface like Garamond? I like using Courier for Word documents myself, but I wouldn't want to read a novel set in this typeface.

Andreas

c. page
01-31-2010, 01:59 PM
at this moment i have four OGNs in various stages of production, 2 novels in the writing phase, and 2 more that are in the plotting stages, and one screenplay that i need to get around to.

and i'm not doing any writing, because i have art duties to finish first.

mike black
01-31-2010, 02:08 PM
Is there a reason you picked Courier instead of a more elegant typeface like Garamond? I like using Courier for Word documents myself, but I wouldn't want to read a novel set in this typeface.

Andreas

For some reason they were having problems formatting the book properly in Garamond. I eventually gave up after the third galley and told them just to print it as is.

LenNWallace
01-31-2010, 02:10 PM
In the absence of being able to post anything current (yet), I'll just throw up the free link to the first two chapters (22 pages) of Love Buzz on the Oni Press website. I'm sure at least two of you haven't seen it yet. ;)

http://onipress.com/preview.php?bid=378&pid=203

Enjoy!

Kedd
01-31-2010, 02:21 PM
I will whore out my two mini comics until I have a chance to post something more current.

http://revengethecomic.blogspot.com/
http://legacycomic.blogspot.com/
I have more pages for the Legacy comic, but I won't be posting them until I get the chapter completed.

Whip
01-31-2010, 04:52 PM
I have nothing to whore out yet (the magazines that had my published stuff in the past went under :( ) but I look forward to participating in this thread. *subscribes*

Fygar
02-03-2010, 09:59 AM
The first writing exercise thread is up.
http://www.606studios.com/bendisboard/showthread.php?t=188219

I had weeks to come up with something good for it and instead I did a brief exchange about streaming porn titles.

I haven't touched my graphic novel yet this week and it's already Wednesday...I have to stop slacking.

James Patrick
02-03-2010, 10:08 AM
Here's where I am:

I currently have four creator-owned books getting ready for he pitch stage. Some of the art can be seen here: http://www.606studios.com/bendisboard/showthread.php?t=187098&highlight=handler+day+phantoms

Just learned something I wrote last year is being scheduled to be published. It's cool because it's a milestone. Plus it seems they intend to have me do more.

Been hired to write a feature film from a valid producer and a major studio is probably getting involved.

And I'm trying to finish a novel i've been working on for years -- I have a about 1/5 of it left.

Benel Germosen
02-03-2010, 10:16 AM
I'm in this weird spot where I've just written two short stories and I'm going thorough the process of editing them while thinking about what else I'm going to write. I was actually going to PM some people on the board to read the first story when I'm done re-writing it for some feedback.

Len Snark
02-03-2010, 11:36 AM
I totally just wrote the shit out of this post. Instead of sharing something I wrote which I'm a coward about, we should do something like write a short story collaboratively. We'll sign up or something and everyone'll have a random spot on the list and just pass it along after writing however much they feel like. Did it on Penciljack forever ago, it was a lot of fun...

I've done this with friends before. The most successful time was when we had established beginning/end points and everyone was assigned a page or two. Such as:
First section: Starts with "The Clown smiled." Ends with "He smelled something like baby poop, but that was impossible."

Then somebody was in charge of compiling all the different parts into one story. It made for a manic depressive reading experience but the chapter begin/ends made it flow nicely.

mike black
02-09-2010, 12:51 PM
Anyone interested in reading through half of a script?

Benel Germosen
02-09-2010, 01:45 PM
Anyone interested in reading through half of a script?

Are you interested in reading the second draft of a short story?

mike black
02-09-2010, 01:57 PM
Are you interested in reading the second draft of a short story?

It might take me a few days, but sure. PM'ing contact info.

Treacle
02-09-2010, 01:57 PM
I'm not a fiction writer, but I'll bite. :)

What kind of articles would men be interested in reading on my blog?

Benel Germosen
02-09-2010, 02:30 PM
I'm not a fiction writer, but I'll bite. :)

What kind of articles would men be interested in reading on my blog?

Q&A in the style of Dear Abby, but about panties and garter belts.

michealdark
02-09-2010, 08:56 PM
Are we allowed to posts fanfics here?

Treacle
02-09-2010, 09:18 PM
Q&A in the style of Dear Abby, but about panties and garter belts.

Ah. I've done some "Ask the Addict (http://www.stockingsandlingerieblog.com/search/label/ask%20the%20addict)" features where people write me with questions and I respond on the blog. Is this what you're talking about?

Big McLargeHuge
02-10-2010, 05:12 AM
I'm not a fiction writer, but I'll bite. :)

What kind of articles would men be interested in reading on my blog?

Typically, humor is the way to go. Maybe something along the lines of "what your underwear really says about you" or some such. Something whimsical and playful.

Jef UK
02-10-2010, 06:25 AM
I have several things I'm working on right now:

I have to copy edit my article on Dean Haspeil and the Brooklyn comix scene for Overflow Magazine tonight. That will be out in March. Overflow has accepted my pitches for their summer and fall editions too.

On the weekends I'm scripting the last half of my graphic novel for Oni Press. Thank god I wrote that extensive outline! It took a year to realize the first artist was a bum and fire him, but now pages are coming in again (first 3 chapters so far), and it's been a year and half since I scripted the first 50 pages!

I just sent off the first AMERICANS UK anthology to the printers the other day. Edited and mostly written by me. 5 stories, 40 pages. It's awesome. All BenBo artists!

To that end, I've started pitching and scripting for the second antho. My goal is to have a 120 page anthology trade by the end of the year (Have got 56 so far?). I've started to get art back from HamGravy on our collaboration for Sons of Ba'al, the first script I've written for this 2nd issue.

Paul Ciaravino and I are on page 6 and 7 of AMERICANS UK #4. I do the breakdowns for that too.

I'm about to start the second leg of a short story that is so far titled, "Men Of Steel." It's near completion, but I needed to do some more research.

I will always be working on my novel, I fear. If I'm ever able to become a fulltime writer, I think I'll be able to finish the manuscript.

There's probably more. It's all about the slow burn and making sure to finish projects. I realized recently that when I finish "Men of Steel," and "Ghost Planet," I'll have a short story manuscript to pitch to agents.

Oh yeah, submitting "The Better Head" to Slice Magazine for their villains issue. It's a quarterly literary journal. I'm chummy with thier fiction editor these days.

Jef UK
02-10-2010, 06:40 AM
I need to submit to Michael Cunningham's short story website. I hear they pay $2,000 per story! And Michael used to love me.

Treacle
02-10-2010, 07:04 AM
Typically, humor is the way to go. Maybe something along the lines of "what your underwear really says about you" or some such. Something whimsical and playful.

Thanks for the suggestion. :)

The only problem with that is I am severely unfunny.

I genuinely believe trying to be funny would come across as trying too hard, and that doesn't really attract people.

Patch
02-10-2010, 07:21 AM
I'm not a fiction writer, but I'll bite. :)

What kind of articles would men be interested in reading on my blog?

Ones with pictures :D

Big McLargeHuge
02-10-2010, 07:23 AM
Thanks for the suggestion. :)

The only problem with that is I am severely unfunny.

I genuinely believe trying to be funny would come across as trying too hard, and that doesn't really attract people.

Definitely true, you don't want to TRY to be funny, because then it'll just turn into Maxim. Just futz around a bit and be playful. After all, it is a blog about underpants.

Big McLargeHuge
02-10-2010, 07:24 AM
i need to submit to michael cunningham's short story website. I hear they pay $2,000 per story! And michael used to love me.

sweet mercy!

Treacle
02-10-2010, 07:26 AM
Definitely true, you don't want to TRY to be funny, because then it'll just turn into Maxim. Just futz around a bit and be playful. After all, it is a blog about underpants.

Quite right.

I found that when I got less formal and serious, people started commenting a lot more. That's a good direction to keep going in.

Treacle
02-10-2010, 07:27 AM
Ones with pictures :D

Photo Friday (http://www.stockingsandlingerieblog.com/search/label/photo%20friday) every Friday, darling. Less text, more pictures. ;)

Patch
02-10-2010, 07:41 AM
Photo Friday (http://www.stockingsandlingerieblog.com/search/label/photo%20friday) every Friday, darling. Less text, more pictures. ;)

I have work to do, woman. I can't be looking at...

looking at...

wow

Raphael J
02-11-2010, 11:03 AM
This is geared more towards comics, but what are everyones thoughts on splash pages or the double page spread? I don't know if this is terribly accurate, but it feels like I've been seeing more and more of the both lately.

Splash pages and I have a tense love/hate relationship. When they're done right, they can bring an intense scene to its climax and really just nail an emotional point home with the reader. Far too often, once again in my opinion, they're used to just feature what is seen as a "big" moment by the creative team and fail to really resonate with this reader. Mark Millar often likes to end his books with a final page splash, which often works extremely well but sometimes just kind of thuds (a few of his Old Man Logan last pages, in particular).

Similarly, double page spreads can sometimes really deliver. For example, the recent double page spread in Siege 2, the one everyone was talking about, couldn't have been done in a single page. It was well done, showing a very important moment to both the story and the characters involved, as well as varied reactions from bystanders and important players in the story.

Obviously both have their merits, but I was curious to know how other writers tended to use them in their scripts? Do you guys favor one over the other? Where do you guys see the uses and faults in both?

Fygar
02-11-2010, 11:08 AM
This is geared more towards comics, but what are everyones thoughts on splash pages or the double page spread? I don't know if this is terribly accurate, but it feels like I've been seeing more and more of the both lately.

Splash pages and I have a tense love/hate relationship. When they're done right, they can bring an intense scene to its climax and really just nail an emotional point home with the reader. Far too often, once again in my opinion, they're used to just feature what is seen as a "big" moment by the creative team and fail to really resonate with this reader. Mark Millar often likes to end his books with a final page splash, which often works extremely well but sometimes just kind of thuds (a few of his Old Man Logan last pages, in particular).

Similarly, double page spreads can sometimes really deliver. For example, the recent double page spread in Siege 2, the one everyone was talking about, couldn't have been done in a single page. It was well done, showing a very important moment to both the story and the characters involved, as well as varied reactions from bystanders and important players in the story.

Obviously both have their merits, but I was curious to know how other writers tended to use them in their scripts? Do you guys favor one over the other? Where do you guys see the uses and faults in both?

I think they're great and a staple of comic book writing. I noticed for me I tend use splash pages more in action heavy scripts and not so much in my character driven pieces. I also like a good double splash to open up an act (particularly act 3) to let the reader know the story is about to shift in a new direction.

I scripted ten pages last night! It was nice to end the drought, but I probably won't get a chance to write the next few days since I'm socially busy...grrr.

Benel Germosen
02-11-2010, 11:12 AM
This is geared more towards comics, but what are everyones thoughts on splash pages or the double page spread? I don't know if this is terribly accurate, but it feels like I've been seeing more and more of the both lately.

Splash pages and I have a tense love/hate relationship. When they're done right, they can bring an intense scene to its climax and really just nail an emotional point home with the reader. Far too often, once again in my opinion, they're used to just feature what is seen as a "big" moment by the creative team and fail to really resonate with this reader. Mark Millar often likes to end his books with a final page splash, which often works extremely well but sometimes just kind of thuds (a few of his Old Man Logan last pages, in particular).

Similarly, double page spreads can sometimes really deliver. For example, the recent double page spread in Siege 2, the one everyone was talking about, couldn't have been done in a single page. It was well done, showing a very important moment to both the story and the characters involved, as well as varied reactions from bystanders and important players in the story.

Obviously both have their merits, but I was curious to know how other writers tended to use them in their scripts? Do you guys favor one over the other? Where do you guys see the uses and faults in both?

I think Double Splashes is a great way to show scale and setting. Using it early can really put the audience in the world, especially if the setting is a big part of the story. I would avoid using them for single moments though. I think a splash-page works well as a either an exclamation point or a strong character moment. Like the double-splash, it could use to set up a character as the focus or the center of the story. Also, I don't like when people use two splash pages per issues. I think it's overkill.

Raphael J
02-11-2010, 11:43 AM
I think they're great and a staple of comic book writing. I noticed for me I tend use splash pages more in action heavy scripts and not so much in my character driven pieces. I also like a good double splash to open up an act (particularly act 3) to let the reader know the story is about to shift in a new direction.

I scripted ten pages last night! It was nice to end the drought, but I probably won't get a chance to write the next few days since I'm socially busy...grrr.

Your use of double page splashes is pretty interesting. What do you mean by new direction? A change in tone of the story? A change in location?

I haven't written in I don't know how long. I've been trying to outline as much as possible before writing, just to get myself in the habit of knowing more or less where I want to go before I start, but it's starting to eat at me. I may just give up and write a block of pages for a couple of books I'm outlining, but I'll try to stay strong.

It's like eating hard candy and being told not to bite in to it, but wanting to terribly. It's a bad analogy, but that's how it feels.

Jef UK
02-11-2010, 12:22 PM
I love splash pages. I think they make a lot of sense for adventure comics, and it doesn't bother me when they appear a lot. I'm never too concerened with how much value I get out of a comic I am already enjoying.

I'm a really big fan of the 2 panel page, with a big anchor panel. You can get a lot of dialogue going, and actually get some story work done, while giving the weight of a splash page to the scene. I thought Paul Ciaravino and I did a good job of this in AM/UK #3 when we first get a good look at Stang. And then Ben knocked it out of the park with his lettering. That was a lot of work and Ben nailed it. Same with Jef UK and Cloyd picking up the future suit in that same issue.

You have to rely a lot more on characters acting in a 9 panel grid, where dialogue may not fit well and you have to trim excess verbiage. I think we illustrated our ability to pull this type of scene off in AM/UK #2, when Criden is being interrogated by the Old Man.

Gregory
02-11-2010, 12:24 PM
I'm writing a 4.25 x 5.5 minicomic as a series of 20 two-tier pages. It's trickier than I thought. I want an action scene and a long conversation scene at the end.

Jef UK
02-11-2010, 12:25 PM
It's like eating hard candy and being told not to bite in to it, but wanting to terribly. It's a bad analogy, but that's how it feels.

You should write what interests you when it interests you.

Writing shouldn't be a chore.

I've rarely felt any frustration with writing. If writing one thing is frustrating, then I write something else and come back to it later.

