PDA

View Full Version : Are Marvel characters more relatable than DC because of their costumes?



skinnyrunaway
03-28-2009, 08:21 AM
I'm looking at the Eaglemoss figurines thread, and as I'm looking through the different companies figures, and I'm noticing that the Marvel characters seem to look more realistic than the DC ones. They look more like figurines of real people rather than comic book characters.

I think it comes down to the costumes.

Maybe I'm crazy.

http://www.marvel-figurines.co.uk/graphics/figures-graphics/fig-bottom/fig-bottom09/fig-bottom09_r1_c1.jpg
Vs.
http://www.eaglemoss.com/dc/images/02_figurines/lg_figs/02_lg_fig.jpghttp://www.eaglemoss.com/dc/images/02_figurines/lg_figs/05_lg_fig.jpghttp://www.eaglemoss.com/dc/images/02_figurines/lg_figs/08_lg_fig.jpghttp://www.eaglemoss.com/dc/images/02_figurines/lg_figs/11_lg_fig.jpghttp://www.eaglemoss.com/dc/images/02_figurines/lg_figs/17_lg_fig.jpg

Ray G.
03-28-2009, 08:23 AM
No.

Most of the characters you posted have uniforms, not costumes, for one thing.

I think some Marvel heroes (namely Spider-man and the X-men) are more relatable due to their backstory, while others, like Iron Man, Thor, or Cap, are really no more relatable than Superman, Batman, or the Flash.

TIP
03-28-2009, 08:23 AM
:rofl:

gomi
03-28-2009, 08:24 AM
I'm gonna say it's the writing. ;)

But I do agree that some of DC's costumes are a bit over the top. To be fair, Marvel also has it's share of boo-boos, but I think DC wins the bad costume battle easily.

MAK15
03-28-2009, 08:27 AM
naw.

Marvel characters are more relatable because they act more human than a lot of DC's characters.

Ashwin Pande
03-28-2009, 08:38 AM
So this is what it's come to huh?

Caley Tibbittz
03-28-2009, 08:44 AM
No.

Most of the characters you posted have uniforms, not costumes, for one thing.

I think some Marvel heroes (namely Spider-man and the X-men) are more relatable due to their backstory, while others, like Iron Man, Thor, or Cap, are really no more relatable than Superman, Batman, or the Flash.

Iron Man's alcoholism makes him more relatable than the DC heroes.

THWIP!
03-28-2009, 08:44 AM
So this is what it's come to huh?

:lol:

Artie Pink
03-28-2009, 09:04 AM
It's all about the Editor. J. Jonah Jameson vs. Perry White.

Kids today love newspapermen. Jameson, love him or loathe him, just has a zing that White does not.

Add to this the recent article in Science Weekly (http://www.scienceweeklyonline/march09/marvel_editorial_superiority_chalked_up_to_fiction al_editor), where Dr. Carla Gupta speculates that because Marvel has the stronger fictional editor, their actual editors are emboldened to make stronger choices, whereas DC's editors are subconsiously weak and ineffectual. Fascinating stuff, check it out.

Remember, when you see Jameson whipping up a frenzy in the Marvel Universe, what he's actually doing is whipping up a fan frenzy. Meanwhile, Perry White can't even match wits with Jimmy Olsen. Think about it. It's a lot more plausible than your attributing your own personal aesthetic about costumes to make an impossible generalization. Great Caesar's Ghost!

Ultimate Lurker
03-28-2009, 09:07 AM
People having some weird ideas recently, huh?

c.rob
03-28-2009, 09:10 AM
It's all about the Editor. J. Jonah Jameson vs. Perry White.

Kids today love newspapermen. Jameson, love him or loathe him, just has a zing that White does not.

Add to this the recent article in Science Weekly (http://www.scienceweeklyonline/march09/marvel_editorial_superiority_chalked_up_to_fiction al_editor), where Dr. Carla Gupta speculates that because Marvel has the stronger fictional editor, their actual editors are emboldened to make stronger choices, whereas DC's editors are subconsiously weak and ineffectual. Fascinating stuff, check it out.

Remember, when you see Jameson whipping up a frenzy in the Marvel Universe, what he's actually doing is whipping up a fan frenzy. Meanwhile, Perry White can't even match wits with Jimmy Olsen. Think about it. It's a lot more plausible than your attributing your own personal aesthetic about costumes to make an impossible generalization. Great Caesar's Ghost!

that is absolutely brilliant.

