PDA

View Full Version : Online college?



Dave S.
10-28-2009, 11:08 AM
I'm ready to give up on college. I'm 27. It's my second stab at it, and it's just not working for me. It's completely my own fault, my own failings, not trying to say otherwise.

Anyone done the online college thing? University of Phoenix Online or something similar? I'm considering New York State's Empire State College, which is aimed at working adults.

batmanbooyah
10-28-2009, 11:09 AM
were you the one who had sex with their TA and she got all psycho?

Dave S.
10-28-2009, 11:12 AM
were you the one who had sex with their TA and she got all psycho?

Kind of. We never actually had sex. Unless you count oral. And she turned out to be crazy bipolar. On a ton of meds for it.

RegularJoe
10-28-2009, 11:12 AM
i work for an online school. let me say this:

it's the perfect learning method for some people.

it is a horrible idea for others.

you have to have good time management skills. you have to have the ability to learn without the normal class room environment. you have to have a strong internet connection and the time to devote to it. because you don't have to be there for specific times, people tend to forget to schedule 'study' time. that's what gets a lot of people.

Ben
10-28-2009, 11:13 AM
Hoping to have cybersex with one of your online TAs?

Ryudo
10-28-2009, 11:13 AM
Do NOT do University of Phoenix. When you go to get hired, people will laugh at your degree.

Try a vocational school or a certification program. Do a little research. Find something in your area that seems cool and something you think you may enjoy. Go visit the place. That's how I got into my IT program, and I dig the crap out of it.

TIP
10-28-2009, 11:17 AM
Hoping to have cybersex with one of your online TAs?

:lol:

DAVE
10-28-2009, 11:18 AM
Dave, what are you looking to study? What career are you interested in?

Dave S.
10-28-2009, 11:18 AM
My biggest problem right now is balancing school and work.

I work full-time. And professors think that school should be your only job, and assign accordingly.

And I have to work odd hours to work around my class schedule, which gives me less sleep, less 'me time', and more stress. That's why I think online will be better. I can work a normal day, do homework/study when I need to, and not have to worry about giving up free time as much. I'm working 5 days, and in class the other two. So no real day off. So when i get a few hours off I tend to waste it.

TIP
10-28-2009, 11:19 AM
Are we sure it's not this (http://www.606studios.com/bendisboard/showthread.php?t=184392)that's getting in the way of the Ed-u-muh-cay-tion?

Dave S.
10-28-2009, 11:20 AM
Dave, what are you looking to study? What career are you interested in?

At this point, I'll probably stick with the YMCA. I'm working full-time in aquatics. But in order to advance any further, I need a BS. They don't care in what or from where. Experience counts for a lot more in this field.

afroloq
10-28-2009, 11:20 AM
My biggest problem right now is balancing school and work.

I work full-time. And professors think that school should be your only job, and assign accordingly.

And I have to work odd hours to work around my class schedule, which gives me less sleep, less 'me time', and more stress. That's why I think online will be better. I can work a normal day, do homework/study when I need to, and not have to worry about giving up free time as much. I'm working 5 days, and in class the other two. So no real day off. So when i get a few hours off I tend to waste it.

Dave what about signing up for online courses though the school you are already enrolled in?

And believe me, some online courses can be just as stressful...my s/o just completed her master's from SCAD and took all of her classes online and there was MANY times where she had to make huge chunks of time to devote towards class.

So be forewarned, just because it's online doens't mean it will be any less intensive.

DAVE
10-28-2009, 11:21 AM
At this point, I'll probably stick with the YMCA. I'm working full-time in aquatics. But in order to advance any further, I need a BS. They don't care in what or from where. Experience counts for a lot more in this field.

Well, good luck. I'm sure you'll find the right fit.

Dave S.
10-28-2009, 11:30 AM
Dave what about signing up for online courses though the school you are already enrolled in?

And believe me, some online courses can be just as stressful...my s/o just completed her master's from SCAD and took all of her classes online and there was MANY times where she had to make huge chunks of time to devote towards class.