Raphael J
02-11-2010, 06:45 PM
You should write what interests you when it interests you.

Writing shouldn't be a chore.

I've rarely felt any frustration with writing. If writing one thing is frustrating, then I write something else and come back to it later.


You should write what interests you when it interests you.

Writing shouldn't be a chore.

I've rarely felt any frustration with writing. If writing one thing is frustrating, then I write something else and come back to it later.

I definitely understand where you're coming from, but the way I had been writing wasn't working for me anymore. I'd often get an idea, start writing it, and not know where I could go next. That isn't to say I don't write all my ideas now, but I just wanted to try this way out so I could learn how to do it. I'm hoping to find a happy medium between the two soon.

I think I differ from you a lot when it comes to writing (unless I'm misunderstanding what you mean when you say frustrating). I don't always like writing. I sometimes hate it and am rarely happy with what my finished product is. But, I love having written. I love getting pages
done, getting an outline finished, or coming up with a new idea that makes me rush to get it down. I just don't always like what it takes to get me there.

mike black
02-11-2010, 06:51 PM
You can't limit yourself to thinking of splash pages (or any story telling tool) in any particular way. Use splash pages to set a scene, break a big moment, because you'd love to give an artist time to stretch their wings - whatever. In the end you need to remember you're not writing for the fans, but writing for yourself, and ultimately you're the person who decides how your story is best told.

Whip
02-11-2010, 07:16 PM
You can't limit yourself to thinking of splash pages (or any story telling tool) in any particular way. Use splash pages to set a scene, break a big moment, because you'd love to give an artist time to stretch their wings - whatever. In the end you need to remember you're not writing for the fans, but writing for yourself, and ultimately you're the person who decides how your story is best told.


Words to live by.

Benel Germosen
02-11-2010, 07:53 PM
Question: I'm working on a novel. Should I wait until I finish writing the novel to find a literary agent or should I find one now while I'm still working on it?

mike black
02-11-2010, 07:58 PM
Question: I'm working on a novel. Should I wait until I finish writing the novel to find a literary agent or should I find one now while I'm still working on it?

Wait until you're finished and either deep into your second draft, or on your third. Many agents will require a manuscript sample, and others actually ask for the manuscript up front. Unless you're an established writer they won't attempt to sell a half-finished manuscript.

Fygar
02-11-2010, 10:13 PM
Your use of double page splashes is pretty interesting. What do you mean by new direction? A change in tone of the story? A change in location?

To answer your question, the times I've done the double splash to begin an act it was for both reasons. There was a major shift tonally and in location. Plus there was a big shift in time (off the top of my head, something like 23 years or so).

Fygar
02-11-2010, 10:16 PM
You have to rely a lot more on characters acting in a 9 panel grid, where dialogue may not fit well and you have to trim excess verbiage.

I agree completely. I noticed when I write a 9 panel grid it's almost always a static shot with two characters sitting/ facing the audience. I just wrote two of these said pages in a scene the other night and I've been second guessing it. It might seem like too much. They aren't back to back pages, but it's only a 5 page scene, and to have two 9 panel grids might seem jarring.

Benel Germosen
02-14-2010, 01:38 PM
I've been having trouble writing a new short story. I've been thinking I've been sounding too same-y so I stop writing for a bit until I thought something up. Well, I was writing for something or other and I came out with something I really enjoyed, so I posted it on my blog. I'll crosspost it here for people too lazy to click on the link in my sig.



There were great many things Ray never wanted to see again. Keeping Up with the Kardasians, LOLcats, People who say " Looking like a foo' with they pants on the ground ", James Van Der Beek. Among these list of things, the most highest was listed simply as HER. Her was Jenny Jurgen, a tall thin brunette with wiry glasses and a milky complexion. The reason was simple: Ray had once been in love with her.

It was not cold that day. The air was sharp in the way only winter brought and the light was dull gray and dim, but Ray was not chilly in his jumpsuit and jacket. His lips tasted the frost in the vapors that leapt from his tongue, but he had his gloves on and that was alright. He was walking down Fulson street toward the subway when he saw her. She was arm-holding a shopping bag and pushing a stroller with the blissful intent of a busy person. She walked with a happy bob. Her curls bounced with each step. Ray's heart fell out of his chest and landed in his stomach. His brow narrowed and then blood rushed to his face. He set his feet to move before she saw him. As he stepped off the corner, she called up to him and he turned. He made a show of seeming surprised, acting as if he had not noticed her coming down the street and waited as she approached.

They talked for a whole ten minutes. She talked about her husband. Ray talked about his third floor walk up and his collection of pokemon miniature. She told him how happy she was, how she was a manager at the bank and how Kayla was going to be two soon. Ray listened and said nothing. He checked his watch, made an excuse and took his leave. Jenny kissed him on his cheek before he left and she squeezed his hand. Ray smiled and turned away and when he was sure she wasn't looking he frowned and ducked his hands into his pocket.

She had done nothing but have a good life and this had crushed him somehow. He worked the afternoon in a funk until...

" Is that a dragon? " he said as he turned the corner.

And it was.

The Ray, Jenny Jurgen and a dragon all properties of Warner Bros inc., DC Entertainment and it's subsidiaries. All rights reserved. No dragons or twenty-something couriers were harmed in the making of this story.

Fygar
02-14-2010, 03:39 PM
I hope you don't mind some (minor) constructive criticism Benel.

There were great many things Ray never wanted to see again (Opening line seems slightly clunky. I think the word great might be throwing it off). Keeping Up with the Kardasians, LOLcats, People who say " Looking like a foo' with they pants on the ground ", James Van Der Beek. Among these list of things, the most (I'd get rid of the word most) highest was listed simply as HER. Her was Jenny Jurgen, a tall thin brunette with wiry glasses and a milky complexion. The reason was simple: Ray had once been in love with her.


Those are the only tiny things I noticed, everything else looks good.

Benel Germosen
02-14-2010, 05:13 PM
I hope you don't mind some (minor) constructive criticism Benel.

There were great many things Ray never wanted to see again (Opening line seems slightly clunky. I think the word great might be throwing it off). Keeping Up with the Kardasians, LOLcats, People who say " Looking like a foo' with they pants on the ground ", James Van Der Beek. Among these list of things, the most (I'd get rid of the word most) highest was listed simply as HER. Her was Jenny Jurgen, a tall thin brunette with wiry glasses and a milky complexion. The reason was simple: Ray had once been in love with her.


Those are the only tiny things I noticed, everything else looks good.

I enjoy " great many things " because it sounds like P.G Wodehouse or Terry Pratchett.

mike black
02-14-2010, 05:14 PM
I enjoy " great many things " because it sounds like P.G Wodehouse or Terry Pratchett.

I think he means you need to change it to:

"There were a great many things"

kon-el kent
02-15-2010, 10:57 AM
Does anyone have any suggestions for beginning writers? I have written short stories in the past but have recently decided to try screen, play and comic writing. Any suggestions? Any books I should read? Maybe some helpful websites?

Thanks all!

Benel Germosen
02-15-2010, 11:07 AM
I think he means you need to change it to:

"There were a great many things"

And I think you need to stop shaving in the tub. You're clogging the sink.

Fygar
02-16-2010, 11:12 PM
Hey Benel, hope I didn't upset you with critiquing your work. I honestly didn't mean to, and I hope to see more.

I scripted eleven pages tonight. It is also the third night in a row that I've written, so I think the drought may be officially over! I am feeling pretty good. I want to scream 'I'm king of the world' James Cameron style, but then I remember how douchey James Cameron is, so I refrain. I now have 37 pages of the story scripted, and its only one (of nine) of the short stories. That freaks me out, this is going to be a beast. Visually I think it might be the strongest script I've ever written.

Fygar
02-16-2010, 11:16 PM
Does anyone have any suggestions for beginning writers? I have written short stories in the past but have recently decided to try screen, play and comic writing. Any suggestions? Any books I should read? Maybe some helpful websites?

Thanks all!

The only advice I have, write everyday. I stole this sentiment from Bendis, but it is true. The longer you go without writing, the worse you get. As far as books, just check out any of the numerous comic scripts out there to get a general idea of how it's done (although there isn't a tried and true method).

Something I've noticed that really helps me, visualize your story over and over in your head even before you sit down to write. I think about my upcoming stories in the shower, before bed, while doing dishes and then when the time comes to actually write it pours out of me. If I don't think about the story prior to writing I just sit there, and it slows everything down.

Jef UK
02-17-2010, 06:21 AM
Question: I'm working on a novel. Should I wait until I finish writing the novel to find a literary agent or should I find one now while I'm still working on it?

As a rule, no literary agent will even read an unfinished manuscript. You should be shopping at least a second draft to literary agents. That's not to say that there haven't been exceptions to these rules, but you can't rely on exceptions.

Jef UK
02-17-2010, 06:23 AM
I still need to read your story, Benel. I won't forget!

In other news, I sent off my first nonfiction work for publication last weekend! I'm very happy with the article. Print edition will be out in March, with web release a couple weeks after it hits the streets.

stevapalooza
02-17-2010, 04:20 PM
Congrats! what's the article about?

michealdark
02-17-2010, 08:32 PM
Matt Bennett
Public Speaking
10/24/09
Persuasive: Comic Book Armageddon

I. Ladies and gentlemen, I love the art form we call comics. For nearly a decade, they’ve become a greater and greater part of my life. I am fascinated by the characters, the variety of styles, and the nuances that come from the combination and juxtaposition of words and images. There’s something so basic about the form, about how it harkens back to our earliest days using cave drawings to illustrate our earliest stories. In that simplicity is born a supremely detailed and complex language all its own. Sadly though, I fear that with most forms of art in this world, comics are in trouble. My goal today is to explain why I this is so and what I think can be done to solve it. There’s three ways that I’ll go about it. We’ll start by using the opinions of some of the creators and critics of comics before launching into my own ideas on what the problems are, and my own ideas on the possible solutions.

II. First of all, let’s start by looking at the opinions of some others. I sent a questionnaire to several comic book creators I know with these three questions: “Do you think the comics industry is in a state of stagnation, and if so, what can be done about it”, “There’s been a lot done in the past 30 or 40 years to legitimize comics as an art form, but I feel like has died in the last decade or so. What can be done to further the image of comics”, and “Do you see the future of comics staying as a print medium, or becoming a digital one?” I didn’t get as many responses as I expected, but I did get some from Ron Marz, writer Green Lantern, Witchblade, The Darkness, Broken Trinity, and Angelus, JT Krul (Soulfire, Fathom, and Blackest Night: Titans), and Dan DiDio, editor in chief of DC Comics.

A. Ron Marz
1. In terms of overall sales, it's stagnating because we published WAY too many superhero books, and they dominate sales.

There's more variety than there's been in a long time, but anything other than superheroes struggles to get noticed in a crowded marketplace.
2. As long as 90% of the market remains superheroes, some people will never accept comics as a viable art form and storytelling medium.
3. Both. The single-issue form will move to digital delivery, which I think will actually help in creating variety. Let's face it, 98% of the general public has no interest in reading superheroes or going into a comic shop. We need to create content they can access and are interested in. Collections will still be a physical, paper product.

B. JT Krul
1. I actually don't think comics are in stagnation. With the current economy, I actually thought comics would take a bigger hit as readers are having to deal with smaller spending budgets. The thing I would really like to see is for more independent books to crack into the higher levels. When only a handful of the top 100 books in any given month is an independent book, then that says something. And, most of those indie books are licensed properties like Star Wars, Buffy, or Conan. I'd just like to see the readership expand and draw in a greater variety of books and stories and genres. But all of this is really a sales standpoint, but that drives the business. If the sales are there, the stories will come. If not, even the best project in the world will die if they can't get more people to read it. That's just reality.
2. I don’t think it's died as an art form, but it is much harder to find something new and innovative in comics because for those past years that's what people have been trying to do. I think the real reason you might see comics losing ground artistically is because the commercial aspect of it has been heightened since the latest Hollywood blitz for properties. Once the comic world becomes so connected with movies and television and such, the less of an "art form" it might be. That is not to say that movies and television aren't art, it's seen in a different light than traditional artistic realms. Does that make sense?
3. Short of environmental factors, I don't see print media going anywhere. People said the same thing about books for the past 20 years and yet we are still buying good old-fashioned books. That being said, digital comics will expand and grow. It reminds me of the television industry. You can start a project as a web-series, but it really is a strategy for getting it onto television, where the real dollars still exist. Digital comics are the same way. It's a great medium to get the idea out there and build a fan base, draw some attention, and create a presence in the industry, but it will all lead to the printed form because that's still what sells.

C. And lastly, Dan DiDio.
1. I don’t see any stagnation in the marketplace. If anything we’re entering into one of the more transformative times in the industry.
2. IN my opinion comics don’t receive legitimacy by being considered an art form, but by being clearly identified as a leader in pop culture phenomenon.
3. Why does it have to be either/or? I believe print and digital can work well side by side and grow together.

D. As you can see, opinions to my questionnaire varied widely, but I think that’s a good thing for something like this. It’s nice to see the opposing side given some time.

III. Now that we’ve covered that, let me explain what I think are the problems facing comics today.

A. This first one is stagnation.
1. To me, besides the obviousness that all art is about expression, I think art is also about progress.
2. This is especially true of the late 19th and the 20th centuries, when comics first emerged. The entirety of art was in a state of flux, and the age of Modernism was in bloom. Music was becoming more violent and discordant. Photography was still in its height of development. It was the golden age of silent cinema, the time for experimentalism in poetry and literature, the age of Dada and the Bauhaus, and the time for the popularity of abstraction in the visual arts.
3. Sadly, if you look at comics though, there hasn’t been much progress in comics, in terms of experimenting with the form.
a. There’s been a few renegades determined to push the boundaries of what one can do with the form, such as art spiegleman and Francoise Mouly of Raw Magazine, Harvey Kurtzman with Mad, Will Eisner in his graphic novels, and Moebius and Richard Corben with Heavy Metal and its original French version Metal Erlong., but by and large the form is still the same.
b. The comic book is still just an expanded version of the comic strip, with most of the innovation coming in trying to come up with interesting panel arrangement.

