PDA

View Full Version : Chevy Volt to get "230 mpg"



Ryudo
08-11-2009, 06:59 AM
http://money.cnn.com/2009/08/11/autos/volt_mpg/index.htm?postversion=2009081108


NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- The Chevrolet Volt, GM's electric car that's expected to go on sale in late 2010, is projected to get an estimated 230 miles per gallon, the automaker announced Tuesday.

That exceptionally high government mileage rating could give the Volt a major boost. For the first time, car buyers will easily be able to compare electric cars with ordinary gas-powered cars.

"Having a car that gets triple-digit fuel economy can and will be a game changer for us," said GM CEO Fritz Henderson.

Determining fuel economy for an electric car is a tricky matter, and General Motors (GM, Fortune 500) has been working with the Environmental Protection Agency for years on the issue.

Basically, you will be able to drive the Volt for about 40 miles using the lithium-ion batteries. For those driving less than that, gas mileage is essentially unlimited. It is only after 40 miles that the Volt will start using gas.

"Most Volt drivers will operate on a daily basis without having to use a single drop of gas," said Henderson, saying that three out of four drivers travel 40 miles or less a day.
50 mpg? or 5,000?

Fuel economy for hybrid vehicles like the Toyota Prius is displayed in the same way as it is for any other gasoline-powered vehicle. It gets 46 mpg, for example, versus 19 mpg for a V-6 Ford Mustang.

That standard works because all the energy used by the Prius ultimately comes from burning gasoline. The Prius just uses that energy more efficiently than other cars do.

The Chevrolet Volt, on other hand, runs on electricity that comes from two sources -- a battery as well as a gasoline engine.

When gasoline is providing the power, the Volt might get as much as 50 mpg. But that mpg figure would not take into account that the car has already gone 40 miles with no gas at all.

So let's say the car is driven 50 miles in a day. For the first 40 miles, no gas is used and during the last 10 miles, 0.2 gallons are used. That's the equivalent of 250 miles per gallon. But, if the driver continues on to 80 miles, total fuel economy would drop to about 100 mpg. And if the driver goes 300 miles, the fuel economy would be just 62.5 mpg.

The Volt will need to plugged in at night to recharge. The company said it estimates it will need 10 kilowatt hours for the recharge necessary to travel 40 miles. That should cost a total of about 40 cents at off-peak electricity rates in Detroit, Henderson said.

Making -- and selling -- the Volt

The EPA rating for the Volt is based on a draft report and applies to city driving. Henderson said GM is confident that when Volt's combined city/highway mileage average is calculated, it will be over 100 mpg.

But GM is obviously focused on the 230 mpg estimate as part of its early marketing campaign for the vehicle. It unveiled a logo with the number 230, with the zero looking like a cross between a smiley face and electrical plug.

GM started pre-production of the car in June is making about 10 a month. "Volt is becoming very real, very fast," Henderson said.

Henderson conceded the cost of building a Volt will be expensive, about $40,000 per vehicle. But he said the vehicle will qualify for a $7,500 tax credit, which will reduce the vehicle cost by that amount for consumers.

He also stressed that GM has not set the pricing for the Volt, and conceded the company may have to subsidize the vehicle. The goal: Make enough sales to move the Volt from "first generation" to lower-cost future designs.

"The cost of the vehicle in the first generation is high," he said.

Foolish Mortal
08-11-2009, 07:04 AM
Mmm, yeah the real mileage isn't going to be that high.

RebootedCorpse
08-11-2009, 07:13 AM
Great! This is the kind of thinking that could save GM. Too bad it's coming so late.

ClintP
08-11-2009, 07:41 AM
I wonder how much juice it takes to top off the batteries at home. What will that make your electric bill look like? I would be running an extension cord from my neighbors house or something.

EDIT - Just saw the 10 kilowatt hours. Interesting.

bartleby
08-11-2009, 08:03 AM
Mmm, yeah the real mileage isn't going to be that high.

For the most part, the gas mileage is almost completely insignificant. As long as you're no exceeding normal commuting distance between charges, the car doesn't even kick in to using fuel.

maverick-99
08-11-2009, 08:06 AM
But gas will most certainly be $5/gallon soon.....

Maxwell
08-11-2009, 08:09 AM
Hopefully within 10 years, this sort of car will be the norm.

Ashwin Pande
08-11-2009, 08:15 AM
What's the top speed?

A lot of people don't really care that much about mileage and care more about speed and the look of the car.

Which I find ridiculous since the same people spend most of their time in traffic and rarely drive on highways where the top speed actually comes into play.

Ryudo
08-11-2009, 08:17 AM
But gas will most certainly be $5/gallon soon.....

It won't go back up that high.

maverick-99
08-11-2009, 08:32 AM
It won't go back up that high.

You're kidding yourself.

