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Nick Hale
06-27-2008, 02:52 PM
I've been wanting to write something like this for a while, so here we go. I probably won't have time to finish in the next 10 minutes, but I'm going to post tips here as I think of them and as I get calls from stupid people.

These aren't in any particular order but here we go:

Tip One

If you buy a product that has a warranty, either read the warranty or keep a copy of your sales receipt. If the warranty doesn't state that you'll need a copy of the receipt or a proof of purchase then fine, throw it away. But if you toss this don't call 4 years into your warranty and then act shocked that you would be expected to keep this... We need proof that you bought it from someone authorized to sell it.

Most warranties are non-transferable and it says it in the warranty agreement, a receipt is required to proove that you are the original purchaser. It also can be required to proove that the product you want replaced isn't stolen.

The warranty on the product my company works for is great, probably one of the best in the business, but if you can't produce a receipt or some form of proof of purchase there's not alot we can do to help you.

Tip Two:

Don't call in with a question, then talk for 5 minutes straight not letting your CSR answer you. For one they will tune you out, I do it all the time, I don't mean to, but it's a natural response. Once you've asked a question pause, let the CSR respond, then go to your next question. You would be surprised how many people fail to grasp this simple concept. In a normal 60 call day I'll have at least 10 people who do this. A good CSR won't cut you off and will let you talk until you are done, so doing this just takes up more of your own time.

Unless the person is new with the company or that helpdesk, normally you won't need to go over every tiny detail, just hit the broad issue and ask your question. Let the CSR ask probing questions so they get what they need if they need more info, that's our job.

Also, if you start doing this and you get cut off by the CSR, don't get mad. The only time I will cut a customer off is if they continuosly do this and I've got calls in queue waiting to be answered, its to help other customers get their questions answered as well.

More to come later. If any other CSRs on the board want to contribute feel free. :)

smm EBob
06-27-2008, 03:03 PM
Tip #534 - dont kill the messenger. the csr is only doing what the company wants him to do. if the company doesnt allow you to get a credit for you're 8th late fee, dont yell at the csr for not giving it to you. just pay your fuckin bill on time

Genius J
06-27-2008, 03:04 PM
A good CSR won't cut you off and will let you talk until you are done, so doing this just takes up more of your own time.

Unless the person is new with the company or that helpdesk, normally you won't need to go over every tiny detail, just hit the broad issue and ask your question. Let the CSR ask probing questions so they get what they need if they need more info, that's our job.
I hate to burst your bubble of pride, but most call center reps don't do this well at all. Maybe your group is the exception, but it's certainly not the norm.

Nick Hale
06-27-2008, 03:10 PM
Top #534 - dont kill the messenger. the csr is only doing what the company wants him to do. if the company doesnt allow you to get a credit for you're 8th late fee, dont yell at the csr for not giving it to you. just pay your fuckin bill on time

Yeah, I gotta agree with this one.

And that leads directly into Nick's Tip #3:

Don't cuss at your CSR. Now as some of you know, I tend to cuss like a fuckin' sailor, but I'll happily hang up on you if you begin cussing at me. How would you like it if someone came up to you at your job and started cussing at you? Probably not alot, especially if it was over something that you don't have any say in.

My normal rule is you get one warning if you are yelling or cursing at me, I'll ask you politely to stop, if you don't I'll drop your call and send an email out to all of my colleagues. The email will provide your name and account info if I have it, that I've just hung up on you and you will probably be calling back, and why I hung up on you.

Nick Hale
06-27-2008, 03:13 PM
I hate to burst your bubble of pride, but most call center reps don't do this well at all. Maybe your group is the exception, but it's certainly not the norm.

No problem, I realize that its not the norm at all, though it is actually more common than alot of people think. And yeah, the group I work with has some people that cut customers off all the time and it drives me nuts.

Matt Jay
06-27-2008, 03:16 PM
I did high volume customer service for two weeks before I quit. Only job I ever quit because I couldn't handle it. I salute you people.