B. The second major problem I see in comics today is the over-reliance on the “grim and gritty” formula.
1. I should probably first explain what I mean here.
a. Stan Lee, with the development of the Fantastic Four in 1961, set out to create a new era in comics to counter the stagnation of the 50’s caused by a Senate hearing trying to tie comics to juvenile delinquency and the absolutely vile self-censoring organization, the Comics Code Authority, by trying create more realistic heroes with foibles and troubles of their own and a more naturalistic (if at time a bit verbose) speaking style.
b. In his wake, creators started to tackle more mature themes and adding more and more layers to their characters. For example, Dennis “Denny” O’Neil brought Batman back to his original 1939 roots as a ruthless, obsessive detective and avenger against crime, while in Green Lantern/Green Arrow, he used comics to tackle issues like drug addiction, Native American rights, racism, and environmentalism. Meanwhile at Marvel, Gerry Conway shocked the world by killing off Spider-man’s first truly great love, Gwen Stacy, at the hands of his greatest enemy: Norman Osborne, the Green Goblin.
c. By the time we got to the mid-80’s, this exploration of deeper characterization and story had taken a turn towards all heroes having to be these brooding, damaged figures without any traditional heroic values at all, and the stories we now about cruelty and darkness without the normal heroics light to balance it out.
2. Sadly, this trend is still with us today, despite efforts by the likes of kurk buizIaueie and Scott McCloud to change it in the 90’s. It’s a burnt out trend that killed the traditional values of the hero.

C. The last problem I want to talk about is the lack of variety in the market.
1. As Ron Marz was quick to point out, there’s more variety on the market now than there’s been in quite a long time. Crime comics are especially popular again. With the raise of manga (Japanese comics), romance and high school dramas and horror comics have also experienced something of resurgence.
2. As he, Scott McCloud, and were also quick to point out, superheroes are still the dominate books on the market.
3. Let me make it clear that I love superheroes. I mean LOVE superheroes. But I mean come on! How can one expect greater levels in story, art, and characterization if the only thing selling is something with a recognized style that has remained basically unchanged for the past 70 years?!

IV. Well now that we know the problems, what solutions can we come up with?
A. Since we started with stagnation of form, let’s see what we can do with it.
1. The first thing that comes to mind is to promote the creation and popularization of more original graphic novels.
a. A definition of the term “graphic novel” may be in order here.
b. A graphic novel is a long form, square bound comic, told as one whole chunk, lasting anywhere from twice the length of a monthly comic (44 pages) on up. It’s meant to be a complete narrative with a clear beginning, middle, and end.
c. A lot of the great works in the comics genre in the last 30 years have been graphic novels, but at the same time they’re still not recognized as well as a should be. Mainly because they take a long time to make, and cost a lot to promote when they come out because they hit as many traditional bookstore shelves as they do comic shop shelves. This has meant that most of the best known “graphic novels”, including Watchmen and Ghost World, have actually been collections miniseries and major story arcs from ongoing series.
d. But I truly feel that if more money was spent on doing original graphic novels, and promoting them, it would allow for a great creative outlet for creators and help to further legitimatize comics for the mainstream public.
2. Another good one would be to support the formalist/experimental artists.
a. We need to support artists that really want to push the art form forward. Such artists as art spiegelman and Matt Madden and Chris Ware, who do wild things with story, panel design, layout, should be artists that get more mainstream attention.
B. Second of all, for the love of all that is good there needs to be a moratorium on “grim and gritty”.
1. It’s a style that’s become silly, repetitive, and without anything further of substance to say.
2. What was revolutionary in 1986 has just become boring in 2009.
3. See, I thought what this style was about was to create more mature stories with deeper characters. Instead it’s just gotten us into a world of depression and brooding and characters so emo that even those creeps from Twilight would laugh them out of the building. I say NO! I say it’s time for something different.
C. Lastly, we need more variety on the market still.
1. I’m thankful that we have the variety we do today, but we could still use more.
2. While crime comics are very popular again, we could stand a few more romance comics on the shelves again outside of just Strangers in Paradise, Spider-man Loves Mary Jane, and some translated manga titles. How about some sports comics? Or more sci-fi? I think the market could handle the load. With over 200 superhero titles out there, we definitely don’t need any more of those.

V. So that brings me to the end of our little talk tonight. I hate to be overbearing on this topic, but I really do love this art form and it hurts my heart as a fan to see it in a state of decay. As a fan, and someone who wants to be involved someday, I can’t just sit back and let it die. Just as I can’t sit back and allow any other form of art die. While I talked about comics tonight, just be glad I don’t know anyone making horror films to help me out. If you thought this was long, I could guarantee you that a speech on the sorry state of horror films today would have taken a whole class period and then some. But I digress. Anyways, I thank you for your infinite patience with me tonight. Have yourselves a good night.

Benel Germosen
02-17-2010, 08:51 PM
I still need to read your story, Benel. I won't forget!

In other news, I sent off my first nonfiction work for publication last weekend! I'm very happy with the article. Print edition will be out in March, with web release a couple weeks after it hits the streets.

No worries, Jef. You are a whirling dynamo of funk and I am envious of your ability to get shit done.

mike black
02-20-2010, 10:14 AM
Just finished the OGN script last night.

Second draft starts this week!

Benel Germosen
02-20-2010, 10:42 AM
just finished the ogn script last night.

Second draft starts this week!

:d

mike black
02-20-2010, 10:47 AM
:d

:mistrust:

I don't know what that smiley is supposed to mean. :lol:

Benel Germosen
02-20-2010, 10:50 AM
:mistrust:

I don't know what that smiley is supposed to mean. :lol:

It's suppose to be big grin but the board won't read it for some reason.

Anyway, congrats. I should be working on " Married and Buried " right now.

mike black
02-20-2010, 02:33 PM
It's suppose to be big grin but the board won't read it for some reason.

Anyway, congrats. I should be working on " Married and Buried " right now.

Did you go back for a second draft on the Shinigami thing? I took vacation this week to do a second on Genocide this week so I'll have some free time to read over it again if you want.

Benel Germosen
02-20-2010, 11:28 PM
Did you go back for a second draft on the Shinigami thing? I took vacation this week to do a second on Genocide this week so I'll have some free time to read over it again if you want.

I want to get some more feedback before I start revising it again. I sent a copy to Travis and Jef, so I'm waiting on them to hit me back about it.

RickLM
02-21-2010, 08:55 PM
Have you guys seen this website: www.stickK.com ?

It's an online anti-procrastination tool. I heard about it when CBS Sunday Morning did a segment on procrastination.

My credit card is nicked for a $20 donation to the NRA for each week that I don't write at least 20 pages. (You can choose a charity you strongly dislike as added motivation.) So basically, for the next year, I have to keep churning things out to keep from losing the money.

mike black
02-22-2010, 03:50 PM
I want to get some more feedback before I start revising it again. I sent a copy to Travis and Jef, so I'm waiting on them to hit me back about it.

Ah, alright. Can't wait to see what comes of it!

Jef UK
02-22-2010, 03:54 PM
Congrats! what's the article about?

Dean Haspiel and the burgeoning Brooklyn cartoonist / comix scene.

Thanks!

Fygar
02-26-2010, 05:35 PM
So I finished the first chapter of my graphic novel last week (actually it's the seventh chapter but first I've written) and I'm pretty pleased with it. It took me another 3 days to type it out which sucks but I wanted to get that out of the way before starting the next piece. I got good feedback from Rosemary's Baby which felt good because despite being my best friend he's also my harshest critic.

I have questions for you guys though.

Where do you write? Do you write in the same place every time? Are you particular about where you write? And what time of day do you write?

I noticed setting a schedule really helped me with this chapter. I have been writing very late at night (typically 1am to 3 or sometimes 4) and in the same place. I'm staying with a friend of a friend right now until I get back on my feet and he has an awesome dining room. He has this massive table that is perfect for writing. I always need a lot of space to lay everything out in front of me, and the room HAS to be clean (I'm like this for everything though...playing video games, watching movies etc).

mike black
02-26-2010, 05:47 PM
So I finished the first chapter of my graphic novel last week (actually it's the seventh chapter but first I've written) and I'm pretty pleased with it. It took me another 3 days to type it out which sucks but I wanted to get that out of the way before starting the next piece. I got good feedback from Rosemary's Baby which felt good because despite being my best friend he's also my harshest critic.

I have questions for you guys though.

Where do you write? Do you write in the same place every time? Are you particular about where you write? And what time of day do you write?

I noticed setting a schedule really helped me with this chapter. I have been writing very late at night (typically 1am to 3 or sometimes 4) and in the same place. I'm staying with a friend of a friend right now until I get back on my feet and he has an awesome dining room. He has this massive table that is perfect for writing. I always need a lot of space to lay everything out in front of me, and the room HAS to be clean (I'm like this for everything though...playing video games, watching movies etc).

I get the most work done in my office, with my notebook sitting on my desk in front of my desktop monitor. I use my desktop as a media box, shut the door with a pack or two of Blacks, maybe a beer or some vodka, and just start banging shit out.

Earlier this week I was able to get twenty something pages out in about three hours fueled by two bottles of Yuengling and jamming EYEHATEGOD and Weedeater.

I used to be better suited to writing at night, but if I'm home for the day, and get started writing around noon I can get some serious output going by five or six.

mike black
02-28-2010, 09:49 AM
Productive week for me so far. Finished the script for one OGN, plotted and started another. I think I'm getting trashed tonight.

Fygar
03-02-2010, 09:56 AM
Anyone have a link as to what a music video script looks like? That's our upcoming writing challenge tomorrow and I've never tackled anything like it. I already have a plot/ song in my mind, but have no idea how to go about it.

Jef UK
03-02-2010, 11:03 AM
Anyone have a link as to what a music video script looks like? That's our upcoming writing challenge tomorrow and I've never tackled anything like it. I already have a plot/ song in my mind, but have no idea how to go about it.

I think the real work there would be done as storyboards working from a brief description of what's supposed to happen, or just from whatever the director has in mind. I don't think there's a real need for a script in music videos.

Jef UK
03-02-2010, 11:12 AM
I had to trim 500 words from my magazine article! It was like liposuctioning one's baby!

My buddy Zees and I are working on a humurous superhero-noir short story, titled, "The Gentleman No More!" for the second AM/UK anthology. I'm returning to a series of scripts I wrote under the monikor of Just Super (my take on the "realistic super-hero" subgenre), which I submitted to get the Details gig I had a few years ago. They didn't want to go with supes, so I had to write 3 more pitches and let them pick. But I dug the scripts and universe that I was building (it was way better than what we actually did for them, sadly), so I've been sending them out into the world ever since, and now have Zees on board!

Use everything!! Writing is work!!! Hang on to your work!!!!

Raphael J
03-02-2010, 11:19 AM
I'm working on a story that shows four groups of characters, who for the first part of the book are doing on their own thing, that meet in the midst of a crisis and have to work together to survive. I was recently talking it out with a friend and came to the startling conclusion that a set of characters in the book muddled the voices of another group of characters. They were different, in my head, but in the writing they didn't come out like I wanted. Rather than have the two in the book, I decided to cut one gorup (three characters) out of my story completely. I had a few scenes of theirs written out, but this was before the characters met and I just couldn't see how the two would exist without carrying the same story beats.

It was not fun.

Jef, I feel your pain.

Fygar
03-02-2010, 11:22 AM
I'm working on a story that shows four groups of characters, who for the first part of the book are doing on their own thing, that meet in the midst of a crisis and have to work together to survive. I was recently talking it out with a friend and came to the startling conclusion that a set of characters in the book muddled the voices of another group of characters. They were different, in my head, but in the writing they didn't come out like I wanted. Rather than have the two in the book, I decided to cut one gorup (three characters) out of my story completely. I had a few scenes of theirs written out, but this was before the characters met and I just couldn't see how the two would exist without carrying the same story beats.

It was not fun.

Jef, I feel your pain.

It may not have been fun, but it sounds like it was essential to the story and it will benefit in the long run. Look on the bright side, at least you didn't abandon it once the going got tough.

Raphael J
03-02-2010, 11:25 AM
It may not have been fun, but it sounds like it was essential to the story and it will benefit in the long run. Look on the bright side, at least you didn't abandon it once the going got tough.

Oh, of course not. The story will be much tighter and stronger without them. They just don't have a home now, so until I figure something out they're in Grant Morrison's limbo.

Fygar
03-03-2010, 09:12 AM
I wrote for 90 minutes last night and fleshed out the sixth chapter of my graphic novel. I wanted to write longer but was getting tired. I got quite a bit done in that short amount of time though. I need new music, I keep listening to the same albums when I work and it's getting annoying.

Jef UK
03-03-2010, 11:00 AM
I wrote for 90 minutes last night and fleshed out the sixth chapter of my graphic novel. I wanted to write longer but was getting tired. I got quite a bit done in that short amount of time though. I need new music, I keep listening to the same albums when I work and it's getting annoying.

90 minutes is a lot! Nice work.

Benel Germosen
03-06-2010, 10:44 AM
Finished a short story. Whoever wants to check it out before I start editing it can PM me. It's called " Married and Buried ".

mike black
03-10-2010, 07:54 PM
A little interlude in my latest script:

"The night is sticky and dense, thick warm air and crushing heat. My face aches. My joints ache. My jaw, my muscles, my bones shake and seethe with each heart beat. Jean smells like he hasn't washed in weeks.

In dimly lit alleys, brimming with garbage kicked around by pedestrians, transvestite lovers steel a moment. Jean nods to a clutch of heroin addicts sticking each other with used needles and sips on his cup. I catch a twinkle in his eye as we pass; a long, lustful stare. A racist street preacher stands on a wooden box, spitting rhetoric through a baby blue bullhorn.

The city destroys itself and and rebuilds every night. Hurricanes drill the landscape and the population lurches to life and saves itself again. The region wheezes and coughs up blood on the carpet; it rolls over on it's side sighing for a time when it was paid for sex. Knees caked in dirt, and nose caked in blow.

The south is more than advertised."

I can't tell if my subconscious is channeling Ginsberg or if I've just been listening to too much Dax Riggs (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iKIGncSpk3U&feature=PlayList&p=95513600793CC892&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=21).

mike black
03-11-2010, 04:28 PM
Why is it that all the good ideas come when you're at work?

Akira
03-11-2010, 04:43 PM
Why is it that all the good ideas come when you're at work?

Tell me about it!