The only way to force the hand of car companies to make more economical cars is to raise the price of gas.

Foolish Mortal
08-11-2009, 08:36 AM
You're kidding yourself.

The only way to force the hand of car companies to make more economical cars is to raise the price of gas.
Going bankrupt and now being beholden to taxpayers has already forced their hand in that regard.

Marcdachamp
08-11-2009, 09:25 AM
But the real question is, can it make Optimus Prime and Jetfire combine?

dEnny!
08-11-2009, 09:33 AM
I'm finding out that my Chevy Equinox isn't currently getting 32 mpg as rated on the highway, of course I've not been on the highway for an entire tank of gas and I'm sure A/C and rate of speed determines mpg.

It is getting better than my Saturn Vue though.

dEnny!
08-11-2009, 09:35 AM
That's not a bad looking car.

http://i2.cdn.turner.com/money/2009/08/11/autos/volt_mpg/chevy_volt_230mpg.03.jpg

Foolish Mortal
08-11-2009, 09:49 AM
That's not a bad looking car.

http://i2.cdn.turner.com/money/2009/08/11/autos/volt_mpg/chevy_volt_230mpg.03.jpg
Love the backdrop with the cheesy graphic. :lol:

batmanbooyah
08-11-2009, 09:53 AM
the outlet looks kind of constipated, but happy he's about to poop.

Brian Defferding
08-12-2009, 06:16 AM
Let's see:

-The government owns GM, the government also owns the EPA who does ratings. 230 mpg might as well have been made up by Goldman Sachs or Hugo Chavez.

From the real info I can get about the car, it can go 40 miles on battery alone, and after 40 miles the gas generator kicks in to charge the battery (note: not to power the car).

Eliminating 2 separate movement systems may save overhead, but I'm still thinking the real MPG estimates (after the 40 miles wears out from battery) may be in the range of between 40-70. It's still fantastic though, don't get me wrong, and I'm all for this, but GovernmentMotors is probably exaggerating here.

MIKE D
08-12-2009, 07:18 AM
It won't go back up that high.

That's a bit naive. Once they found that people would pay that, it now will certainly be shoved up that high the next time market conditions allow for it.

PatrickA
08-12-2009, 07:27 AM
From the real info I can get about the car, it can go 40 miles on battery alone, and after 40 miles the gas generator kicks in to charge the battery (note: not to power the car).

Isn't that exactly what the article in the original post basically says?

Brian Defferding
08-12-2009, 07:29 AM
Isn't that exactly what the article in the original post basically says?

Yes. I was just illustrating how much they're stretching out their claims :)

Dan
08-12-2009, 08:24 AM
Nissan's Leaf is supposed to get 367 mpg and be cheaper too.

Take that Government Motors!

chrisfasowned
08-12-2009, 08:31 AM
Nissan's Leaf is supposed to get 367 mpg and be cheaper too.

Take that Government Motors!

i thought the leaf was 100% electric... it should get a BILLION miles per gallon!

Dan
08-12-2009, 08:36 AM
http://content.usatoday.com/communities/driveon/post/2009/08/68496729/1

It would seem a new term needs to be created.

WinterRose
08-12-2009, 01:51 PM
http://content.usatoday.com/communities/driveon/post/2009/08/68496729/1

It would seem a new term needs to be created.

Oddly, I'd like to see a way for the car's onboard computer to diagnose current running conditions, then compare that to the amount of potential stored in the battery and give you an estimate of miles it can travel under worst possible conditions. IE: You charge your car overnight, and then when you hop in to go to work, the car tells you how many miles it thinks you can travel.

Dan
08-13-2009, 04:37 AM
I'm sure that's doable, my car already tells me how many miles it thinks I have left before my gas tank is empty, and it's just a base model Altima.

JHickman
08-13-2009, 04:44 AM
Hopefully within 10 years, this sort of car will be the norm.

Of course it will. This is why people generally shouldn't get hysterical about running out of fossil fuels or how we are going to power the future.

We're an extremely innovative race. As soon as we actually need something we go out and create it.

bartleby
08-13-2009, 04:55 AM
Of course it will. This is why people generally shouldn't get hysterical about running out of fossil fuels or how we are going to power the future.

We're an extremely innovative race. As soon as we actually need something we go out and create it.

I dunno. This sounds like a chicken-and-egg conundrum. Is it really a case of people not needing to get hysterical about running out of fossil fuels because cars like this are being invented? Or is it that cars like this are being invented because people were getting hysterical about running out of fossil fuels?

Foolish Mortal
08-13-2009, 05:12 AM
We're an extremely innovative race. As soon as we actually need something we go out and create it.
http://img294.imageshack.us/img294/4526/flintstonesmedium.jpg (http://www.imagehosting.com/)

Evan the Shaggy
08-13-2009, 05:16 AM
But gas will most certainly be $5/gallon soon.....