HOOKS
03-28-2009, 09:13 AM
For me, blue swashbuckling devils and dead Jewish chicks with pet purple dragons will always relate more to me than over tanned orange chicks with green eyes, an alien from another planet who looks just like your average white guy, and bald businessmen who dress up in green and purple suits of armor.

Jason California
03-28-2009, 09:13 AM
Marvel heroes are just a screwed up as you or I. DC characters or more idealized heroes.

Nick Spencer
03-28-2009, 09:14 AM
It's all about the Editor. J. Jonah Jameson vs. Perry White.

Kids today love newspapermen. Jameson, love him or loathe him, just has a zing that White does not.

Add to this the recent article in Science Weekly (http://www.scienceweeklyonline/march09/marvel_editorial_superiority_chalked_up_to_fiction al_editor), where Dr. Carla Gupta speculates that because Marvel has the stronger fictional editor, their actual editors are emboldened to make stronger choices, whereas DC's editors are subconsiously weak and ineffectual. Fascinating stuff, check it out.

Remember, when you see Jameson whipping up a frenzy in the Marvel Universe, what he's actually doing is whipping up a fan frenzy. Meanwhile, Perry White can't even match wits with Jimmy Olsen. Think about it. It's a lot more plausible than your attributing your own personal aesthetic about costumes to make an impossible generalization. Great Caesar's Ghost!

There is so much wrong with this. Perry is a great character, and plenty strong in his own right. He may not be a blowhard, but he's about a 1000x better editor, which kinda renders the central point moot.

~Spider-man~
03-28-2009, 09:18 AM
For me it's always been the stories that makes the Marvel heroes seem more realistic. It's not just the costumes that make the heroes but rather their actions with the abilities they have.

gomi
03-28-2009, 09:22 AM
"SUPERMAN: HERO OR MENACE?" just doesn't work as a headline.

NickT
03-28-2009, 09:24 AM
I think bad costumes can hurt characters, but I wouldn't say it's a Marvel/DC thing.

RickLM
03-28-2009, 09:24 AM
Peter Parker was created to be not much different than the geeky kids who were buying comics. That's where it started.

I don't think its the costumes, because both companies have given us over-the-top stupid costumes.

Whip
03-28-2009, 09:27 AM
:lol: @ people taking this seriously.

Artie Pink
03-28-2009, 09:37 AM
There is so much wrong with this. Perry is a great character, and plenty strong in his own right. He may not be a blowhard, but he's about a 1000x better editor, which kinda renders the central point moot.


You know that, Nick, and I know that... but try telling little Dustin and Jake and Ashylynn and De'Andre that.

Over on the playgrounds, kids in 2009 would rather see Pulse reporter Jessica Jones take it up the A than watch Lois hatch another Pulitzer worthy scheme to trick Superman into marrying her. They don't care that Jimmy is reinventing himself to interview the Guardian; they just wanna see Ben Urich take another sai to the back.

Jameson calls Spider-Man a "menace" and the kids see "bad-ass". Meanwhile, Superman's up on the roof of the Daily Planet working WITH Perry to stop Intergang from its hostile takeover of S.T.A.R. Labs. That's not what kids today want out of their heroes... or editors.

TIP
03-28-2009, 09:47 AM
De'Andre!!!

RickLM
03-28-2009, 09:48 AM
Over on the playgrounds, kids in 2009 would rather see Pulse reporter Jessica Jones take it up the A




This thread is awesome.

Foolish Mortal
03-28-2009, 09:52 AM
I'm gonna say it's the writing. ;)

But I do agree that some of DC's costumes are a bit over the top. To be fair, Marvel also has it's share of boo-boos, but I think DC wins the bad costume battle easily.
Yep it's the writing.

Foolish Mortal
03-28-2009, 10:02 AM
You know that, Nick, and I know that... but try telling little Dustin and Jake and Ashylynn and De'Andre that.

Over on the playgrounds, kids in 2009 would rather see Pulse reporter Jessica Jones take it up the A than watch Lois hatch another Pulitzer worthy scheme to trick Superman into marrying her. They don't care that Jimmy is reinventing himself to interview the Guardian; they just wanna see Ben Urich take another sai to the back.

Jameson calls Spider-Man a "menace" and the kids see "bad-ass". Meanwhile, Superman's up on the roof of the Daily Planet working WITH Perry to stop Intergang from its hostile takeover of S.T.A.R. Labs. That's not what kids today want out of their heroes... or editors.
Yep. Perry White is a sharp, intelligent man of strong moral character, who can be a bit guff, but deep down a good guy.