Benel Germosen
03-11-2010, 05:47 PM
What are everyone's thoughts on ellipses, pauses and filler-words? Is there ever a point where "..." or " Um/Er/Eh " ever appropriate? Does dialog with those elements sound like it's trying to hard?

mike black
03-11-2010, 05:59 PM
What are everyone's thoughts on ellipses, pauses and filler-words? Is there ever a point where "..." or " Um/Er/Eh " ever appropriate? Does dialog with those elements sound like it's trying to hard?

Avoid elipses in formal writing, it's lazy and the desired effect (a gentle trail off, a pregnant moment, etc,) are better served through your words than the imagination of the reader.

"Um/Er/Eh" is fine. Those are "words", audible sounds that people use all the time. Everyone has their own style for dialogue, so it's really up to you.

Benel Germosen
03-11-2010, 06:06 PM
Avoid elipses in formal writing, it's lazy and the desired effect (a gentle trail off, a pregnant moment, etc,) are better served through your words than the imagination of the reader.


Does this extend to dialog?

mike black
03-11-2010, 06:47 PM
Does this extend to dialog?

As in comics? If that's the case, then they're fine. In prose they don't have a place.

Benel Germosen
03-11-2010, 10:36 PM
As in comics? If that's the case, then they're fine. In prose they don't have a place.

I dunno about that one.

Fygar
03-17-2010, 11:30 PM
So what is it that's keeping me from writing consistently? Surprisingly it's not Mass Effect 2 but the film 'Crazy Heart'. I haven't seen this movie yet, but I've seen the commercial a few times and know the basics of the plot. It seems pretty similar to the first story in my graphic novel. If I knew for sure I'd just scrap it and move on, but Crazy Heart isn't playing anywhere near me. I like my first story quite a bit, and it sets the tone rather nicely, but I haven't touched it once I realized how similar it may be to Crazy Heart. This is driving me nuts.

YES! I saw Crazy Heart yesterday, and it has very few similarities to my story (plus it was highly enjoyable). I'll probably finish my second chapter in the next few days. I have been working pretty consistently on it, and thus far it's went smoothly.

I wrote for a couple hours today, and I'm not totally satisfied with the dialogue I came up with. I'll have to give it another once over tomorrow.

I've been re-reading Story the last few weeks. I am getting way more out of it this time around as opposed to when I read it a few years ago. I've written a lot more since then, and the concepts make way more sense to me now.

NeverWanderer
03-18-2010, 12:14 AM
Great idea for a thread! I love reading about other writers doing the work -- it's inspirational. :)

Last weekend, my wife and I drove down to San Diego for a friend's birthday party, and on the way, I broke my laptop out to get some writing done. I ended up having a breakthrough on the pitch synopsis for my (long, long, long in production) sci-fi comic, The Link. Being able to talk it out with my wife, test the way things sounded, and get her input on the clarity of the words... I found it extremely helpful. The synopsis is down to less than a page, finally!

Only problem is, upon going back and rereading it, it seems dry as burnt toast to me. :?

I'll continue to work on it.

Question for you guys: When writing synopses for pitches, do you ever worry that, without explaining the cause and effect of certain story events, an editor will just think you're a bad storyteller? I keep wanting to elaborate on *why* certain things happen, just so they know I've thought it all out, but doing so can turn a sentence into a paragraph.

mike black
03-20-2010, 08:17 PM
Finished the first chapter of a new script. It's a little outside my comfort zone, but I think it worked well.

mike black
03-20-2010, 08:19 PM
Great idea for a thread! I love reading about other writers doing the work -- it's inspirational. :)

Last weekend, my wife and I drove down to San Diego for a friend's birthday party, and on the way, I broke my laptop out to get some writing done. I ended up having a breakthrough on the pitch synopsis for my (long, long, long in production) sci-fi comic, The Link. Being able to talk it out with my wife, test the way things sounded, and get her input on the clarity of the words... I found it extremely helpful. The synopsis is down to less than a page, finally!

Only problem is, upon going back and rereading it, it seems dry as burnt toast to me. :?

I'll continue to work on it.

Question for you guys: When writing synopses for pitches, do you ever worry that, without explaining the cause and effect of certain story events, an editor will just think you're a bad storyteller? I keep wanting to elaborate on *why* certain things happen, just so they know I've thought it all out, but doing so can turn a sentence into a paragraph.

You don't have to go ultra in depth with synopsis - they're there just to let the editor know that you can form a long form story and give them a feel for the work. That's why so many writers have issues with synopsis - it's really hard to boil a longform work down to a few hundred words after you've just spilled your guts all over the page. Everything seems important. ;)

Benel Germosen
03-20-2010, 10:13 PM
You don't have to go ultra in depth with synopsis - they're there just to let the editor know that you can form a long form story and give them a feel for the work. That's why so many writers have issues with synopsis - it's really hard to boil a longform work down to a few hundred words after you've just spilled your guts all over the page. Everything seems important. ;)

Yup. That's why it's important to, after work, just let it lay there. Don't fucking fiddle with it. Don't even so much as look at it. Get something else going on. Then after time has passed and you don't feel so attached to the project, you can go back and check it out again.

NeverWanderer
03-20-2010, 10:22 PM
You don't have to go ultra in depth with synopsis - they're there just to let the editor know that you can form a long form story and give them a feel for the work. That's why so many writers have issues with synopsis - it's really hard to boil a longform work down to a few hundred words after you've just spilled your guts all over the page. Everything seems important. ;)


Yup. That's why it's important to, after work, just let it lay there. Don't fucking fiddle with it. Don't even so much as look at it. Get something else going on. Then after time has passed and you don't feel so attached to the project, you can go back and check it out again.

Distancing myself enough has definitely been my problem. In another thread, someone (I think Jef UK) mentioned that writing the proposal is about "Telling" the story, instead of "Showing" the story. It's taken me a good long time to figure out how to do that (and do it interestingly). BUT, as of this morning, I think I've got it to a good place. I'm at less than a page, with the story summed up in about three paragraphs and a tag line, and I think (I hope), it will hook peoples' interest.

I've got it out to a few people whose knowledge and opinions I trust, so hopefully I'll hear good things back from them.

Benel Germosen
03-20-2010, 10:53 PM
I've got it out to a few people whose knowledge and opinions I trust, so hopefully I'll here good things back from them.

Speaking of trusting the knowledge of others. I got a short story that needs perusing. Want to check it out?

NeverWanderer
03-20-2010, 11:30 PM
Speaking of trusting the knowledge of others. I got a short story that needs perusing. Want to check it out?

Absolutely!

mike black
03-21-2010, 07:47 PM
Distancing myself enough has definitely been my problem. In another thread, someone (I think Jef UK) mentioned that writing the proposal is about "Telling" the story, instead of "Showing" the story. It's taken me a good long time to figure out how to do that (and do it interestingly). BUT, as of this morning, I think I've got it to a good place. I'm at less than a page, with the story summed up in about three paragraphs and a tag line, and I think (I hope), it will hook peoples' interest.

I've got it out to a few people whose knowledge and opinions I trust, so hopefully I'll hear good things back from them.

Remember, it's not just telling the story, but introducing yourself and why you wrote it. The SFWA wrote a good piece on synopsis. Check it out. (http://www.sfwa.org/members/bell/writingtips/winter0102.html) And here is a second one (http://www.sfwa.org/members/bell/writingtips/summer08.html).

mike black
03-22-2010, 08:47 AM
Anyone have any rituals for celebrating finishing a project?

mike black
03-22-2010, 09:27 AM
Poetry has never been my strong suit, but I wanted to give it a go for the new project. Sat down and banged this out, not sure how well it works.

In between the skulls, stacked twelve stories high,
the brackish pools, cypress walls, and mossy carpet,
fluttering reptile covens, and cloudy gray sky,
Stand, man, stand damn tall against the windy cry.

Street corner physicians and by the hour
girlfriends blow kisses and whisper love.
The weak and poor huddle together and cower,
and spit obscene shit, and scream “It's now or
never.”

Mankind is unkind, man.
Hustlers rape and politicians bribe,
and fuck you cause they can.
Mankind is unkind, man.

Southern discomfort comes in waves,
Twos and threes cheap clinic connections circle
and drip yellowy heaven that saves,
Trip hard a path that blazes and paves.

Personal mayhem and a path to kill,
Your best friend drugged and out on the floor
Artful revival paramedic skill,
and you don't care that his hearts still
beating.

Mankind is unkind, man.
Don't you hate this town and this life,
the fucking dirty air and swamp land.
Mankind is unkind, man.

NeverWanderer
03-22-2010, 10:33 AM
Remember, it's not just telling the story, but introducing yourself and why you wrote it. The SFWA wrote a good piece on synopsis. Check it out. (http://www.sfwa.org/members/bell/writingtips/winter0102.html) And here is a second one (http://www.sfwa.org/members/bell/writingtips/summer08.html).

Those articles are fantastic. Thanks for sharing!


Anyone have any rituals for celebrating finishing a project?

I joyfully tell everyone I know that it's finally done, and then stare at a blank computer screen for a few months.


Poetry has never been my strong suit, but I wanted to give it a go for the new project. Sat down and banged this out, not sure how well it works.

In between the skulls, stacked twelve stories high,
the brackish pools, cypress walls, and mossy carpet,
fluttering reptile covens, and cloudy gray sky,
Stand, man, stand damn tall against the windy cry.

Street corner physicians and by the hour
girlfriends blow kisses and whisper love.
The weak and poor huddle together and cower,
and spit obscene shit, and scream “It's now or
never.”

Mankind is unkind, man.
Hustlers rape and politicians bribe,
and fuck you cause they can.
Mankind is unkind, man.

Southern discomfort comes in waves,
Twos and threes cheap clinic connections circle
and drip yellowy heaven that saves,
Trip hard a path that blazes and paves.

Personal mayhem and a path to kill,
Your best friend drugged and out on the floor
Artful revival paramedic skill,
and you don't care that his hearts still
beating.

Mankind is unkind, man.
Don't you hate this town and this life,
the fucking dirty air and swamp land.
Mankind is unkind, man.

I dunno enough about poetry to give it useful critique, but for what it's worth, I like it. :)

mike black
03-22-2010, 01:56 PM
Those articles are fantastic. Thanks for sharing!



I joyfully tell everyone I know that it's finally done, and then stare at a blank computer screen for a few months.



I dunno enough about poetry to give it useful critique, but for what it's worth, I like it. :)

Neither were the article I was thinking about, but they get the point across. ;)

I plan on drinking copiously tonight, picked up a new pipe at the head shop, and trying to track down some green.

I appreciate it, man. I'm not really big on poetry and so I was excited about the challenge of writing poetry in the voice of a character as a buttress the story. I think I might go back and rework the narration to fit the same style.

Kedd
03-23-2010, 07:22 PM
Speaking of trusting the knowledge of others. I got a short story that needs perusing. Want to check it out?

Just sent something your direction, Benel.

Jef UK
03-23-2010, 08:36 PM
Here's that magazine article I wrote. It hit the streets while I was at SXSW!

http://man-size.livejournal.com/475787.html

Benel Germosen
03-23-2010, 11:14 PM
Just sent something your direction, Benel.

Read it. Replied.

Dude, this could get awesome.

Benel Germosen
03-23-2010, 11:15 PM
Anyone have any rituals for celebrating finishing a project?

I masterbate furiously.

Fygar
03-23-2010, 11:49 PM
Anyone have any rituals for celebrating finishing a project?

I finished the second chapter of my graphic novel a few minutes ago. To answer your question Mike, I typically raise my arms in celebration after putting the final word to paper. I always get a big smile on my face, and then start the whole process over the very next day...ugh ;-)

This chapter ended up being 70 comic pages so add that with the previous chapter and I'm already up to 129. The longest graphic novel I'd ever written prior to this was 135 pages, and I still have 7 chapters to write for this one. I know length doesn't equal quality (obviously) but I am really proud of this thus far. My goal is to always make my latest work the best thing I've ever written (don't we all?) and so far I think this has the potential. It'll be a monster to edit and put together, but I honestly can't wait.

I tried to write in the day yesterday, and that didn't work out at all. I got eight pages done, which isn't bad, but my mind was elsewhere the entire time. I kept counting how many pages I'd done. I focus way better late at night, and I don't know why that is. I don't worry about anything else, and just keep going until it feels like an appropriate time to stop.

c. page
03-24-2010, 12:08 AM
Anyone have any rituals for celebrating finishing a project?

if it's a comic project, i usually begin the long and arduous task of drawing it.

if it's something else (novel, screenplay, etc), normally i would drink. but given that i'm going dry for a year, i shall have to find some other way to celebrate.

mike black
03-26-2010, 04:16 PM
if it's a comic project, i usually begin the long and arduous task of drawing it.

if it's something else (novel, screenplay, etc), normally i would drink. but given that i'm going dry for a year, i shall have to find some other way to celebrate.

Dry?! As a writer?!

Fygar
03-27-2010, 08:03 PM
I just wrote for five and a half hours and now my brain is mush. I haven't written for that long in a single sitting in a very long time. 51 comic book pages of panel descriptions and about an hour's worth of formatting. If I had to write page wide panel, over the shoulder, or bird's eye view one more time...I'd probably throw up.

mike black
03-30-2010, 07:38 AM
I got incredibly high with a writer friend of mine last night, and woke up to this on a notepad in my hand writing:

Hip fire killer lyer solo reverberates in to the sun skipping off the asphalt,
settle in and enjoy the wind whipping through your hair and taste the salt
of the sweat on your lips.
Mississippi River, son, trippy hiss kisses your ears,
it's the motor run.

I really don't remember writing that.

Raphael J
03-31-2010, 11:19 AM
Can you guys teach me the writing tricks that are apparently the key to getting published? I think I can get lucky, but without these tricks I'm nowhere!

mike black
03-31-2010, 06:57 PM
I TORTURE THEE WITH MORE POETRY.

Rust assured and come on pure
like a hurricane,
single name whispered
in history - forever.
Trampled under foot
and sisterhood
seemed brighter yesterday.
Didn't it?

Arion
03-31-2010, 07:12 PM
I masterbate furiously.

Really?

Jef UK
03-31-2010, 08:35 PM
I talked to my editor at Oni today, and I have to turn in 100 pages of script by the end of April!

c. page
03-31-2010, 08:59 PM
Dry?! As a writer?!

yeah, haven't tried the writing yet. we'll see how it goes.

