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Jason California
07-03-2008, 10:25 AM
crazy.

Dial-up users "don't want broadband" 9:47AM, Thursday 3rd July 2008
http://www.pcpro.co.uk/picture_library/dir_196/it_portal_pic_98301_t.jpg (http://www.pcpro.co.uk/news/210186/dialup-users-dont-want-broadband.html#) The majority of dial-up internet users say they don't want to upgrade their connection to broadband, according to a new study in the US. The Pew Internet research found that 62% of dial-up users had no interest in upgrading to a high-speed connection.
When asked what it would take to tempt them to switch, 35% said the price of broadband would have to fall, while almost a fifth said that nothing would tempt them to upgrade, suggesting many die-hard dial-up users simply http://adfarm.mediaplex.com/ad/bn/2397-58840-22030-1?mpt=1134256 (http://ad.doubleclick.net/click%3Bh=v8/36f2/3/0/%2a/w%3B204672508%3B0-0%3B0%3B11256900%3B4307-300/250%3B27037950/27055807/1%3B%3B%7Esscs%3D%3fhttp://adfarm.mediaplex.com/ad/ck/2397-58840-22030-1?mpt=1134256)

don't see the need for the higher speeds that are available.
The availability of broadband is also a problem for many US users, with 14% saying they simply couldn't get broadband in their area. By contrast, BT claims that more than 99% of British households have access to broadband, although speeds remain a huge problem for those living in rural areas.
Predictably, the Pew study shows that low-income households and the elderly are the least likely to have a broadband connection, although the report claims that a person's attitude towards the benefits (http://www.pcpro.co.uk/news/210186/dialup-users-dont-want-broadband.html#) of technology in their lives is also a deciding factor.
"An older person may love to tinker with technology and enjoy the 'always on' information pipeline that broadband offers," the report claims. "A person in a low-income household may be willing to allocate scarce discretionary funds to broadband - if he feels the connectivity offers something of value."

bartleby
07-03-2008, 10:31 AM
I can understand not wanting to pay extra for broadband, but the 20% who said they just don't want it, well that just baffles me.

Gregory
07-03-2008, 10:32 AM
I don't think I'd ever leave my computer if I had broadband at home.

Kirblar
07-03-2008, 10:32 AM
They probably have never used it.

CougarTrace
07-03-2008, 10:33 AM
I believe if broadband were free or much cheaper all people would use broadband (where available)

William Satterwhite
07-03-2008, 10:34 AM
I can kind of understand it, I assume that most dial-up users probably don't use the internet enough to care.

juampi
07-03-2008, 10:37 AM
Most of dial-up users only use the e-mail...

Nick MB
07-03-2008, 10:43 AM
Certainly in the UK, broadband is reasonably readily available and you can get at least some form of it for a fairly good price. At this stage, I'd imagine that a lot of people who still have dial-up either can't get broadband or don't want it. So yeah, not too surprising.

Kingsumo
07-03-2008, 10:47 AM
They probably have never used it.

I think this is most likely the case. If you don't know what you are missing, you won't see the need.

I would say if they were given a trial of broadband for a month of two, and then asked, it would probably be a different number set.

Evan the Shaggy
07-03-2008, 10:47 AM
Huh? Why would you not want something better if it was free?

emeraldsundae
07-03-2008, 10:50 AM
Yeah, I have broadband at home and I love it... sometimes I'm on my computer all day, chatting and just doing menial internet stuff just because I can.

Visiting my boyfriend right now and he has dial-up.... I'm trying to get him to switch to something better, but his parents don't see the need.

Strikeout
07-03-2008, 10:52 AM
I can kind of understand it, I assume that most dial-up users probably don't use the internet enough to care.

That summarizes my parent's point of view perfectly.

TheKraken
07-03-2008, 10:52 AM
People really like the connection sounds.

schizorabbit
07-03-2008, 11:00 AM
Most of dial-up users only use the e-mail...

And probably half of those are old people who are still trying to figure out how to fit envelopes into the floppy disc slot. "Dagnabit, how come this envelope won't fit???

rychehitman
07-03-2008, 11:02 AM
it took me 38 minutes for this page to load with all these damn signatures and such!

Kingsumo
07-03-2008, 11:03 AM
it took me 38 minutes for this page to load with all these damn signatures and such!