Nick Hale
06-27-2008, 03:20 PM
I did high volume customer service for two weeks before I quit. Only job I ever quit because I couldn't handle it. I salute you people.

Heh, I've been doing it for three and a half years now. I'm actually a trainer at the new place now... sorta... I'm helping to develop a training program for the companies customer service side since we've never had an official one. I was also a trainer for my project at the last job.

Being a Customer Service person isn't a job for everyone, unfortunately as Genius J's post points out, alot of people who are in the field shouldn't be here. There are people in my own department that I sometimes want to ask "Are you sure you should be working here in customer service?"

I hope to help "fix" these people, I know I have no hope. :surrend:

Quick edit:

I'll admit, there are soul crushing days where I have a crapload of bad customers and issues I can't resolve that I wonder why the hell I work here.

MaccLad
06-27-2008, 03:21 PM
Don't think saying "Let me speak to your supervisor" will intimidate people into agreeing to your demands.

and

You catch more flies with honey than vinegar! So don't be rude first thing!

Nick Hale
06-27-2008, 03:28 PM
Going to change how I do these and include a Customer section and a CSR section of the tip.

Tip Four - Transfers:

Customers-
Don't get mad at me because I have to transfer you or ask you to call another department or company. Unfortunately there is no such thing as an ultimate helpdesk to answer every single question, for every company ever. Until this happens, you will find times where you need to be transferred. If you call me about issues with your financing, I can't help you, don't refuse to talk to the finance company just because you don't want to "waste your time making another call." It's not going to get you any help, take the transfer or the number and give them a call, they'll be able to help you.

CSRs -
Don't transfer for no good reason. If you can help the customer, help them without a transfer. Before you transfer make sure you explain to them why you have to transfer them and that they are being transferred.

A large portion of customer's that I've spoke to who get hostile about transfers do so because they have been transferred for no good reason too many times in the past. My motto for all things Customer Service is, help them the first time and they don't call back screaming at you.

Nick Hale
06-27-2008, 03:30 PM
Don't think saying "Let me speak to your supervisor" will intimidate people into agreeing to your demands.

and

You catch more flies with honey than vinegar! So don't be rude first thing!

Yeah I'm saving up my "Let me speak to your supervisor," tip. Sometimes its the best thing to do, sometimes you are just wasting your time as well as the supervisors and noone wins.

MaccLad
06-27-2008, 03:34 PM
it's funny reading this while I'm on a Swahili translator call. Bye bye handle time.

Genius J
06-27-2008, 03:39 PM
I had to call a really shitty customer service line today for my credit card. The first thing I did when the CSR answered the phone was to apologize for the frustration I was about to unleash. Then I explained my problem very irritably, and when I was done I apologized again and said "I know it's not your fault, but I just want you to understand my frustration level, it's not directed at you individually but moreso at your department."

That sometimes helps. But not always. Not if you're calling a room full of fuckwits.

Gunter
06-27-2008, 03:40 PM
Don't think saying "Let me speak to your supervisor" will intimidate people into agreeing to your demands.

and

You catch more flies with honey than vinegar! So don't be rude first thing!

Exactly.

If you don't feel the CSR can do what you're asking, explain that to them. Tell them that you realize that they're being as helpful as they can, but you feel the need to take it to a higher level.

Don't yell, remain calm. But be firm.

MaccLad
06-27-2008, 03:46 PM
Just don't ask for a supervisor without at least explaining the situation first. The csr may be able to solve things easily and my supervisor,at least, would say "find out what they want" before they would speak to them anyway.

Nick Hale
06-27-2008, 03:48 PM
Here are my tips to CSRs for # 1-3

1: Theres not alot I can tell you here, good luck with these people. Maintain your calm and stay firm to the companies policy, this one will vary from helpdesk to helpdesk though.

2: Be patient with your customer, let them talk. If they won't stop talking and it's definitely going on too long, cut them off but do it politely. If they get angry maintain your control of the situation but don't loose your cool. Stay polite and helpful.