Benel Germosen
03-31-2010, 09:27 PM
Really?

:mistrust:



:no:

Benel Germosen
03-31-2010, 09:29 PM
Let's talk about tropes.

What have tropes do you like to use in your writing? What recurring things do you do alot?

Partnerships: I enjoy the idea of partnerships and the relationship between two people.

Weirdness: I like weird shit. The weirder, the better. I have a short story that's 7000 words all about two travelers walking the road thorough Sheol.

Jef UK
03-31-2010, 09:36 PM
Let's talk about tropes.

What have tropes do you like to use in your writing? What recurring things do you do alot?

Partnerships: I enjoy the idea of partnerships and the relationship between two people.

Weirdness: I like weird shit. The weirder, the better. I have a short story that's 7000 words all about two travelers walking the road thorough Sheol.

I realize I deal with transformation and identity a lot.

NeverWanderer
03-31-2010, 09:54 PM
Tropes... I dunno if I'm clear enough on the definition (even after just reading it), but I'll take a shot at it anyway. :)

Amnesia - I'm pretty fascinated by the what memory loss can do to a person, and how they might evolve as a result of it. I've got at least three stories where the main characters have amnesia (including the one I'm currently working on), though I think I'm exploring it in a different enough way in all three that I'm not just repeating myself.

Man Against Nature - I very rarely have a singular villain in my stories. More often than not, it's the main character against a larger amorphous entity or the environment itself. Could be due to my natural desire to see the best in people, or it could be due to some deep-seated persecution complex. Probly both. :p

I do WANT to tell more stories with villains. I love a good villain. I just tend to like exploring the hero more (which is probly a side-effect of being a role-player).

Interpersonal Relationships - Much like you, Benel, I love exploring human interactions, whether they be romantic, friendly, or antagonistic. That's ALWAYS a focus in my stories (and I would think is also a result of my role-playing background).

Pacing - Dunno if this counts as a trope, exactly... but I place a very HEAVY emphasis on pacing in my stories. The delivery of the story is as important to its success as the content. Come to think of it... that's probly not a trope.

Fygar
04-01-2010, 01:11 AM
Let's talk about tropes.

What have tropes do you like to use in your writing? What recurring things do you do alot?

Awesome question!

Male/ male friendships - I don't know what it is, but I explore men bonding with each other all the time. I've noticed that dudes losing or gaining friends has been a consistent theme in a lot of my work.

Death - Impending doom, not living life to the fullest, dying unexpectedly, trying to understand death etc. This permeates through pretty much everything I've ever written.

Reflections/ mirrors - This is more of a visual cue than it is a theme/ trope, but I've noticed it pops up frequently in my work (probably too much).

dmh3000
04-01-2010, 01:36 AM
I have a writing sample in my sig (The Kid Intense vs Punisher one). If anyone could give me some pointers, tell me what needs to be fixed or say what's being done right, that'd be great.

Benel Germosen
04-01-2010, 01:46 PM
Awesome question!

Male/ male friendships - I don't know what it is, but I explore men bonding with each other all the time. I've noticed that dudes losing or gaining friends has been a consistent theme in a lot of my work.


Slash fiction doesn't count!

mike black
04-01-2010, 02:20 PM
Drug use, depression, facing futility, and hand guns all appear in my writing quite often.

Thematically, overcoming guilt, self-destruction, and repression.

Fygar
04-01-2010, 02:44 PM
Slash fiction doesn't count!

Damn it, that's 85% of my work ;) People love my stories of Iron Man and Jarvis finally doing the deed...

mike black
04-01-2010, 03:03 PM
Let's talk about tropes.

What have tropes do you like to use in your writing? What recurring things do you do alot?

Partnerships: I enjoy the idea of partnerships and the relationship between two people.

Weirdness: I like weird shit. The weirder, the better. I have a short story that's 7000 words all about two travelers walking the road thorough Sheol.

From what I've seen, the afterlife is a big part of your writing as well.

Benel Germosen
04-01-2010, 04:13 PM
From what I've seen, the afterlife is a big part of your writing as well.

I know, right? I actually had to stop myself from writing about hell this last month and a half.

mike black
04-01-2010, 05:04 PM
I know, right? I actually had to stop myself from writing about hell this last month and a half.

Why? Ride it, man.

Benel Germosen
04-01-2010, 06:02 PM
Why? Ride it, man.

Nah. All that musing about hell came from my depression. Now that I'm not as depressed, I can write about a lot of other things.

Plus, it's boring tackling the same shit over and over again. I know I'll be back to it. I got a lot to say about death and the living, but for now I got some other stuff I wanna touch on.

joshdahl
04-01-2010, 06:24 PM
I write a lot about friendship and loyalty and action vs inaction.

I noticed lately that a lot of my writing features characters who are indecisive admiring characters who are more driven.

Hopefully that will gradually change as this project progresses.

I figure, if these characters represent ME....and this project IS me taking action in my life, then the characters that I sympathize with will become more and more accustomed to TAKING action rather than simply pining away for it.

And, in case I have not mentioned it in this thread I am keeping a running blog about the process of writing a monthly semi-autobiographical superhero comic book.

mike black
04-01-2010, 06:45 PM
I have to admit I'm not getting much out of this thread. Am I really that much of a cock? :lol:

Fygar
04-01-2010, 09:29 PM
I have to admit I'm not getting much out of this thread. Am I really that much of a cock? :lol:

I'm not sure I understand what you mean 'getting much out of it' so I can't say for sure if you're a cock or not :D

Benel Germosen
04-01-2010, 09:50 PM
I have to admit I'm not getting much out of this thread. Am I really that much of a cock? :lol:

If you were, you would be a very good looking cock.

mike black
04-02-2010, 06:32 AM
I'm not sure I understand what you mean 'getting much out of it' so I can't say for sure if you're a cock or not :D

I was mostly drunk last night when I posted that. I believe I was referring to less input from other posters than I was hoping for.

mike black
04-02-2010, 06:33 AM
If you were, you would be a very good looking cock.

Are you hitting on me?

Fygar
04-02-2010, 09:49 AM
I was mostly drunk last night when I posted that. I believe I was referring to less input from other posters than I was hoping for.

I think that's mainly because you've been posting poetry as of late, and I for one don't have a clue what makes poetry good (and I'm sure the same can be said for a lot of us).

I realize I've mainly been bloggy in this thread more than anything, and I need to share a sample of something soon. It just seems like the last few things I wrote are better as a whole, and just a scene or two really won't do it justice.

Benel Germosen
04-02-2010, 10:31 AM
Are you hitting on me?

When am I not?

Michael-Deery
04-02-2010, 11:21 AM
I'm posting on the Bendis Board to avoid writing.

I feel like a real writer :)

mike black
04-02-2010, 02:11 PM
When am I not?

When I'm inside you.

:surrend:

mike black
04-02-2010, 02:15 PM
I think that's mainly because you've been posting poetry as of late, and I for one don't have a clue what makes poetry good (and I'm sure the same can be said for a lot of us).

I realize I've mainly been bloggy in this thread more than anything, and I need to share a sample of something soon. It just seems like the last few things I wrote are better as a whole, and just a scene or two really won't do it justice.

I suppose I just feel like I'm talking at the thread (even the board) sometimes. I think I'm going to take a break for a while.

I should probly share the new script I completed - feedback is always welcome.

Fygar
04-02-2010, 02:22 PM
I suppose I just feel like I'm talking at the thread sometimes.

Yeah, I feel the same way. Let's hug it out :)


I should probly share the new script I completed - feedback is always welcome.

I'd be willing to give it the once over.

There is something I've been meaning to say to you Mike in this very thread. I have no idea how you drink and write. I purposely get the writing I want to get done before I go out for drinks, because I know for sure I'm not writing when I get back. Even when I just have a buzz, I have no desire to write. Sometimes I force it and get extremely tired within mere minutes. You are a machine, sir! :)

Fygar
04-02-2010, 02:23 PM
I suppose I just feel like I'm talking at the thread (even the board) sometimes. I think I'm going to take a break for a while.

You changed this before I quoted you last time. Don't take a break man, breaks are for pussies ;-) Just kidding, do what you gotta do.

mike black
04-02-2010, 02:33 PM
There is something I've been meaning to say to you Mike in this very thread. I have no idea how you drink and write. I purposely get the writing I want to get done before I go out for drinks, because I know for sure I'm not writing when I get back. Even when I just have a buzz, I have no desire to write. Sometimes I force it and get extremely tired within mere minutes. You are a machine, sir! :)

Quite a bit of my writing deals with how emotions affect the body, relationships, and world view - in addition to the need for people to self medicate with alcohol, narcotics, sex, and self-destruction.

It's a good head space to be in, really.

I've always been more introspective and contemplative when drunk or stoned - it greases the wheels for me.

For example -

Whiskey courage and that pregnant moment,
that held breath and crooked smile stolen,
and the crush, calm, cool crush disappoints;
the warm lick of a bit tongue swollen.

Written last night while drunk. Mental plasticity kicks in the wheels turn.

That's not to say I have to be drunk or high to write, but it's often an interesting exercise.

Fygar
04-02-2010, 02:43 PM
Quite a bit of my writing deals with how emotions affect the body, relationships, and world view - in addition to the need for people to self medicate with alcohol, narcotics, sex, and self-destruction.

It's a good head space to be in, really.

I've always been more introspective and contemplative when drunk or stoned - it greases the wheels for me.

For example -

Whiskey courage and that pregnant moment,
that held breath and crooked smile stolen,
and the crush, calm, cool crush disappoints;
the warm lick of a bit tongue swollen.

Written last night while drunk. Mental plasticity kicks in the wheels turn.

That's not to say I have to be drunk or high to write, but it's often an interesting exercise.

And I hope you didn't think I was implying that you do have to be inebriated to write, because that wasn't my intention.

No, I really wish I could be creative when drinking, but it's honestly me at my laziest. I typically throw on a movie or play video games when I get home from the bar.

I honestly think I'm far too militant when it comes to writing. I have my set ways and rarely break the pattern. There are little quirks that I hate about my scripts that have been there from the very beginning and I usually don't even notice them until I edit.

And as I mentioned earlier, I don't know shit about poetry, but I like the four lines above. I think the last line brings it home rather nicely.

mike black
04-02-2010, 02:51 PM
And I hope you didn't think I was implying that you do have to be inebriated to write, because that wasn't my intention.

No, I really wish I could be creative when drinking, but it's honestly me at my laziest. I typically throw on a movie or play video games when I get home from the bar.

I honestly think I'm far too militant when it comes to writing. I have my set ways and rarely break the pattern. There are little quirks that I hate about my scripts that have been there from the very beginning and I usually don't even notice them until I edit.

And as I mentioned earlier, I don't know shit about poetry, but I like the four lines above. I think the last line brings it home rather nicely.

Just for my own information - what would you say those lines are about?

I'm always interested in experimentation, so I like to break my ways and do something new or interesting. It's really worth playing around with to see where it takes you.

I'd recomend that anyone try it, atleast just to see.

mike black
04-02-2010, 09:16 PM
By the by, Fygar, shoot me your e-mail and I'll send the script over.

Kurt Russell Crowe
04-02-2010, 09:22 PM
I have an empty house and nothing to do this week. Think I'm gonna try and write a screenplay or two. Some of those glutton for punishment contests haven't had their deadlines hit until May

Fygar
04-02-2010, 09:28 PM
By the by, Fygar, shoot me your e-mail and I'll send the script over.

PM sent!

As far as the lines go Mike. My interpretation was it talked about flirtation while under the influence. This flirtation lead to something physical but now there's some guilt attached because they weren't being themselves. I'm sure I'm way off, but that's the way I read it :)

Fygar
04-02-2010, 09:35 PM
I have an empty house and nothing to do this week. Think I'm gonna try and write a screenplay or two. Some of those glutton for punishment contests haven't had their deadlines hit until May

Whoa...do you have ideas already or are you starting from scratch? That seems like a ton of work in a week.

Question for those who write comic scripts. Do you draw your layouts? I have to and can't imagine not. I have to visualize the look of my page and jot it down to make sure it flows right. I don't sketch anything in the panels at all, but I definitely need to know what my pages look like. And if you do do this do you send these outlines to your artist? I always wonder if it's too much, and if it'll upset them if I do. I mean I already write it out in the script itself. It usually looks something like this:

PAGE 6
Six panels
Four rows. One panel in the first row. Three panels in the second row. Two panels in the third row.

I often wonder if that's too much. What do you guys do/ think?

Kurt Russell Crowe
04-02-2010, 10:19 PM
Vague high concept ideas, nothing worked out as far as plot or characters. I'm unemployed, mind you. I'm talking an intensive binge here. And I don't sleep but maybe three hours night. So many, many hours to work with.

Fygar
04-02-2010, 10:35 PM
Vague high concept ideas, nothing worked out as far as plot or characters. I'm unemployed, mind you. I'm talking an intensive binge here. And I don't sleep but maybe three hours night. So many, many hours to work with.

Ah now I see. Good luck man, and let us know how it goes as the week progresses.

NeverWanderer
04-02-2010, 10:52 PM
Whoa...do you have ideas already or are you starting from scratch? That seems like a ton of work in a week.

Question for those who write comic scripts. Do you draw your layouts? I have to and can't imagine not. I have to visualize the look of my page and jot it down to make sure it flows right. I don't sketch anything in the panels at all, but I definitely need to know what my pages look like. And if you do do this do you send these outlines to your artist? I always wonder if it's too much, and if it'll upset them if I do. I mean I already write it out in the script itself. It usually looks something like this:

PAGE 6
Six panels
Four rows. One panel in the first row. Three panels in the second row. Two panels in the third row.

I often wonder if that's too much. What do you guys do/ think?

Sometimes I'll sketch out page layouts just to make sure the amount of panels or the angle I'm asking for actually works, and if it's particularly complicated, I'll scan it and send it along with the script. The artist I've been working with has always found it helpful.

With regards to writing out specific page layouts... It's been said that if you're going to describe the layout of one page, you should do it for all pages, or not at all. I, personally, find that to be a waste of writing/reading time going one way, or a waste of ideas going the other.