You can turn those off you know.

mario
07-03-2008, 11:04 AM
I too would not want boradband, but I can't live without broadband!

dasNdanger
07-03-2008, 03:19 PM
I want SOMETHING faster than dial-up, but won't deal with my cable company...I hatesies them. But I'm all for a faster connection...just not one through Comcast (and no, fios and dsl are not yet available in my area).


das

HoldFastNow
07-03-2008, 03:28 PM
Even if they don't care about speed, I would think they would like the convenience of always being connected.

CapnChaos
07-03-2008, 03:30 PM
They don't seem to say how many dial-up users there are, though. It's a pretty small number these days, I would think.

Foolish Mortal
07-03-2008, 03:31 PM
Huh? Why would you not want something better if it was free?
For people who aren't computer savvy, there's an assumption that broadband is more "complicated" to use than the dial-up they've used for years and gotten comfortable with.

I think there still a kind of computer "phobia" that still inflicts a lot of people. Particularly older people.

Justin.Strange
07-03-2008, 04:12 PM
I use dial up and hate it. Thing is, this computer is old. So old it can't keep up with my growing demands for schoolwork and such.

That said, I'm far more concerned with getting a new computer before I invest in high speed internet.

Thudpucker
07-03-2008, 04:13 PM
For people who aren't computer savvy, there's an assumption that broadband is more "complicated" to use than the dial-up they've used for years and gotten comfortable with.

I think there still a kind of computer "phobia" that still inflicts a lot of people. Particularly older people.

Yep, alot of my older relatives fear making any changes to thier computers, they just leave well enough alone. They pretty much only use it to email and play card games on yahoo.

Jason California
07-03-2008, 04:54 PM
http://news.cnet.com/AOL-hanging-up-on-dial-up-customers/2100-1025_3-6043910.html

This is dated 2006. The number of dial ups have to be very small at this point.

About 5 million people in the U.S. pay $15 per month for an AOL subscription and then pay a different Internet service provider for high-speed Internet access under AOL's Bring Your Own Access plan, Bentley said. By bundling high-speed access and AOL service for $25.90 a month, AOL is offering a package alternative to members who are now paying for their AOL service and high-speed access separately.

Shepherd
07-03-2008, 04:57 PM
That's crazy. Dial-up isn't even available anymore in Korea. I just assumed it had disappeared in the US too, but I guess not.

R

Jason California
07-03-2008, 04:59 PM
That's crazy. Dial-up isn't even available anymore in Korea. I just assumed it had disappeared in the US too, but I guess not.

R

The states are very behind when it comes to tech. We are generally behind 1-2 generations.

Shepherd
07-03-2008, 05:02 PM
The states are very behind when it comes to tech. We are generally behind 1-2 generations.

Yeah, I noticed that when I first moved here. Stuff was (and is) way faster. But dial-up was already gone when I moved here 4 years ago. The US is slooooooow.

R

Jason California
07-03-2008, 05:06 PM
Yeah, I noticed that when I first moved here. Stuff was (and is) way faster. But dial-up was already gone when I moved here 4 years ago. The US is slooooooow.

R


One of the good things about that is that we let others work out the kinks in technology. by the time it gets to us it is a lot more affordable and more reliable.

mike black
07-03-2008, 05:07 PM
I can understand not wanting to pay extra for broadband, but the 20% who said they just don't want it, well that just baffles me.

Purposefully obstenant. We used to talk to these people all the time at AOL, and usually the deciding factor is "You won't get disconnected anymore." AOL's been purposely letting all of their dial-up numbers go silent for years now. The only ones they keep up are ones in areas without high speed (where the Telco's won't turn them on.)

mike black
07-03-2008, 05:10 PM
http://news.cnet.com/AOL-hanging-up-on-dial-up-customers/2100-1025_3-6043910.html

This is dated 2006. The number of dial ups have to be very small at this point.

That's really old. And it's only people who have AOL and a broadband connection.

I'd probably place the number of dial-up users around 6 mil or so.

mike black
07-03-2008, 05:12 PM
That's crazy. Dial-up isn't even available anymore in Korea. I just assumed it had disappeared in the US too, but I guess not.

R

The Telecoms are refusing to turn a lot of their lines on in certain areas. I'd wager around 90% of the country has broadband lines (of some kind) in the ground.

Why do you think Google has all of that "Dark Fibre"?

Foolish Mortal
07-03-2008, 05:54 PM
Yeah, I noticed that when I first moved here. Stuff was (and is) way faster. But dial-up was already gone when I moved here 4 years ago. The US is slooooooow.