If the customer cuts you off mid sentence after doing this however and begins doing it again my favorite thing to do is to remain quiet for a few seconds after they stop talking. The main thing this does is let's you know they are done. I've noticed it does have the after effect of sometimes having the customer state "Are you still there" and/or acts as a non-verbal clue to them that its your turn to talk now. I don't get why it works, it just does.

3: Check with your supervisors on how you can and cannot handle these calls, helpdesks will vary on rules for this. The two helpdesks I've worked thus far have both had a "Give them a warning then drop them" rule. But some companies make you take it, I'd reccomend finding another job if you are at one of these, as you shouldn't have to put up with that. :)

Either way though, remember the main rule for handling customers, always remain calm, don't get worked up and stay polite. Sometimes just doing this will cool the customer down. I also find letting the customer vent sometimes helps. One thing that only works part of the time is advising the customer that its not your fault that the rules are this way. Sometimes that just serves to make them more mad.

Nick Hale
06-27-2008, 04:00 PM
I had to call a really shitty customer service line today for my credit card. The first thing I did when the CSR answered the phone was to apologize for the frustration I was about to unleash. Then I explained my problem very irritably, and when I was done I apologized again and said "I know it's not your fault, but I just want you to understand my frustration level, it's not directed at you individually but moreso at your department."

That sometimes helps. But not always. Not if you're calling a room full of fuckwits.

I wish every frustrated customer would do that. You handled that perfectly. I've done the exact same thing, sometimes there's just so much you can deal with.

Nick Hale
06-27-2008, 04:01 PM
Just don't ask for a supervisor without at least explaining the situation first. The csr may be able to solve things easily and my supervisor,at least, would say "find out what they want" before they would speak to them anyway.

You're covering most of my points for my supervisor tip already... :)

Doug O
06-27-2008, 04:11 PM
I called Wageworks today, they do our pre-tax health credit card, and I was cranky but very nice. It was obvious I was frustrated with myself for not being able to find 2 of 8 receipts, but I was asking pointedly, "I thought you were using your merchant codes so I wouldn't have to save all receipts?"

She was a little on edge like she was ready for me to flip out, but she was real good - had to put me on hold one time to have somebody help review it.

So my tip is follow Patrick Swayze's advice, whatever you're doing, be nice.

Genius J
06-27-2008, 04:12 PM
Until it's time to not be nice!

Doug O
06-27-2008, 04:21 PM
Thanks dude.

smm EBob
06-27-2008, 04:43 PM
Just don't ask for a supervisor without at least explaining the situation first. The csr may be able to solve things easily and my supervisor,at least, would say "find out what they want" before they would speak to them anyway.

sometimes customers will say "i dont wanna have to repeat myself, so just put the supervisor on" in which i reply "let me know what the problem is and i gauruntee you wont have to repeat yourself. if its a situation im unable to handle, i will explain the situation to the supervisor myself"

MaccLad
06-27-2008, 05:23 PM
Sometimes when dealing with a rude customer (one that isnt particularly bright) I want to say-"Sir-I should inform you of the fact that I've documented your account that your'e a rude beligerent fuckhead and now whenever you call the rep you're speaking with will be aware of it. I've also noted that you're a peepeepoopoo head. And I've added some fees that you will see on your next statement. Have a good day"

Flonk
06-28-2008, 10:01 AM
I'm a restaurant manager, so I have to deal with irate customers all the time. So I sympathize with you, I really do. And, just due to my nature, I try to not call with any trival problems. That said...


A while back I was having some computer issues. It's on the board somewhere if you feel like searching it out. I wouldn't recomend it. Anyways, three months into the ordeal I got so frustrated with the customer service I started hitting random buttons on my phone, in the hopes that I would find somebody, anybody that could help me. I somehow accidentaly transfered myself out of India and into America. The guy was great, he talked me down, and by the end of the week I had a brand new computer for my troubles. Just wanted to add a good customer service story, before this becomes a bitching thread.

Leicester Dan
06-28-2008, 12:08 PM
Tip Four - Transfers:

Customers-
Don't get mad at me because I have to transfer you or ask you to call another department or company.