For the most part, I let my artist design the pages however he wants, because he'll always make it look better than what I envisioned it in my head. I only give him detailed layout instructions when I have a very specific need, or what I hope is a cool idea, for the pacing of a scene. In those instances (unless it's just something simple like "5 horizontal panels listed down the page") I'll sketch it out and send it to the artist to show him what I mean.

Ultimately, I think it really depends on your relationship with the artist. If you're writing without having an artist, it is important to be as specific about what you want as you can, but I would think that dictating the amount of panels in each row on every page can run the risk of handcuffing whoever ends up drawing it for you. Should always keep yourself open to the improvisations of your artist -- they're almost always an improvement.

NeverWanderer
04-02-2010, 10:53 PM
Vague high concept ideas, nothing worked out as far as plot or characters. I'm unemployed, mind you. I'm talking an intensive binge here. And I don't sleep but maybe three hours night. So many, many hours to work with.

You're a madman. :lol: Be sure to keep us updated on your progress!

Benel Germosen
04-02-2010, 10:59 PM
Alright Dildo-enthusiasts. I got a new short story called " Watchmakers ", which is a reworking of Robert Steven Rhines The Seer, which is going to go on my site. I need volunteers to be eye-fucked by it. You know the drill. PM me your e-mail address and I'll send you a copy.

NeverWanderer
04-02-2010, 10:59 PM
Just for my own information - what would you say those lines are about?


You weren't asking me, but for my two cents, they seem to suggest a before and after picture to me. First two lines are the little nervous ticks and emotional high of the moment leading up to....

.......and then we get the aftermath. The disappointment, the tongue bitten absently in frustration. The anticipation of something amazing followed by the bitter sting of disillusionment.

But we never know over what.

Nick Spencer
04-02-2010, 11:14 PM
PAGE 6
Six panels
Four rows. One panel in the first row. Three panels in the second row. Two panels in the third row.

I often wonder if that's too much. What do you guys do/ think?

My advice: too much. Your artist knows the page better than you do and is going to lay it out better than you ever could. That's not to say there's never a place for dictating a grid, but it should be those rare times when you really believe you need some very precise choreography.

Jef UK
04-03-2010, 08:10 AM
Whoa...do you have ideas already or are you starting from scratch? That seems like a ton of work in a week.

Question for those who write comic scripts. Do you draw your layouts? I have to and can't imagine not. I have to visualize the look of my page and jot it down to make sure it flows right. I don't sketch anything in the panels at all, but I definitely need to know what my pages look like. And if you do do this do you send these outlines to your artist? I always wonder if it's too much, and if it'll upset them if I do. I mean I already write it out in the script itself. It usually looks something like this:

PAGE 6
Six panels
Four rows. One panel in the first row. Three panels in the second row. Two panels in the third row.

I often wonder if that's too much. What do you guys do/ think?

I do my own layouts. For Americans UK, that's what I give to Paul with the script (sometimes without the script)--he hadn't done comics before, and it just became a part of our system, speeding our efforts up considerably.

While I draw my own layouts for every other comic I write, other artists rarely to never see them, and I only describe panels in detail like you are doing on rare occasions. Your artist is going to be better at layout than you are (hopefully).

c. page
04-03-2010, 08:28 AM
Whoa...do you have ideas already or are you starting from scratch? That seems like a ton of work in a week.

Question for those who write comic scripts. Do you draw your layouts? I have to and can't imagine not. I have to visualize the look of my page and jot it down to make sure it flows right. I don't sketch anything in the panels at all, but I definitely need to know what my pages look like. And if you do do this do you send these outlines to your artist? I always wonder if it's too much, and if it'll upset them if I do. I mean I already write it out in the script itself. It usually looks something like this:

PAGE 6
Six panels
Four rows. One panel in the first row. Three panels in the second row. Two panels in the third row.

I often wonder if that's too much. What do you guys do/ think?

i'm in a different boat, because i usually draw my own scripts, so it tends to help quite a bit. but really, it depends on the artist. i've known some who appreciated the tighter layout design in the script, and others who prefer it to be more open.

generally, i preface each script by telling the artist (if not me) that they should feel free to change things around, if they want. for the most part, though, i'll just give the number of panels in a script, and let the artist lay it out the way they want, unless there's a specific point i'm trying to hit.

The Doctor
04-03-2010, 08:38 AM
Just noticed this thread

I very much enjoy writing every day, give me a lift

mike black
04-03-2010, 08:43 AM
You weren't asking me, but for my two cents, they seem to suggest a before and after picture to me. First two lines are the little nervous ticks and emotional high of the moment leading up to....

.......and then we get the aftermath. The disappointment, the tongue bitten absently in frustration. The anticipation of something amazing followed by the bitter sting of disillusionment.

But we never know over what.

Fygar was close, you were spot on. ;)

Fygar
04-03-2010, 08:45 AM
Fygar was close, you were spot on. ;)

Damn it ;-)

mike black
04-03-2010, 08:45 AM
Whoa...do you have ideas already or are you starting from scratch? That seems like a ton of work in a week.

Question for those who write comic scripts. Do you draw your layouts? I have to and can't imagine not. I have to visualize the look of my page and jot it down to make sure it flows right. I don't sketch anything in the panels at all, but I definitely need to know what my pages look like. And if you do do this do you send these outlines to your artist? I always wonder if it's too much, and if it'll upset them if I do. I mean I already write it out in the script itself. It usually looks something like this:

PAGE 6
Six panels
Four rows. One panel in the first row. Three panels in the second row. Two panels in the third row.

I often wonder if that's too much. What do you guys do/ think?

Let the artist do their job. ;)

A large part of the artist's job is to interpret that and make it work. You should trust that they can do that. The only time I'll direct panel lay outs is if I have a specific idea in mind for pacing reasons.

mike black
04-03-2010, 08:48 AM
PM sent!

As far as the lines go Mike. My interpretation was it talked about flirtation while under the influence. This flirtation lead to something physical but now there's some guilt attached because they weren't being themselves. I'm sure I'm way off, but that's the way I read it :)

Check your mail, man. ;)

mike black
04-04-2010, 08:04 PM
Purposeful press, soft subtle skill;
A light bite and gentle pull, say;
"Press deeper, ever deeper still";
and I float, fly, am flung away.

I really should be scripting.

mike black
04-04-2010, 08:15 PM
Check your mail, man. ;)

Also, resent it with the correct file type, Fygar.

Fygar
04-04-2010, 09:02 PM
Also, resent it with the correct file type, Fygar.

I just saw that. I should have it read by tomorrow or Tuesday at the latest :rock:

So I was looking at my notes for the remaining seven chapters of this graphic novel I'm writing. I have one that is set in Japan, and it's fairly different than the other pieces. I was wondering if it would be too much if this chapter read like a Manga (last page to first, right to left). I have title cards for each chapter, so the instructions could be placed there. None of the 9 chapters connect, they're all independent stories. What do you guys think? Would that be too jarring, too showy, or kind of neat?

mike black
04-04-2010, 09:12 PM
I just saw that. I should have it read by tomorrow or Tuesday at the latest :rock:

So I was looking at my notes for the remaining seven chapters of this graphic novel I'm writing. I have one that is set in Japan, and it's fairly different than the other pieces. I was wondering if it would be too much if this chapter read like a Manga (last page to first, right to left). I have title cards for each chapter, so the instructions could be placed there. None of the 9 chapters connect, they're all independent stories. What do you guys think? Would that be too jarring, too showy, or kind of neat?

Too jarring if the rest of the work isn't presented that way. Unless you're purposely trying to break what comics are for an artistic reason - I would avoid it.

c. page
04-04-2010, 09:18 PM
PAGE 6
Six panels
Four rows. One panel in the first row. Three panels in the second row. Two panels in the third row.

also just noticed this, as the quote is at the top of the page whenever i open this thread. if you are going to give the artist directions, make sure that the number of panels/rows you are describing matches what you want.

in this case, you have six panels in four rows at the start. but go on to describe six panels in three rows. could make an artist go "what the fuck?"

Fygar
04-04-2010, 09:36 PM
also just noticed this, as the quote is at the top of the page whenever i open this thread. if you are going to give the artist directions, make sure that the number of panels/rows you are describing matches what you want.

in this case, you have six panels in four rows at the start. but go on to describe six panels in three rows. could make an artist go "what the fuck?"

Hahaha, yeah it could :) Nice catch Chris, I'm surprised no one else caught this. Hopefully those mistakes aren't in my real scripts :)

c. page
04-04-2010, 09:39 PM
Hahaha, yeah it could :) Nice catch Chris, I'm surprised no one else caught this. Hopefully those mistakes aren't in my real scripts :)

i would hope in most cases, the artist would contact you for clarification, at least.

NeverWanderer
04-05-2010, 12:51 AM
SCORE! Just found Strunk & White's "The Elements of Style" for free on the web.

http://www.bartleby.com/141/

More essential to a writer's arsenal than "Story." Yeah, I said it.

Benel Germosen
04-05-2010, 02:16 PM
Cross-posting this on my facebook

http://benelgermosen.blogspot.com/2010/04/sleeper-in-dust.html

Short story I couldn't sell. I warn you, it's 7k and there's a pretty substantial non-sequitar during the middle part that's the definition of " Hoopledootal ". That said, I'm completely in love with this story.

joshdahl
04-05-2010, 04:00 PM
cross posted from my blog (http://monolithllc.com/rapidcity/).


I have started using the Celtx’s new “session timer” feature, and I love it.

It get my fingers moving across the keyboard. When I open the script I am working on (issue #8), it automatically starts timing me. Then, at any time, I can look at the stats that are generated in any given session. I have barely started to explore this. What it has, however, made me painfully of is how much more time I spend THINKING about writing than actually WRITING WORDS.

This may, in the short term, impact the plotting and thematic strength of my work. But I expect that I will eventually learn to work with that level of pressure AND put out the kind of work I want to produce

Benel Germosen
04-05-2010, 07:24 PM
cross posted from my blog (http://monolithllc.com/rapidcity/).


I have started using the Celtx’s new “session timer” feature, and I love it.

It get my fingers moving across the keyboard. When I open the script I am working on (issue #8), it automatically starts timing me. Then, at any time, I can look at the stats that are generated in any given session. I have barely started to explore this. What it has, however, made me painfully of is how much more time I spend THINKING about writing than actually WRITING WORDS.

This may, in the short term, impact the plotting and thematic strength of my work. But I expect that I will eventually learn to work with that level of pressure AND put out the kind of work I want to produce


Wasn't it Falkner who spent a week writing one sentence?

mike black
04-05-2010, 07:28 PM
cross posted from my blog (http://monolithllc.com/rapidcity/).


I have started using the Celtx’s new “session timer” feature, and I love it.

It get my fingers moving across the keyboard. When I open the script I am working on (issue #8), it automatically starts timing me. Then, at any time, I can look at the stats that are generated in any given session. I have barely started to explore this. What it has, however, made me painfully of is how much more time I spend THINKING about writing than actually WRITING WORDS.

This may, in the short term, impact the plotting and thematic strength of my work. But I expect that I will eventually learn to work with that level of pressure AND put out the kind of work I want to produce

I would wager I spend somewhere around 70% of my time thinking about writing, 15% of my time working. 14% of my time sleeping, and 1% of my time actually writing.

Take from that what you will.

joshdahl
04-06-2010, 01:51 AM
Question for those who write comic scripts. Do you draw your layouts? I have to and can't imagine not. I have to visualize the look of my page and jot it down to make sure it flows right. I don't sketch anything in the panels at all, but I definitely need to know what my pages look like. And if you do do this do you send these outlines to your artist? I always wonder if it's too much, and if it'll upset them if I do. I mean I already write it out in the script itself. It usually looks something like this:

PAGE 6
Six panels
Four rows. One panel in the first row. Three panels in the second row. Two panels in the third row.

I often wonder if that's too much. What do you guys do/ think?

Most artists (I think) like as much specificity as you can give them. I think that this attitude is common enough that you can assume it is what an artist wants. And, if that is not the case, it is up to him or her to tell you.

I don't draw out pages, but I do imagine shots and panel sizes. I include as much specific detail about angle and composition as I feel are important to the panel, page, and story. If it doesn't matter what a character is wearing, for example, I will not mention it.

Josh

joshdahl
04-06-2010, 01:56 AM
Hahaha, yeah it could :) Nice catch Chris, I'm surprised no one else caught this. Hopefully those mistakes aren't in my real scripts :)

We're writers, not COUNTERS! Take that crap to the Official Counting Thread.


Wasn't it Falkner who spent a week writing one sentence?

Ummmm..no.... it was Faulkner!


I would wager I spend somewhere around 70% of my time thinking about writing, 15% of my time working. 14% of my time sleeping, and 1% of my time actually writing.

Take from that what you will.

I still spend a lot of time thinking as a pre-write.
What I am referring to above is more like just sitting there spinning my wheels.

mike black
04-06-2010, 09:24 PM
The sea of sand, the sun and saturating heat;
The misstep sings, loud a single beat;
The solitary space stretches out a thousand feet;
screams the epiphany that comes to meet
forever.

mike black
04-12-2010, 09:36 PM
Jesus, writing shorts is fucking terrible. I always feel like everything's rushed.

joshdahl
04-15-2010, 09:05 AM
I just posted this on my writing blog (http://www.monolithllc.com/rapidcity).....


My deadline for issue #8 is today.

I am going to miss it, but not by much. This is bad, but not terrible. I started this project as a learning experience, and I am learning a hell of a lot.

The story that I am writing is a about a man trying to be a superhero. The idea is that his progress at being a superhero will mirror my progress at writing a superhero. So far it has been working out pretty well.

The intentional parallels are very nice, and work well whether or not any reader ever notices them. The real fun for me, though, is when things pop out at me that I did not initially intend to include.

For example, the reason that I am late with this issue is because it is moving toward a definite ending. Two characters and a story arc WILL END within these next few pages. I know how it is going to happen, but I am afraid of doing it. I am afraid that I will bungle the execution, and I am afraid of what will happen after.

Each page brings me closer to that uncertainty, so the longer I can stall it, the longer I can exist in a state of pre-determined purpose.

And guess what the characters are going through in the scenes that I am writing. Exactly that. They are comfortable with DOING when it means going after a bad guy or racing to a new fight… but the lingering dread that every step brings them closer to a conclusion eventually becomes paralyzing.

So take a guess what has been happening to me as I wrote those scenes.