Very unlikely. Gasoline being $4 a gallon had a serious hand in the credit debacle which in turn had a hand in the recession. Demand plummeted, causing gas prices to plummet as well.

In my mind, speculation was the biggest factor in determining prices rather than looking at the actual supply and demand figures and with the government taking a harder stance on this as well as energy stocks not being the hedge fund parachutes they were previously, don't expect to see even $4 gallons of gas anytime soon.

JHickman
08-13-2009, 06:56 AM
I dunno. This sounds like a chicken-and-egg conundrum. Is it really a case of people not needing to get hysterical about running out of fossil fuels because cars like this are being invented? Or is it that cars like this are being invented because people were getting hysterical about running out of fossil fuels?

Certain people overreact. Certain people go out and change the world.

There's a long history (our entire history actually) of man's innovation. Sometimes it's out of necessity, sometimes we go to the moon. It's pretty much who we are and the one of the few things that a historical constant.

JHickman
08-13-2009, 06:58 AM
http://img294.imageshack.us/img294/4526/flintstonesmedium.jpg (http://www.imagehosting.com/)

:)

Xander Boune
08-13-2009, 07:01 AM
But the real question is, can it make Optimus Prime and Jetfire combine?

I laughed.

CapnChaos
08-13-2009, 07:11 AM
As of now, I'd still rather have a diesel VW. (Not a bug. Yuck.) But if they can reign in costs, I could see it getting very popular, especially in urban areas. If they can't reign in cost, then it's just another debacle.

My main hope is the government won't be making us pay for them whether we buy them or not with huge subsidies for a failed product.

Brian Defferding
08-18-2011, 03:57 PM
http://autos.yahoo.com/news/is-chevy-volt-running-out-of-juice-.html


Is Chevy Volt Running Out of Juice?

Is the Chevrolet Volt running out of juice? Even as the maker begins its long-promised production ramp-up, a new study suggests that potential buyers are rapidly losing interest in the plug-in hybrid vehicle.

Introduced last December, Volt is one of the first new vehicles to test the potential market for electric propulsion. It has been going head-to-head with Nissan’s pure battery-electric LEAF. Sales of the two vehicles have been marginal, at best, though the makers insist that has more to do with limited supply than buyer demand.

Through the end of July, Chevy has sold about 3,200 of the plug-in hybrids compared to 4,500 Nissan Leafs. But both makers have begun ramping up production, General Motors forecasting sales of around 16,000 for the year as a whole – including a small number of Volt clone Opel Amperas targeted at markets abroad.

But a new study by CNW marketing raises a red flag, finding that the potential buyers GM is most counting on are rapidly losing interest in the Volt. In March, 21% of so-called Early Adapters said they were “very likely” to consider buying a Volt, while 38.1% said they were “likely” to do the same. That slipped to 14.6% saying “very likely” in July, and 31.1% “likely.” Among EV Enthusiasts, reports the CNW study, the number of those likely or very likely to consider Volt fell from a combined 71% to 51% during the same four-month period.

“It’s way too early to tell, but the signs aren’t encouraging,” said CNW’s chief analyst Art Spinella.
When it comes to mainstream consumers Volt has all but slipped off the radar screen, only about 3% of new car buyers likely to consider the Chevrolet Volt, the analyst added.

The big problem is the plug-in’s price, CNW data indicate. When first introduced, the Volt carried a $41,000 sticker, though it qualified for a $7,500 federal tax credit. For 2012, the Chevy will drop to $39,995, a $1,005 cut, though it is still thousands more than the Leaf – and nearly double the price of a base Chevrolet Cruze compact, which shares the same underpinnings as Volt.

Chevy officials defend the price tag, pointing to the complexity of the dual gas-electric hybrid drivetrain. Volt is capable of clocking more than 35 miles on battery power alone. While that’s less than half of the range of the Nissan electric vehicle, the Chevy can shift to gas power and keep driving once its batteries run down.

GM officials remain convinced that Volt will meet their expectations, noting the vehicle doesn’t need to generate a wide appeal to still reach sales targets – which the maker projects will grow to 40,000 in 2012, including both Volt and Ampera.

GM’s commitment to electric propulsion is, if anything, being charged up. As TheDetroitBureau.com reported last week, the maker has inked a deal with battery supplier A123 that will be used for a range of new battery-electric vehicles that will begin to reach market in 2014.

Foolish Mortal
08-18-2011, 04:05 PM
The number one obstacle remains the price. Until the Volt becomes competitive with gas and hybrid models, many consumers will not bite.

But like most new consumer technologies, they always start off expensive, and as time moves along and parts get cheaper to manufacture and competitors start introducing their versions, the price will drop.

BriRedfern
08-18-2011, 05:05 PM
How long until GM starts buying back all the Volts on the road and hoarding them on an abandoned air field somewhere?