Especially if the first thing that you say is "I hope you can help me because I've been waiting ages for your accounts department", when you've just answered the phone "Technical support."

If you've tried to call a different extension because you don't like the amount of time that you're waiting when you try the correct extension then don't be surprised that we'll not be able to help.

We'll then just stick you in the correct queue anyway so you'll be queueing to talk to a department that cannot help you and then queueing for as long as you would have had to anyway in the correct queue.

HoneyDippinDan
06-28-2008, 06:21 PM
Don't think saying "Let me speak to your supervisor" will intimidate people into agreeing to your demands.

and

You catch more flies with honey than vinegar! So don't be rude first thing!

I can't stress the last one enough.

Also, kindly ban the phrase "you people" from your vocabulary. There's absolutely no way to say this phrase and not come off as being rude.

Other things customers these days don't seem to be aware of:

People that work at companies are not a single entity. You are not talking to the Borg. Just because you talked to John in tech support does not mean Sam in billing know that your problem is when you speak to him a month later.

Computers aren't magic nor do they make the person operating them psychic. Getting upset with the CSR and telling them look at their computer because information about your call should magically appear there and ohmygosh it's too much trouble to tell that person who you are and your account info so that can actually follow along with your request is asinine. Also, there is no secret government agency that informs all your creditors and anyone you've done business with when you have moved.

Now I won't say all CSR's are geniuses, but they aren't necessarily total morons either. Trust me, they are rolling their eyes about your story on how "some guy" told you it wasn't necessary to pay your bill any more and telling me that you have never paid late when I am staring at your account history and can see that your rarely pay on time is more the case doesn't win you favors.

"The customer is always right" is not a law. It was an advertising slogan that people without common sense adopted. Whenever I hear this phrase, what I hear is "I have no valid arguments for why my demands are reasonable".

Businesses exist to make a profit so they can pay their workers and the people who invest money in them. The idea of a company trying to make money off the products and services they provide should not come as a shock. If this does come as shocking, please head back to your local high school and take Econ 101 again.

The fact you are choosing to do something retarded is not the CSR's fault. Please refrain from complaining that your are calling from your car while heading down the freeway and how what you are doing is dangerous. If you know you are doing something stupid, then stop doing it.

You are not a special and unique snowflake. Your reasoning as to why you feel you are exempt from the company's policies has probably been stated by others hundreds of thousands of times before.

This being said, I'd like to ask fellow CSRs to stop doing all the same stupid shit your customers do. The rewards program I work for is used internally in my company. As a whole, the worst group of "customers" I have to deal with are people that work for my company. I'm continually shocked at the number that are rude and obnoxious, feel that working for the company makes them exempt from the policies, call unprepared without their account information and complain about shit they are choosing to do like "I'm calling on my break and this call is going to make me late." Call when you are not in a hurry, dipshit! Simple. Fucking. Solution.

On the subject of not interrupting customers when they are talking:

There are times when I feel it is necessary to interrupt. If you, the customer, cannot stay on subject, I will interrupt you as politely as possible. While I'm sure the weather in your area is nice and your grand kids are the greatest, unless you can prove how these things related to your credit card bill I don't want to hear it and you are making other customer wait while you tell me these things.

Also, if we are three minutes into the call and all you have done is scream platitudes (THIS IS THE WORST SERVICE EVER!!!! THIS IS THE WORST THING TO HAPPEN TO ME IN MY LIFE!!!!! RAAAARRRRRGGGGHHHHH!!!) and have yet to even give a hint as to why you are calling, I will interrupt you. There's blowing off steam and then there is just being plain obnoxious. Learn to know the difference please.

EDIT: I forgot a huge tip. If you have a question, be prepared to listen to the answer. I can't tell you how many times a day I talk to someone that makes it blatantly obvious that they aren't bothering to listen to a word I am saying. You are wasting everyone's time when you do this, including your own.

Ryan_ZOOM_Turner
06-28-2008, 09:02 PM
Please don't try and convert me over the phone, it won't work.