Same thing! The allegory holds!

So last night I was at the scene where the final decision is being made. To be or not to be. And I was afraid to start it. Starting is the first step toward finishing. And finishing one thing leads to the uncertainty of the next thing.

The thing that made my characters move is the same thing that made me move. A ticking clock. For them it is a countdown. For me it is Celtx’s session timer. When I see that number going up, adding seconds… and I am not adding words…. I just start typing. If it sucks, I can come back and change it. I just need to fight that clock….. and so do my characters.

Fygar
04-15-2010, 09:09 AM
I just posted this on my writing blog (http://www.monolithllc.com/rapidcity).....

That's really cool dude, thanks for sharing. I have a few meta moments in all of my comics that are totally and 100 percent for me. No one will ever get them, but they're nice nods to what is going on in my life at the time. They make me smile, but don't detract nor add anything to the overall story.

joshdahl
04-15-2010, 04:07 PM
That's really cool dude, thanks for sharing. I have a few meta moments in all of my comics that are totally and 100 percent for me. No one will ever get them, but they're nice nods to what is going on in my life at the time. They make me smile, but don't detract nor add anything to the overall story.

Some of the "meta" stuff I work really hard on. Something happens and I think "how does THIS relate to my story?"
That stuff is great.
The real fun, though, is when I write something that I don't even realize is symbolic of my life.....but there it is.

Fygar
05-02-2010, 12:23 AM
No bumps from anyone in the last few weeks. What are you guys and gals working on? I hope everyone wasn't struck with writer's block.

I finished the third chapter of the graphic novel I've been yapping about a few weeks ago. I decided to take a break from it afterward until I find a new apartment/ job. That didn't work out the way I planned. I found I just slept more and watched awful television shows.

During my break I realized there were several scenes I wasn't happy with in the third chapter. What I thought was going to be a brief edit has turned into a vast overhaul. I'm digging the new structure, and I also approached the panel descriptions in a new loose style that I enjoy much more. I now want to go back and do a new edit for every graphic novel I've ever written...yikes. It never ends.

c. page
05-02-2010, 12:29 AM
No bumps from anyone in the last few weeks. What are you guys and gals working on? I hope everyone wasn't struck with writer's block.

I finished the third chapter of the graphic novel I've been yapping about a few weeks ago. I decided to take a break from it afterward until I find a new apartment/ job. That didn't work out the way I planned. I found I just slept more and watched awful television shows.

During my break I realized there were several scenes I wasn't happy with in the third chapter. What I thought was going to be a brief edit has turned into a vast overhaul. I'm digging the new structure, and I also approached the panel descriptions in a new loose style that I enjoy much more. I now want to go back and do a new edit for every graphic novel I've ever written...yikes. It never ends.

pretty much all of my time and energy is involved in getting the art done on this book right now. but i have a few things i kick around in my head while at work for when i'm done, plus have a few scripts to re-work.

Fygar
05-02-2010, 12:59 AM
pretty much all of my time and energy is involved in getting the art done on this book right now. but i have a few things i kick around in my head while at work for when i'm done, plus have a few scripts to re-work.

Is the one you're working on now something you wrote as well, Chris? What genre you playing with at the moment?

c. page
05-02-2010, 01:47 AM
Is the one you're working on now something you wrote as well, Chris? What genre you playing with at the moment?

the art i'm doing is for my current project that i co-wrote with adam witt. superhero satire. i also have a noir comic that i've been working on forever that needs some heavy re-working, and witt and i are planning on re-doing FEUCH! as an OGN at some point as well.

and i have a novel/novella that needs working at some point, but that's on the extreme back burner for the moment.

CS Ambrose
05-02-2010, 05:52 AM
I have real problem with settings; like when one character meets another where do the meet and why do they meet there. I think I worry too much about this stuff which is why I can never get off the ground.

Does anyone else have this problem? Agonising over every detail in every scene?

Andreas
05-02-2010, 06:13 AM
I have real problem with settings; like when one character meets another where do the meet and why do they meet there. I think I worry too much about this stuff which is why I can never get off the ground.

Does anyone else have this problem? Agonising over every detail in every scene?

You're asking the right questions. How significant is setting to the development of the characters' personalities and/or to the plot conflicts? Does your story require a certain general setting, e.g. a part of the city where different socioeconomic classes live. And how does the specific setting influence the meeting of two characters, e.g. a crowded café vs. a dark back alley. Choosing where a scene takes place can add thematic dimension to a scene or make it more suspenseful. If the scene you've written feels flat, you might try a new setting that makes the scene more exciting or intense. If setting is meant to be a motivating factor or a reflection of the conflicts within the characters, then more description is possibly necessary. If setting is not significant to the story, avoid excessive description.

Andreas

CS Ambrose
05-02-2010, 06:18 AM
Here (http://ambroseshadowseed.blogspot.com/) is a rough draft of the story I work on and a very basic script for the first issue. I've had two artists working with me previously - both of whom had to drop out due to other commitments.

Any feedback would be welcome.

Andreas
05-02-2010, 06:58 AM
Some thoughts on the draft...

scene one:
- is John a recurring character? perhaps add a scene immediately before your opening that tells us something about John, perhaps he is breaking in and trying to steal something. is he worried about his family? why did he put himself into a dangerous situation? hint at what it is he or his organisation gains from putting his life in danger.

scene two:
- too vague, why is this meeting important? we don't learn anything about the characters. perhaps tell us why "he could be very helpful to us." if the man in black wears dark glasses, how do you plan to show him as handsome? you may need to show his eyes, give him some other feature that makes him different from the other characters.

scene three to scene six:
- we know too little about the men in the room. the talk should be more focused. two men, they have to take a third man from place A to place B. make it more clear that Hanna has doubts that they are not who they pretend to be. the talk about The Untouchables doesn't add anything.

scene seven:
- enhance the atmosphere of mistrust. why doesn't the muscular man trust that man? have they been betrayed by someone before? you still haven't given us any information about the battling groups and the reader is growing impatient.

Andreas

Benel Germosen
05-02-2010, 08:42 AM
Writing in first person is easy: True or false?

joshdahl
05-02-2010, 02:01 PM
I've been really stuck with the next issue. First, I have been very busy, every time I sit down to write, there is something else I need to do.

Also, I am not sure where to conflict should be in this latest issue, or how to express it.

CS Ambrose
05-02-2010, 02:29 PM
Some thoughts on the draft...

scene one:
- is John a recurring character? perhaps add a scene immediately before your opening that tells us something about John, perhaps he is breaking in and trying to steal something. is he worried about his family? why did he put himself into a dangerous situation? hint at what it is he or his organisation gains from putting his life in danger.

scene two:
- too vague, why is this meeting important? we don't learn anything about the characters. perhaps tell us why "he could be very helpful to us." if the man in black wears dark glasses, how do you plan to show him as handsome? you may need to show his eyes, give him some other feature that makes him different from the other characters.

scene three to scene six:
- we know too little about the men in the room. the talk should be more focused. two men, they have to take a third man from place A to place B. make it more clear that Hanna has doubts that they are not who they pretend to be. the talk about The Untouchables doesn't add anything.

scene seven:
- enhance the atmosphere of mistrust. why doesn't the muscular man trust that man? have they been betrayed by someone before? you still haven't given us any information about the battling groups and the reader is growing impatient.

Andreas

Well the first scene is supposed to be purposely vague. You want to find out who this man is and what he is running from. Remember this is just the first part.

The dark glasses are nessisary to the character and I do not believe showing the character as handsome would be difficult because that character wears glasses.

The intention of the seventh scene is to establish that Solomon is an untrustworthy and unsavoury character. In following drafts I use Solomon's name so as not to be so vague.

Thanks for the help

NeverWanderer
05-02-2010, 02:34 PM
No bumps from anyone in the last few weeks. What are you guys and gals working on? I hope everyone wasn't struck with writer's block.

I finished the third chapter of the graphic novel I've been yapping about a few weeks ago. I decided to take a break from it afterward until I find a new apartment/ job. That didn't work out the way I planned. I found I just slept more and watched awful television shows.

During my break I realized there were several scenes I wasn't happy with in the third chapter. What I thought was going to be a brief edit has turned into a vast overhaul. I'm digging the new structure, and I also approached the panel descriptions in a new loose style that I enjoy much more. I now want to go back and do a new edit for every graphic novel I've ever written...yikes. It never ends.

I haven't worked on the mini in a few weeks. I was going strong for a week or two, and then other things started distracting me. Preparations for the upcoming move, the new blog (which I'm late on updating), general fussy free-floaty-ness. I won't call it writer's block, but there's definitely a wall there that I've just gotta buckle down and climb over.


Writing in first person is easy: True or false?

True. For me, at least. I've always found it easier to write from a specific character's perspective than from the omniscient third person. More fun little details to play with, like, "at which point in this person's life did they start narrating their past adventures? Could you switch tenses halfway through a story, kill off the main character, and then finish it from the perspective of someone entirely new?" Shit like that fascinates me.

Jef UK
05-02-2010, 05:22 PM
I'm turning in 87 pages of full script to Oni in the morning. Over halfway finished! Transcribing now from handwritten pages; at page 60 in that respect.

146-150 total pages due by July. I think I've got it.

Got off scripts and breakdowns for pages 7 & 8 of AM/UK #4 to Paul Ciaravino last week. Will scan and send the next two set of breakdowns tomorrow too, probably. I finished thumbnails for this months ago, and kind of just coast along sending Paul stuff as he needs it.

We (Americans UK) have written and recorded 3 songs in the last 6 weeks for pitching to some films we were asked to pitch to, so it's lots of spinning of plates right now.

Akira
05-02-2010, 05:29 PM
Been busier than usual recently. Got my first script sent out to my artist a couple weeks ago. I'd appreciate any insights. Especially on the last 6 pages or so. I tried something a little showy, but I don't know if it works or not.
*link removed* PM if you want to read it.


Now I'm working on my outline for the next leg of the project. Our idea is to produce issue# 1 and get that out to retailers, potential customers, editors, etc. And then follow it up with a completed graphic novel that contains the first issue and the rest of the entire first arc. Reason being, I feel like a reasonably priced trade/graphic novel is more attractive to a potential consumer. Getting the whole story, or at least a big chunk of it, as opposed to piecing it out in smallerbits

dmh3000
05-02-2010, 06:30 PM
Had a pretty good week last week with my writing. I managed to finish the script for issue three of Gemini Storm and have four and five pretty much plotted out. Also, I got about two months worth of scripts done for Living With Insanity.

Currently plotting a mini-series.

mike black
05-02-2010, 07:00 PM
Putting a gun to my head.

Benel Germosen
05-02-2010, 07:40 PM
Putting a gun to my head.

That's what it feels like sometimes.

Fygar
05-02-2010, 09:22 PM
Been busier than usual recently. Got my first script sent out to my artist a couple weeks ago. I'd appreciate any insights. Especially on the last 6 pages or so. I tried something a little showy, but I don't know if it works or not.
http://www.mediafire.com/?wyqgkzint44


Now I'm working on my outline for the next leg of the project. Our idea is to produce issue# 1 and get that out to retailers, potential customers, editors, etc. And then follow it up with a completed graphic novel that contains the first issue and the rest of the entire first arc. Reason being, I feel like a reasonably priced trade/graphic novel is more attractive to a potential consumer. Getting the whole story, or at least a big chunk of it, as opposed to piecing it out in smallerbits

Good for you Akira, I will read this script some time this week and PM you with some thoughts.

I agree completely on the trade idea. I can't justify money on single issues anymore. I'm way more likely to shell out cash on a solid trade since (as you said) it's a chunk of the story.

Akira
05-03-2010, 08:42 AM
Good for you Akira, I will read this script some time this week and PM you with some thoughts.

I agree completely on the trade idea. I can't justify money on single issues anymore. I'm way more likely to shell out cash on a solid trade since (as you said) it's a chunk of the story.

Thanks, I'll be interested in your thoughts. And I think that trades are the way to go for unestablished creators, just because it's less of a time commitment for the reader. They get more than 30 pages to determine if they're interested in the book, and don't have to wait for a month (or likely several ) for the next installment.

mike black
05-03-2010, 10:10 AM
That's what it feels like sometimes.

If it didn't everyone would do it.

mike black
05-03-2010, 10:29 AM
Setting a schedule for myself. "Calusa" finished by the end of May. "Damn Dixie" finished two weeks after that. The Harleaux Clan story within 3 weeks of that.

Akira
05-03-2010, 03:06 PM
Set a schedule for having the outline for the rest of the graphic novel written by this weekend and the script finished by the end of the year. I'm giving myself such a long window so that I can't use the wedding planning and honeymoon as an excuse. I have that time built in.

Akira
05-10-2010, 04:43 AM
Finished my outline on deadline (!!!) and it seems pretty tight. Now to get started converting it into script form.
This will be my first time working from such a tight outline. I usually only have a paragraph or two per issue, this one is several pages for what's essentially 4-5 issues worth of story. So hopefully this will let me get the actual scripting done faster since I did more of the heavy lifting on the front end.
I really liked the freedom I felt in being able to write an outline and know that I'm not hindered by the limitations of the single issue format. I understand there's a place for that in the medium too, but man, not having to double check my page counts and worry about not being able to let certain scenes breathe was awesome. I think I'm gonna have a lot of fun writing this one!

Jef UK
05-10-2010, 05:55 AM
I worked on the Odd Schnozz script all weekend. Had a lot of "ah-hah" moments, and fixed some problems that had emerged with some well-placed lines of dialogue. I'm also going through the script and getting rid of panels that captured unneccesary beats like slowly zooming in on some moment. Having so many drawn pages from an artist really helps in this regard, seeing what he can do, and what in my script is unneccesary.

The transcription process takes forever!

I also picked up an article for Graphic NYC, a New York graphic novel blog. I don't really have the time, but I feel like it would be stupid of me to say no when Dean Haspiel asks me to work on something for him.

joshdahl
05-10-2010, 06:29 AM
Akira,

You are going to love working from a heavier outline. You will find that with less ambiguity about what is going to happen, you have some more freedom to play.

I hear what you are saying about worrying about page counts and all that. I am dealing with that right now. I love it though. I love forcing myself to learn how to control my pacing like that.

In my own project, I just found a cool way to cut a corner and make a difficulkt scene much easier to write... but then that seemed like cheating... so I put it back in in a more interesting way.