R
The U.S. is a hell of a lot bigger, and has a lot more infrastructure to replace. Not to mention different states and counties have their own contracts with different companies to do the work which requires a lot of cooperation between the different regions and companies which tends not to move very fast.

Jason California
07-03-2008, 06:05 PM
The U.S. is a hell of a lot bigger, and has a lot more infrastructure to replace. Not to mention different states and counties have their own contracts with different companies to do the work which requires a lot of cooperation between the different regions and companies which tends not to move very fast.


You can also add to that the fact that technology is not always the same across the board. Look at cell phones. While most countries use one standard we have been developing 2 independent technologies with GSM and CDMA. So advances are getting split in half there. Luckily Verizon will be moving towards GSM with their next generation bringing the US more in line with the rest of the world.

Foolish Mortal
07-03-2008, 06:11 PM
You can also add to that the fact that technology is not always the same across the board. Look at cell phones. While most countries use one standard we have been developing 2 independent technologies with GSM and CDMA. So advances are getting split in half there. Luckily Verizon will be moving towards GSM with their next generation bringing the US more in line with the rest of the world.
No kidding. Look how many years it took before everyone could agree on one Digital Broadcast standard.

Amos Moses
07-03-2008, 06:14 PM
It's kind of embarressing that the country that invented the internet is falling behind on this.

Jason California
07-03-2008, 06:16 PM
It's kind of embarressing that the country that invented the internet is falling behind on this.


The VCR was created in Colorado Springs. Those guy could not figure out a way to make it profitable so they sold it to the Japanese.

mike black
07-03-2008, 06:37 PM
It's kind of embarressing that the country that invented the internet is falling behind on this.

The country that invented the internet is also 26 times larger than the other nation mentioned by others in this thread.

Amos Moses
07-03-2008, 06:40 PM
The VCR was created in Colorado Springs. Those guy could not figure out a way to make it profitable so they sold it to the Japanese.

Wizards! All of them!


The country that invented the internet is also 26 times larger than the other nation mentioned by others in this thread.

True. I just hate to see us being beaten at a game we invented.

costello
07-03-2008, 06:58 PM
Good.

Taxman
07-03-2008, 07:16 PM
I can understand not wanting to pay extra for broadband, but the 20% who said they just don't want it, well that just baffles me.Their internet use must be extremely minimal, that is all I can figure.

mike black
07-03-2008, 07:30 PM
True. I just hate to see us being beaten at a game we invented.

Once Korea has lain 26 separate lines to each and every home within it's borders, then I'll concede a loss.

Boris the Blade
07-03-2008, 08:15 PM
Do you know the shenanigans your kids could get up to if they had broadband? At least when it takes twenty minutes to download a titty picture, you have a better chance of busting your kids looking at porno.

Shepherd
07-04-2008, 12:01 AM
The country that invented the internet is also 26 times larger than the other nation mentioned by others in this thread.

I'll give you that the US is quite a bit larger than Korea, and I understand that that's one of the reasons for the fall behind, BUT I definitely don't think it's the only reason. While the US might be larger, it also has a much larger economy, so size is hardly an excuse. That coupled with the fact that the US now isn't where Korea was when I first came here 4 years ago, I think, more than makes up for the size disparity.

I think the reality of the situation is also due to the fact that:

1) Koreans in general are just far more interested in getting new technologies implemented right away than Americans are, and they are willing to pay for that implementation.

2) Koreans have a more vested interest in doing so: Their economy is very technology based, so tech must be new in order to stay ahead of the curve.

As I said, of course size plays a part, and I'm not denying that. I'm just saying that there are definitely other things at work here too.

R

mike black
07-04-2008, 07:05 AM
I'll give you that the US is quite a bit larger than Korea, and I understand that that's one of the reasons for the fall behind, BUT I definitely don't think it's the only reason. While the US might be larger, it also has a much larger economy, so size is hardly an excuse. That coupled with the fact that the US now isn't where Korea was when I first came here 4 years ago, I think, more than makes up for the size disparity.

I think the reality of the situation is also due to the fact that:

1) Koreans in general are just far more interested in getting new technologies implemented right away than Americans are, and they are willing to pay for that implementation.

2) Koreans have a more vested interest in doing so: Their economy is very technology based, so tech must be new in order to stay ahead of the curve.

As I said, of course size plays a part, and I'm not denying that. I'm just saying that there are definitely other things at work here too.

R

Economy goes far, yeah. But it still takes a while to lay lines across 3.7 million sq miles.