Ryan_ZOOM_Turner
06-28-2008, 09:15 PM
Also when it comes to asking for a bill credit, don't tell me that I have to credit your account before I do research and find out if a bill credit is actually due.

Leicester Dan
06-29-2008, 02:53 AM
I will admit if a mistake has been made and try to rectify it for you but please don't try and get me to admit that my company procedures are stupid.

We may both know that it is true but my company pay me and you don't so I'm gonna stick with my company on this one and not actually admit on a recorded call that they have in fact made this mistake a million times before due to some crappy system that they use.

"But you agree with me, right? It would be better to do it this way right?" - It's just not going to happen so please stop trying to get me to say it.

Mylazycat
06-29-2008, 04:26 AM
I will admit if a mistake has been made and try to rectify it for you but please don't try and get me to admit that my company procedures are stupid.

We may both know that it is true but my company pay me and you don't so I'm gonna stick with my company on this one and not actually admit on a recorded call that they have in fact made this mistake a million times before due to some crappy system that they use.

"But you agree with me, right? It would be better to do it this way right?" - It's just not going to happen so please stop trying to get me to say it.


Wow, this is so true. It's amazing how many times I hear this.

ChuckMcButcalf
06-29-2008, 04:59 PM
Here are my tips to CSRs for # 1-3

1: Theres not alot I can tell you here, good luck with these people. Maintain your calm and stay firm to the companies policy, this one will vary from helpdesk to helpdesk though.

2: Be patient with your customer, let them talk. If they won't stop talking and it's definitely going on too long, cut them off but do it politely. If they get angry maintain your control of the situation but don't loose your cool. Stay polite and helpful.

If the customer cuts you off mid sentence after doing this however and begins doing it again my favorite thing to do is to remain quiet for a few seconds after they stop talking. The main thing this does is let's you know they are done. I've noticed it does have the after effect of sometimes having the customer state "Are you still there" and/or acts as a non-verbal clue to them that its your turn to talk now. I don't get why it works, it just does.

3: Check with your supervisors on how you can and cannot handle these calls, helpdesks will vary on rules for this. The two helpdesks I've worked thus far have both had a "Give them a warning then drop them" rule. But some companies make you take it, I'd reccomend finding another job if you are at one of these, as you shouldn't have to put up with that. :)

Either way though, remember the main rule for handling customers, always remain calm, don't get worked up and stay polite. Sometimes just doing this will cool the customer down. I also find letting the customer vent sometimes helps. One thing that only works part of the time is advising the customer that its not your fault that the rules are this way. Sometimes that just serves to make them more mad.

Dude, you are so right on all off this. Getting pissy with the customer is bound to make stuff worse, and if you remain understanding, 9 times out of 10, you'll calm them down and end the call on a positive note.

And I know this was mentioned before, but for Christ's sake, at least work with the customer before getting your supervisor to take the call. I work both during the week and on the weekend for a catalog company call center (hint: we sell Beef Logs and Petis Fours). On the weekend, I'm there as a supervisor. I can't tell you how many times reps (mostly teenage workers who don't give a fuck) come up to me asking to take a sup call and they have NO idea why the customer called in. UGH. Do your job!

Nick Hale
06-29-2008, 05:20 PM
Dude, you are so right on all off this. Getting pissy with the customer is bound to make stuff worse, and if you remain understanding, 9 times out of 10, you'll calm them down and end the call on a positive note.

And I know this was mentioned before, but for Christ's sake, at least work with the customer before getting your supervisor to take the call. I work both during the week and on the weekend for a catalog company call center (hint: we sell Beef Logs and Petis Fours). On the weekend, I'm there as a supervisor. I can't tell you how many times reps (mostly teenage workers who don't give a fuck) come up to me asking to take a sup call and they have NO idea why the customer called in. UGH. Do your job!

Busy weekend of no sleeping so I haven't had time to update here... but yeah I agree with you on that. Same goes for any transfers, see if you can help the customer first before you transfer them into my voice mail or directly to me, 9 out of 10 times its something any CSR can handle and the customer just wants to talk to the same person because they don't know any better.