I stumbled upon a great narrative device which I think will tie together an otherwise rambling issue.

Josh

Benel Germosen
05-10-2010, 09:36 PM
I got paid today, so it's official.

I've successfully sold a short story to a horror e-zine.

Kedd
05-10-2010, 09:43 PM
I got paid today, so it's official.

I've successfully sold a short story to a horror e-zine.

Congratulations!!!!!!!!!!!

joshdahl
05-11-2010, 01:43 AM
I got paid today, so it's official.

I've successfully sold a short story to a horror e-zine.

Fantastic!

Nice work. Be sure to put up a link when it is released.

Josh

Akira
05-11-2010, 08:51 AM
I got paid today, so it's official.

I've successfully sold a short story to a horror e-zine.

Nice!

Akira,

You are going to love working from a heavier outline. You will find that with less ambiguity about what is going to happen, you have some more freedom to play.

I hear what you are saying about worrying about page counts and all that. I am dealing with that right now. I love it though. I love forcing myself to learn how to control my pacing like that.

In my own project, I just found a cool way to cut a corner and make a difficulkt scene much easier to write... but then that seemed like cheating... so I put it back in in a more interesting way.

I stumbled upon a great narrative device which I think will tie together an otherwise rambling issue.

Josh

See, I know I'm a writing geek, because finding new ways to play with and in the process makes me smile :)

Benel Germosen
05-11-2010, 08:55 AM
What should you be doing right now?


The answer is " writing ".

NeverWanderer
05-11-2010, 09:00 AM
I got paid today, so it's official.

I've successfully sold a short story to a horror e-zine.

YAAYYYY!!! That's fantastic, dude! Congratulations! :D

Benel Germosen
05-23-2010, 09:19 PM
So. Finally finished Married and Buried. I need another set of eyes (again) to see if it's up to publishing snuff before I sent it out.

Benel Germosen
05-24-2010, 09:25 AM
Bump

Jef UK
05-24-2010, 10:15 AM
I also picked up an article for Graphic NYC, a New York graphic novel blog.

This feels like homework, and I wish I weren't doing it.

Benel Germosen
05-25-2010, 07:51 AM
This feels like homework, and I wish I weren't doing it.

That's what she said.




....wait.

NeverWanderer
05-25-2010, 10:58 AM
So. Finally finished Married and Buried. I need another set of eyes (again) to see if it's up to publishing snuff before I sent it out.

Hey! If I'm not too late for this, shoot it over. :) You know my email.

Fygar
05-25-2010, 11:03 AM
My apologies to Akira. I've been super busy and haven't had a chance to read your script yet. The moment I have some free time, I'll get right on it.

I haven't been writing much at all. I plotted the next chapter of my graphic novel while on a plane to Seattle. I also kept a travel journal while there, and that's taking way longer to finish than I anticipated.

NeverWanderer
05-25-2010, 11:11 AM
I was in a rut for a while, but writing a three-page short recently snapped me out of it. The script is to my art-pal Matt to draw and color, then it's back to me for letters and on to the submissions thread for Mark Millar's CLiNT Magazine. We'll see how that goes.

Other than that, I'm trying to keep a somewhat steady schedule on my blog (http://fartherroom.blogspot.com/). Trying to get used to writing even when I don't feel like writing. So far I've got about a 90% success rate.

jason hissong
05-25-2010, 11:20 AM
I just published a very long, very personal piece over on my blog.

If you have time to read 8,000 words, click away. (http://jhiss.wordpress.com/2010/05/25/get-what-you-need/)

Jef UK
05-25-2010, 11:25 AM
Trying to get used to writing even when I don't feel like writing.

Why? I don't get this mentality.

NeverWanderer
05-25-2010, 11:35 AM
Why? I don't get this mentality.

Why do I sometimes not feel like writing? Or why do I try to push past it?

To the former, I guess it's a writer's block thing. Except it's not so much that the ideas aren't coming, but that I'm struggling to find the right way to express them. I get hung up on the wording, then I get easily distracted. I focus on more immediate forms of expression (message boards, twitter) that don't need as much thought or effort put into them.

To the latter, I figure there are times when a professional writer needs to pump the words out, even if they're not feeling them. I'd rather get used to that now than suddenly find myself blocked on a professional gig.

I have a feeling it's going to be like kicking an addiction for me. It won't suddenly be easy to write without inspiration. Every day will be a challenge.

Jef UK
05-25-2010, 11:48 AM
Except it's not so much that the ideas aren't coming, but that I'm struggling to find the right way to express them. I get hung up on the wording, then I get easily distracted. I focus on more immediate forms of expression.

Then I think you should turn those ideas into immediate forms of expression and worry about the right wording when editing. Do you write directly into a word processor? I think that writing in journals by hand allows "bad writing" to happen--which is a good thing. It's less formal, you can unapolgetically write whatever comes to mind, jump around, scratch it out, draw, what have you, but just let things flow. It also gets you away from the computer where Twitters and Jinxworlds live. You end up doing a lot of the work unhibited that you need to get out in order to get to the refined stuff. As they say: writing is re-writing.

I had similar problems after leaving grad school where I only had time to write on the computer, problems that were solved by going back to writing in journals first, as I had before attending grad school.

NeverWanderer
05-25-2010, 01:01 PM
Then I think you should turn those ideas into immediate forms of expression and worry about the right wording when editing. Do you write directly into a word processor? I think that writing in journals by hand allows "bad writing" to happen--which is a good thing. It's less formal, you can unapolgetically write whatever comes to mind, jump around, scratch it out, draw, what have you, but just let things flow. It also gets you away from the computer where Twitters and Jinxworlds live. You end up doing a lot of the work unhibited that you need to get out in order to get to the refined stuff. As they say: writing is re-writing.

I had similar problems after leaving grad school where I only had time to write on the computer, problems that were solved by going back to writing in journals first, as I had before attending grad school.

That's interesting. I never really considered working stuff out in handwritten form. I'm usually faster on a keyboard, and get less hand-cramps that way. :p

I have been sort of doing what you're suggesting with my word processor, though. I'll create a blank page and just rattle off every idea that comes to mind, incomplete or not, and then just start clicking and dragging, rearranging, fleshing things out. It took me a while to be able to do just that -- I was never good at sketch books... I want everything to right the first time around. But you're right, the temptation of the internet is always there. I'll start using one of my marble notebooks as you suggest and see how it goes.

Thanks for the advice! :)

Jef UK
05-25-2010, 01:18 PM
I want everything to right the first time around. But you're right, the temptation of the internet is always there. I'll start using one of my marble notebooks as you suggest and see how it goes.

Thanks for the advice! :)

Cool. But I think you should move away from the idea of wanting everything right the first time, and you'll probably end up being more productive for it, or at least enjoy the process more. And a part of that (for me, anyway) was moving away from working so much with a word processor, because that felt like a final act to me, i.e., by the time I'm typing something, IT SHOULD be at the "getting it right" stage, and so it was frustrating to draft in word processors. Writing in journals cleared that up for me, even if it's just psychological.

Hope it works for you!

NeverWanderer
05-25-2010, 01:29 PM
Cool. But I think you should move away from the idea of wanting everything right the first time, and you'll probably end up being more productive for it, or at least enjoy the process more.

No, you're absolutely right. That's what I've been kind of overcoming by forcing myself to write more. It's a psychological thing with me that's been a constant obstacle in my life. I think it's why I failed as an artist -- I couldn't handle making all the necessary mistakes on the way to building up my craft. I'd start a fresh page, screw up, get frustrated, turn to the next page. I've got a looooot of unfinished sketch books.


And a part of that (for me, anyway) was moving away from working so much with a word processor, because that felt like a final act to me, i.e., by the time I'm typing something, IT SHOULD be at the "getting it right" stage, and so it was frustrating to draft in word processors. Writing in journals cleared that up for me, even if it's just psychological.

See, again, that's interesting, because I almost feel like I'm the opposite. Writing something on paper feels much more permanent to me because something created by hand is one of a kind. Word processors can constantly change without losing your original (just save-as!). When you copy it, it's always the same. It's like legos to me.

(which, I realize is a weird sort of OCD way of looking at it)

Still, I'm gonna give the handwriting a try. Whatever helps me not get in my own way. :)

Jef UK
05-25-2010, 01:39 PM
See, again, that's interesting, because I almost feel like I'm the opposite. Writing something on paper feels much more permanent to me because something created by hand is one of a kind.

I guess for me a part of it is that it looks like it's going to look when you turn it in to whomever. Also, I just don't like being on the computer after working on the computer all day for my job.

NeverWanderer
05-25-2010, 01:54 PM
Also, I just don't like being on the computer after working on the computer all day for my job.

This I definitely sympathize with. :x

Benel Germosen
05-26-2010, 06:35 AM
Hey! If I'm not too late for this, shoot it over. :) You know my email.

Right away.

Anyone else wants some of this hot short story action? C'mon you dingleberry wranglers. You can't resist.

Jef UK
05-31-2010, 04:08 PM
I also picked up an article for Graphic NYC, a New York graphic novel blog.

Here's my article. It's ok I guess.

http://www.nycgraphicnovelists.com/2010/05/cousin-corinnes-reminder-graphically.html

R0cketFr0g
05-31-2010, 04:20 PM
Here's my article. It's ok I guess.

http://www.nycgraphicnovelists.com/2010/05/cousin-corinnes-reminder-graphically.html

I thought it was good.

Jef UK
05-31-2010, 04:26 PM
I thought it was good.

Thanks, RF!

NeverWanderer
05-31-2010, 06:47 PM
This is the story that I'm submitting to CLiNT. It's not colored yet, but as I have nothing else to do but wait for the colored pages to come in, I figured I'd get a head start on laying it out so I can make edits to the narration where needed. I know it'll likely change when the colors come in, but I wanted to get an idea of how it'll look -- and it was fun. :)

http://www.comicspace.com/neverwanderer/comics.php?action=gallery&comic_id=28198

Jef UK
05-31-2010, 09:15 PM
This is the story that I'm submitting to CLiNT. It's not colored yet, but as I have nothing else to do but wait for the colored pages to come in, I figured I'd get a head start on laying it out so I can make edits to the narration where needed. I know it'll likely change when the colors come in, but I wanted to get an idea of how it'll look -- and it was fun. :)

http://www.comicspace.com/neverwanderer/comics.php?action=gallery&comic_id=28198

I really liked that. It has a really nice turn. Great short!

You have a typo on page 1, panel 2: "parade of bodies to slowed to a trickle"

Also, I'm not sure why you're cramming so many caption boxes in those thin panels (2,3, and 4) on page 1 when you have so much room in panel 1 and again in panels 6 and 7.

NeverWanderer
05-31-2010, 10:03 PM
I really liked that. It has a really nice turn. Great short!

You have a typo on page 1, panel 2: "parade of bodies to slowed to a trickle"

Also, I'm not sure why you're cramming so many caption boxes in those thin panels (2,3, and 4) on page 1 when you have so much room in panel 1 and again in panels 6 and 7.

Thanks, man! :)

And THANK you for spotting that typo. That got through multiple proofs by me and my wife.

My reason for pacing out the first page that way is that I wanted there to be a break in the narration before we got to the last line. There's actually a couple things on the first page that will be different in the finished product. In panel 6, there's going to be a flash of light coming from the building in the distance, like the sniper is signaling the guy on the ground with sunlight reflected off a mirror or something. And then, in panel 7, Matt's changing the expression on the soldier's face to look more hardened and impenetrable.

The idea being that we think the sniper's doing the narration, but then we see him signal to the guy on the ground, and the guy on the ground looks sort of sinister (less victimy at least), and the last caption makes us think that maybe the narrator is really this soldier. It's sort of a misdirect, and I figured that by keeping the narration out of the bottom panels, it would give enough of a beat for the reader to follow the clues.

At least, that's what I'm hoping for.

Are the captions in the first few panels really distracting?

Jef UK
06-01-2010, 06:22 AM
Are the captions in the first few panels really distracting?

I thought it was distracting, and its the only thing that looks amateurish to me. I'm not sure you'll get the effect you're looking for with a signal flare or whatever, but perhaps other readers of this thread will chime in? It's definitely something you need to consider, whether you change it or not.

I really like your artist. Reminds me of Pasqual Ferry.

Benel Germosen
06-01-2010, 06:51 AM
Who has two thumbs and lost the flashdrive with all his short stories on it?

This guy right here.

NeverWanderer
06-01-2010, 09:10 AM
I thought it was distracting, and its the only thing that looks amateurish to me. I'm not sure you'll get the effect you're looking for with a signal flare or whatever, but perhaps other readers of this thread will chime in? It's definitely something you need to consider, whether you change it or not.

I really like your artist. Reminds me of Pasqual Ferry.

Thanks, man. I will definitely take another look at it.

And, Matt's great, isn't he? He's drawn all my comics so far, and he just keeps getting better. I feel really lucky to have found him. He's got more stuff up on his comicspace page: http://www.comicspace.com/smokestack//


Who has two thumbs and lost the flashdrive with all his short stories on it?

This guy right here.

Thaaaaat sucks! Did you check under the bed? Somehow lost shit always ends up under my bed.

Benel Germosen
06-02-2010, 07:45 AM
My story is out on e-book form here (http://www.niteblade.com/june-2010/).

Buy it and tell 'em how much you like it.

Benel Germosen
06-03-2010, 12:14 PM
Bump.

NeverWanderer
06-03-2010, 12:59 PM
Nice!

I don't have an e-reader, though. :(

But it looks like they have at least part of it posted on the site! :D

Jef UK
06-03-2010, 01:44 PM
Nice work, Benel!

Akira
06-03-2010, 05:55 PM
My apologies to Akira. I've been super busy and haven't had a chance to read your script yet. The moment I have some free time, I'll get right on it.

I haven't been writing much at all. I plotted the next chapter of my graphic novel while on a plane to Seattle. I also kept a travel journal while there, and that's taking way longer to finish than I anticipated.

no worries :)

Kyle Higgins
06-04-2010, 11:10 AM
Hey guys-- if you get the chance, I have a book coming out next week. Well actually, it's a reprint of a book I did in December-- http://marvel.com/catalog/?id=14399 At the very least, you'll love Mitch Breitweiser's art on the Knaufs' story