J. Jonah Jameson is a sharp, intelligent man of mostly moral character, who can be an absolute jackass at times, but deep down is really a good guy.

Jameson is more realistically flawed in my opinion which creates the illusion that he's more "real".

nick maynard
03-28-2009, 10:06 AM
the dragon and the guy with the tail really reek of realism.

NickT
03-28-2009, 10:08 AM
Yep it's the writing.But you still have to get to reading it to find that out. Vampirella could be the best book ever, I wont be finding out :)

Ashwin Pande
03-28-2009, 10:13 AM
Good god.

dasNdanger
03-28-2009, 10:13 AM
the dragon and the guy with the tail really reek of realism.


Obviously, you've never been to Colorado... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_39DMM7Rh0


das

Artie Pink
03-28-2009, 10:19 AM
Yep. Perry White is a sharp, intelligent man of strong moral character, who can be a bit guff, but deep down a good guy.

J. Jonah Jameson is a sharp, intelligent man of mostly moral character, who can be an absolute jackass at times, but deep down is really a good guy.

Jameson is more realistically flawed in my opinion which creates the illusion that he's more "real".


Yep. When a kid aspires to be the editor of his school paper, he wants to be Jameson, not White. He wants to take on the jocks and the preps. He wants to shine a light on the so-called beautiful things and expose them for what they are. Not like Perry Whitebread, who embraces the shiny and polished status quo.

Plus. You say "Jameson" on the board (or even "Jonah"), and everyone will know who you mean. You say "White" or "Perry" and no one will give a shit. THAT'S why DC is failing and Marvel is at the top of the rock.

Ashwin Pande
03-28-2009, 10:26 AM
Yep. When a kid aspires to be the editor of his school paper, he wants to be Jameson, not White. He wants to take on the jocks and the preps. He wants to shine a light on the so-called beautiful things and expose them for what they are. Not like Perry Whitebread, who embraces the shiny and polished status quo.

Plus. You say "Jameson" on the board (or even "Jonah"), and everyone will know who you mean. You say "White" or "Perry" and no one will give a shit. THAT'S why DC is failing and Marvel is at the top of the rock.

:heart:

RegHorsten
03-28-2009, 10:31 AM
Yep. Perry White is a sharp, intelligent man of strong moral character, who can be a bit guff, but deep down a good guy.

J. Jonah Jameson is a sharp, intelligent man of mostly moral character, who can be an absolute jackass at times, but deep down is really a good guy.

Jameson is more realistically flawed in my opinion which creates the illusion that he's more "real".


Yep. When a kid aspires to be the editor of his school paper, he wants to be Jameson, not White. He wants to take on the jocks and the preps. He wants to shine a light on the so-called beautiful things and expose them for what they are. Not like Perry Whitebread, who embraces the shiny and polished status quo.

Plus. You say "Jameson" on the board (or even "Jonah"), and everyone will know who you mean. You say "White" or "Perry" and no one will give a shit. THAT'S why DC is failing and Marvel is at the top of the rock.

http://i670.photobucket.com/albums/vv68/RegHorsten3/bird-pooping-on-child.jpg

DaveCummings
03-28-2009, 10:56 AM
No.

Most of the characters you posted have uniforms, not costumes, for one thing.

I think some Marvel heroes (namely Spider-man and the X-men) are more relatable due to their backstory, while others, like Iron Man, Thor, or Cap, are really no more relatable than Superman, Batman, or the Flash.


Not so much with Iron Man or Captain America. The reason why people can relate more towards the Marvel characters are because the characters have a lot of flaws, be it Peter Parker's nerdiness or Tony Stark's alcoholism. They all seem more human. DC, not so much...except for Batman, which a lot of people have said in the past that he's almost like a Marvel character stuck in the DC universe.

andrew french
03-28-2009, 11:07 AM
I like DC's costumes a lot more, but I don't think that lends to how relatable they are.

I just like the traditional aesthetic of DC's bigger heroes, but FF come in close.

RegularJoe
03-28-2009, 12:08 PM
i argue your premise more than your examples.

JAK
03-28-2009, 01:44 PM
By and large (and this has been said probably a thousand times before, though it is still a huge generalization) Marvel characters are more relatable because of the person underneath the costume- that is to say, the personality comes before the costume/powers, whereas with DC the iconic nature of the costumes/powers comes first- the heavy-duty legacy aspect of the characters testifies to this I believe.