I was also just reminded... When you hear "Your call may be recorded," it probably is, I've yet to hear of a company that doesn't record every single call that comes in, both companies I've worked for record every single call. So don't say anything you don't want recorded, this goes for CSRs and Customers both. Always assume the call is being recorded.

ChuckMcButcalf
06-29-2008, 05:26 PM
Busy weekend of no sleeping so I haven't had time to update here... but yeah I agree with you on that. Same goes for any transfers, see if you can help the customer first before you transfer them into my voice mail or directly to me, 9 out of 10 times its something any CSR can handle and the customer just wants to talk to the same person because they don't know any better.

I was also just reminded... When you hear "Your call may be recorded," it probably is, I've yet to hear of a company that doesn't record every single call that comes in, both companies I've worked for record every single call. So don't say anything you don't want recorded, this goes for CSRs and Customers both. Always assume the call is being recorded.

Exactly. It always amazes me to hear the stupid shit people say on the phone. Some times its because they don't know what they're saying is wrong, but a lot of times they just make shit up as they go along. We have to follow up with reps if they get a bad monitor score and listen to a few calls. It's painful to listen to sometimes in all honesty.

Nick Hale
06-29-2008, 05:41 PM
Exactly. It always amazes me to hear the stupid shit people say on the phone. Some times its because they don't know what they're saying is wrong, but a lot of times they just make shit up as they go along. We have to follow up with reps if they get a bad monitor score and listen to a few calls. It's painful to listen to sometimes in all honesty.

I have heard some calls though that are pure comedy gold.

ChuckMcButcalf
06-29-2008, 05:44 PM
I have heard some calls though that are pure comedy gold.

Well now I'm curious, sir.

Mylazycat
06-29-2008, 06:55 PM
Well now I'm curious, sir.

Me, too, and I work in the field.

HoneyDippinDan
06-29-2008, 09:33 PM
Busy weekend of no sleeping so I haven't had time to update here... but yeah I agree with you on that. Same goes for any transfers, see if you can help the customer first before you transfer them into my voice mail or directly to me, 9 out of 10 times its something any CSR can handle and the customer just wants to talk to the same person because they don't know any better.

I was also just reminded... When you hear "Your call may be recorded," it probably is, I've yet to hear of a company that doesn't record every single call that comes in, both companies I've worked for record every single call. So don't say anything you don't want recorded, this goes for CSRs and Customers both. Always assume the call is being recorded.

At my first call center, only three or four calls were recorded every day, although we did have an "emergency" button on our phone in case the customer wanted to make any threats. At my current call center, my call type get about half a dozen calls recorded a day. In regular customer service, all calls are recorded unless the customer asks us to not record the call. Then, the majority get erased a month later, unless the rep sold the customer something, then the call gets saved forever.

I did once hear of a recording saving a CSR's job once. Some jackass and his lawyer threatened to sue us, claiming that the rep canceled the man's credit card account without his permission. Our lawyers sent his lawyer a copy of the call where the customer clearly asked to have his account closed, and had the legal verbatim read off to him.

I totally wish I had access to those recording. I'd love to send customers recording of our calls, complete with commentary from me pointing out the stupid things they said, the times they contradicted themselves, and the ones where they are generally proving what assholes they could be. Actually, with the last type, I'd love to send copies to them, their friends, and their neighbors.

Brad N.
06-29-2008, 09:50 PM
Going to change how I do these and include a Customer section and a CSR section of the tip.

Tip Four - Transfers:

Customers-
Don't get mad at me because I have to transfer you or ask you to call another department or company. Unfortunately there is no such thing as an ultimate helpdesk to answer every single question, for every company ever. Until this happens, you will find times where you need to be transferred. If you call me about issues with your financing, I can't help you, don't refuse to talk to the finance company just because you don't want to "waste your time making another call." It's not going to get you any help, take the transfer or the number and give them a call, they'll be able to help you.