So be forewarned, just because it's online doens't mean it will be any less intensive.

Empire State College is kind of doing that. I'm in a SUNY school, and ESC is also through the SUNY system. It also has branches all over the state, so if I decide to move (I have been considering it) I'm not tied down.

I honestly don't think anything will be as intensive as the upper level Physics courses I've been trying to trudge through. If I'm going to complete school, I need to change my major. And that will mean at least 30-40 credits no matter if I stay where I am or transfer to ESC.

bartleby
10-28-2009, 11:39 AM
Give me your email address and a couple of thousand dollars, and I'll send you a fake diploma.

Jacques Toochay
10-28-2009, 11:49 AM
Wait a minute. A while back you said that you were a physicist. You don't even have an undergraduate degree?
:mistrust:

Oh well. Best laid plans and all of that.

Is there no way you could quit work and just live off student loans so that you could finish your degree?
Or is the job (maybe a career?) more important than the degree?

Dave S.
10-28-2009, 11:52 AM
Wait a minute. A while back you said that you were a physicist. You don't even have an undergraduate degree?
:mistrust:

Oh well. Best laid plans and all of that.

Is there no way you could quit work and just live off student loans so that you could finish your degree?
Or is the job (maybe a career?) more important than the degree?

A physicist is a scientist who studies or practices physics. I practice physics every day.

DrMachine
10-28-2009, 11:55 AM
I took a course here in Boston/Cambridge that was almost completely online. Only exams were in person, it was alright but I think I missed the relationships formed in the other brick and mortar classes. I'd reccommend starting somewhere relatively cheap to see if it's for you...or better yet do one of the free courses through itunes U, that way you have a feel for how you'll like it.

SteveFlack
10-28-2009, 12:09 PM
Empire State College is kind of doing that. I'm in a SUNY school, and ESC is also through the SUNY system. It also has branches all over the state, so if I decide to move (I have been considering it) I'm not tied down.

I honestly don't think anything will be as intensive as the upper level Physics courses I've been trying to trudge through. If I'm going to complete school, I need to change my major. And that will mean at least 30-40 credits no matter if I stay where I am or transfer to ESC.

Dave, I'm sorry to break it to you, despite what Spider-Man tells you, Empire State University is not a real college.

It's good thing I'm here to fill you in, because this could have ended as badly as the time I tried transferring to Bayside High.

Ben
10-28-2009, 12:19 PM
Dave, I'm sorry to break it to you, despite what Spider-Man tells you, Empire State University is not a real college.
Not since Johnny Storm went nova and burned the place down.

afroloq
10-29-2009, 05:03 AM
Dave, I'm sorry to break it to you, despite what Spider-Man tells you, Empire State University is not a real college.

It's good thing I'm here to fill you in, because this could have ended as badly as the time I tried transferring to Bayside High.

Psssst! He said Empire State COLLEGE...not UNIVERSITY...click here and see what I mean. (http://www.esc.edu/esconline/online2.nsf/ESChome.html)

HOOKS
10-29-2009, 06:40 AM
Give me your email address and a couple of thousand dollars, and I'll send you a fake diploma.

Life experience degree! You're not very good at sales, Bart.

Treacle
10-29-2009, 06:51 AM
A physicist is a scientist who studies or practices physics. I practice physics every day.

You're not a scientist.

Jacques Toochay
10-29-2009, 06:59 AM
You're not a scientist.

Thank goodness somebody else pointed this out.

There's a certain baseline of achievement for professional careers before somebody can actually take the title.

Hell, I "practice physics" all day every day as well. Just walking around, I'm constantly doing gravity experiments, friction experiments, momentum experiments, etc.
Does that make me a physicist too?


Unfortunately, you've almost certainly opened the door for Ben with your brave post, Treacle.
;)

chess
10-29-2009, 07:14 AM
At this point, I'll probably stick with the YMCA. I'm working full-time in aquatics. But in order to advance any further, I need a BS. They don't care in what or from where. Experience counts for a lot more in this field.