Ashwin Pande
03-28-2009, 02:07 PM
This is like saying McDonalds are more popular than other burger chains because of their burger wrappers.

It's by far the dumbest topic of discussion I've seen here yet.

NickT
03-28-2009, 02:12 PM
This is like saying McDonalds are more popular than other burger chains because of their burger wrappers.

It's by far the dumbest topic of discussion I've seen here yet.
Well, that is why they spend lots of money on designing things ;)

nick maynard
03-28-2009, 02:26 PM
This is like saying McDonalds are more popular than other burger chains because of their burger wrappers.

It's by far the dumbest topic of discussion I've seen here yet.
more relatable doesn't equal better, though. i relate more to michael cera's character from superbad than let's say, hamlet, but obviously that doesn't make cera's character better.

Joe Kalicki
03-28-2009, 02:40 PM
I think it's laughable how you just generally assume Marvel characters are more relatable.

c. page
03-28-2009, 02:42 PM
I think it's laughable how you just generally assume Marvel characters are more relatable.

*bing*

AmirLehman
03-28-2009, 02:47 PM
more relatable doesn't equal better, though. i relate more to michael cera's character from superbad than let's say, hamlet, but obviously that doesn't make cera's character better.

Uh. More relatable does equal better. It makes for a more well-rounded reading experience.

Hamlet had a shitload of stuff to deal with. He was depressed, impulsive, and obsessive. He had major flaws, and when you read Hamlet, you get the sense that there is more to him than meets the eye.

Michael Cera couldn't get layed.

hotdogdownahallway
03-28-2009, 02:48 PM
How are characters more relatable due to something they wear?

Joe Kalicki
03-28-2009, 02:49 PM
Uh. More relatable does equal better. It makes for a more well-rounded reading experience.

Hamlet had a shitload of stuff to deal with. He was depressed, impulsive, and obsessive. He had major flaws, and when you read Hamlet, you get the sense that there is more to him than meets the eye.

Michael Cera couldn't get layed.

There is no objective "better," so your premise is flawed to begin with, aside from the fact you contradicted yourself in your own post.

Joe Kalicki
03-28-2009, 02:50 PM
How are characters more relatable due to something they wear?

How are they universally more relatable because of what they do/look like/whatever anyway? Everybody's different.

NickT
03-28-2009, 02:52 PM
Uh. More relatable does equal better. It makes for a more well-rounded reading experience.

Hamlet had a shitload of stuff to deal with. He was depressed, impulsive, and obsessive. He had major flaws, and when you read Hamlet, you get the sense that there is more to him than meets the eye.

Michael Cera couldn't get layed.
I disagree. I can't relate to the Punisher or Batman, but I'd still call them better characters than some who I can relate to.

AmirLehman
03-28-2009, 02:53 PM
There is no objective "better," so your premise is flawed to begin with, aside from the fact you contradicted yourself in your own post.

Oh, the impression I got was that Marvel characters = Relatability.

So what I meant was, when a character has more imperfections and flaws, it makes them more relatable to a larger audience. Michael Cera's character in Superbad was pretty flat. Hamlet, on the other hand, wasn't.

Edit: Not to say that Superbad wasn't funny or successful. It was. But for superheroes, the reason Marvel has consistently stayed ahead of DC is because of their characters.

Joe Kalicki
03-28-2009, 02:55 PM
Oh, the impression I got was that Marvel characters = Relatability.

So what I meant was, when a character has more imperfections and flaws, it makes them more relatable to a larger audience. Michael Cera's character in Superbad was pretty flat. Hamlet, on the other hand, wasn't.

But Michael Cera not getting laid is more relatable to most people than someone who's a bag of neurosis, I would think.

nick maynard
03-28-2009, 02:56 PM
Uh. More relatable does equal better. It makes for a more well-rounded reading experience.

Hamlet had a shitload of stuff to deal with. He was depressed, impulsive, and obsessive. He had major flaws, and when you read Hamlet, you get the sense that there is more to him than meets the eye.

Michael Cera couldn't get layed.

maybe we're defining "relatable" differently. the way you're talking about it, it sounds like you mean "depth". i think of "relatable" as how much of myself can i see in the character.

at one point in my life, i WAS michael cera's character from superbad. in high school, i hung out, got drunk, talked about porno i had seen on the internet, couldn't get a date, talked a lot about how hot i thought girl X was, had a bunch of loser best friends, hung out in my parent's basement, etc.

i've never had family members kill each other or girlfriends kill themselves. i've never been a prince in denmark. i have so much more in common with michael cera's character than i do with hamlet. i relate more to michael cera's character.

but hamlet is obviously the better character. relatability does not equal quality or depth.