A couple things to consider....

The University of Indiana (yes, that Indiana) offers distance education degree in "General Studies". It is offered as a "distance program" AND offered at Community Colleges. My local community college in Illinois offers this degree.

Other Universities ("real schools") offer similar programs.

Dave S.
11-02-2009, 07:56 AM
I've done some research, and Empire State College, being part of the SUNY system, seems to be highly respected. For the most part, the degrees are seen as just as valid as from any SUNY school.

SteveZegers
11-02-2009, 07:59 AM
I took some classes that way, mainly required stuff that I just wanted to get out of the way.

It worked well for me, but don't expect to learn very much.

half guard
11-02-2009, 08:26 AM
I took some classes that way, mainly required stuff that I just wanted to get out of the way.

It worked well for me, but don't expect to learn very much.

Same here, except that I did learn a good bit in the odd class or two where the subject was something I was completely clueless about beforehand (knocking out random electives, etc).

Expect to do a lot of writing. You can't take an exam like you do in a brick and mortar scenario. So, almost all of your work is in 500 - 2500 word papers. The idea being that if you can explain the subject matter well enough in your own words (they run them through plagiarism checking software), then it proves that you understand it.

One thing that the online classes did for me was improve my written communication skills a ton. Thanks to the military my communication skills were always good, but the amount of writing you do in online classes will still do a lot for improving that area.

Another thing to be aware of is how things are communicated in the class and within your learning teams. All the classes I took required individual work, as well as work with a team of 3 - 5 other students on one huge paper at the end. The problems come in when someone writes something online that someone else misinterprets.

Online communication lacks the nonverbal aspects of communication that you'd have in a "regular" classroom; things like body language, tone, facial expression, etc. So, sometimes people may take something personally even though it was never meant that way and it can lead to headaches if not resolves quickly and openly.

SteveZegers
11-02-2009, 08:32 AM
Same here, except that I did learn a good bit in the odd class or two where the subject was something I was completely clueless about beforehand (knocking out random electives, etc).

Expect to do a lot of writing. You can't take an exam like you do in a brick and mortar scenario. So, almost all of your work is in 500 - 2500 word papers. The idea being that if you can explain the subject matter well enough in your own words (they run them through plagiarism checking software), then it proves that you understand it.

One thing that the online classes did for me was improve my written communication skills a ton. Thanks to the military my communication skills were always good, but the amount of writing you do in online classes will still do a lot for improving that area.

Another thing to be aware of is how things are communicated in the class and within your learning teams. All the classes I took required individual work, as well as work with a team of 3 - 5 other students on one huge paper at the end. The problems come in when someone writes something online that someone else misinterprets.

Online communication lacks the nonverbal aspects of communication that you'd have in a "regular" classroom; things like body language, tone, facial expression, etc. So, sometimes people may take something personally even though it was never meant that way and it can lead to headaches if not resolves quickly and openly.

Mine were much easier. I did one at the U of Phoenix to complete a prerequirement from grad school, and took a few classes this way while going to the New School. They were run pretty much like a message board. The professor would ask a question and we were just required to check in and participate in the conversation. I had a few papers, but nothing substantial.

LordKinbote
11-02-2009, 09:09 AM
Mine were much easier. I did one at the U of Phoenix to complete a prerequirement from grad school, and took a few classes this way while going to the New School. They were run pretty much like a message board. The professor would ask a question and we were just required to check in and participate in the conversation. I had a few papers, but nothing substantial.

I've taken one master's class online for a Teacher Certification requirement. We participated in message board conversations (at least one original thread, and at least two replies to other people). Each week, we took a multiple choice quiz, and we were also responsible for an 8-page paper and a 40-minute Powerpoint presentation. Then there was a 35 question final exam, which was basically questions culled from the original test.

So not too bad. The most time-consuming part was probably the weekly reading, and certainly the most annoying part was that I was writing a paper the day before my wedding and finishing the presentation before and after my honeymoon.