Armored Dildo
03-28-2009, 02:56 PM
People having some weird ideas recently, huh?

I'm liking these threads. The notions expressed in the topics are so obvious for, and particular to, the people who create them, but read as sooooo random for everyone else, that's they're amusing.

And for the record, there is more muscle tone in the Marvel figures. Not sure if that means they are more "relatable" to me or not but I wouldn't have noticed that feature otherwise if you didn't ask, skinnyrunaway.

RickLM
03-28-2009, 03:01 PM
I think it's laughable how you just generally assume Marvel characters are more relatable.



But you have to admit they're sharp dressers.

Maestro
03-28-2009, 04:11 PM
I think it's part of it. DC costumes seem kinda lame and stuck in the 1950's

Dr. Omega
03-28-2009, 11:50 PM
At least in modern terms, I switched for two reasons:

1) Marvel has more relatable stories. Superhuman registration act? I get that. We have the Patriot Act and the asinine Airline rules. Things like that. 52 multiple universes? Monitors? Prime Punch? Mind Munch? Super Miracle singing? That is just cosmic Morrison nonsense. I can much more easily imagine myself in the Marvel U. than the DCU.

2) Marvel is moving their stuff forward. Osborne in charge. Bucky as Cap. World War Hulk. These are some major changes to the characters. Very progressive stuff. I like new and different. And there are some great stories. I find myself liking Norman Osbourne. DC on the other hand is moving backward at warp speed. They have introduced dozens of 70's ideas (or older) that were horrid. I thought we had moved passed it all. The Krytonians coming back in the Superman books (that don't actually contain Superman) is a great example. Worse, now they are reversing deaths and such from just a few years ago. This is regressive and confusing. Where Marvel continues to progress to new and interesting ideas, DC Devolves into a chaotic mess with no direction. Superman and Batman are now both gone from the DCU for awhile. Didn't they just do that in 52? Wasn't that the point? A year without Superman and Batman and Wonder Woman.

Blandy vs Terrorism
03-28-2009, 11:51 PM
This thread title si the stupidest Marvel vs DC thoery Iv'e read yet. And that's saying something.

oconnellmd
03-29-2009, 12:06 AM
kids in 2009 would rather see Pulse reporter Jessica Jones take it up the A than watch Lois hatch another Pulitzer worthy scheme to trick Superman into marrying her.

Maybe DC would be more hip for the kids if Lois took it up the A. Didio should keep an open mind...

Blandy vs Terrorism
03-29-2009, 12:10 AM
I'd like to see Teri Hatcher, playing Lois Lane, taking it up the ass.

Ashwin Pande
03-29-2009, 01:45 AM
I think both companies should make books which have all their characters naked.

Then we'll finally see what's what!!!

oconnellmd
03-29-2009, 03:16 AM
I think both companies should make books which have all their characters naked.

Then we'll finally see what's what!!!

I vote against that in "Hulk".

Don't need to see that.

Green OR red...

Ashwin Pande
03-29-2009, 04:15 AM
I vote against that in "Hulk".

Don't need to see that.

Green OR red...

His 20 inch green dong is what makes him relatable to me.

Nerdzner
03-29-2009, 09:10 AM
No.

Most of the characters you posted have uniforms, not costumes, for one thing.

I think some Marvel heroes (namely Spider-man and the X-men) are more relatable due to their backstory, while others, like Iron Man, Thor, or Cap, are really no more relatable than Superman, Batman, or the Flash.

I agree. For me though, I can't make up my mind as to which company has more relatable characters....I go back and forth all the time in my head. :scared:

--Nerdzner

skinnyrunaway
03-29-2009, 09:16 AM
:)

I'm loving this.

Joe Kalicki
03-29-2009, 10:47 AM
Anyone who likes comics because "I can easily imagine myself in that world" or because "they use the real President, so it feels like it takes place in the real world" is a sociopath.

Ashwin Pande
03-29-2009, 10:49 AM
Anyone who likes comics because "I can easily imagine myself in that world" or because "they use the real President, so it feels like it takes place in the real world" is a sociopath.

Superhero Comics.

Kefky
03-29-2009, 11:04 AM
This whole "relatability" thing is all in the fanboy's head.