CSRs -
Don't transfer for no good reason. If you can help the customer, help them without a transfer. Before you transfer make sure you explain to them why you have to transfer them and that they are being transferred.

A large portion of customer's that I've spoke to who get hostile about transfers do so because they have been transferred for no good reason too many times in the past. My motto for all things Customer Service is, help them the first time and they don't call back screaming at you.

I agree. I'm as polite as a peach on the phone and having worked some CSR work in my younger days I understand the pain in the ass customers can be so I TRY very hard to be direct and kind when I have an issue. That said I have never dealt with worse CSR's than Sprint. Just awful. One day I honestly spent 1.5 hours total on the phone and 7 transfers before finally having my problem solved. I had kept getting my cell phone shut off when the bill was only "late" by a week even though it was late due to their fuckup. They kept forgetting to credit my account $150 that was owed to me for resinging a new contract and each time calling they had said it was immediately credited, then my phone was shut off and I'd call and find out it wasn't. This happened 4 times. Then after my awful 1.5 hour day they finally transferred me to a guy who got it right.

Nick Hale
06-30-2008, 05:22 AM
That said I have never dealt with worse CSR's than Sprint. Just awful.

The previous place I worked had Sprint Blackberry support... I can tell you now that I understand why, half the center was that one project and their turnover rate probably averaged 2-4 weeks at best. Alot of times people would leave right after training. The company I worked for would literally hire anyone with a pulse that could answer a phone and shove them over there. People who were good normally got moved to other projects.

Also I know for a fact that Sprint's support is broken up amongst at least 2 companies, because I have friends at my current job that came from another company and they supported Sprint as well.


At my first call center, only three or four calls were recorded every day, although we did have an "emergency" button on our phone in case the customer wanted to make any threats.

Yeah the first place I worked was the same way, however that really just flagged the call. I'd be surprised if they didn't have every call recorded somewhere, probably just not where they were easily accessable and its for the reason you mentioned. The calls are recorded to protect the customer and the CSR more than anything, the first place I worked recorded every call, but only 2-4 a day could be accessed by Quality to monitor. The rest were kept on a server to protect the company.


Well now I'm curious, sir.

Heh, I'll share some later, I've got some entertaining ones. I actually have an audio recording of a call that happened before I started working there.

Leicester Dan
06-30-2008, 06:41 AM
When you hear "Your call may be recorded," it probably is

In regards to calls being recorded. If you are a customer, please ensure that you do not try to blag us by saying that someone else has told you something different.

The amount of times someone on the phone has said "Well Phil told me that I would get a full refund and 20 in vouchers" or some other complete rubbish when it is blatantly not true, just because they are speaking to someone new to their complaint.

I absolutely loved replying to these types of issues with a transcript of the original call and an "as you can clearly see, Phil did not promise you that at all".

It just seriously undermines your credability.

As a customer, ensure that you keep a record of when you made your calls, who you spoke to (including surname if you can get it) and what was said. I have called companies up before only to find that they have no record of my previous call. If you start to spout off exactly who you spoke to and when they tend to suddenly perk up a lot more than if the two of you go off on a "I called on..." and "well there's no record of that..." rant.

cPol
06-30-2008, 07:00 AM
I have never dealt with worse CSR's than Sprint. Just awful. One day I honestly spent 1.5 hours total on the phone and 7 transfers before finally having my problem solved. I had kept getting my cell phone shut off when the bill was only "late" by a week even though it was late due to their fuckup. They kept forgetting to credit my account $150 that was owed to me for resinging a new contract and each time calling they had said it was immediately credited, then my phone was shut off and I'd call and find out it wasn't. This happened 4 times. Then after my awful 1.5 hour day they finally transferred me to a guy who got it right.

My God, it's like reading a post about my past...

I have two Nextel phones that I upgraded to Sprint phones (after Sprint bought Nextel). Almost immediately after getting the Sprint phones, I decided I wanted to go back to my old Nextels. I called Sprint. They could help, because I was still technically a Nextel customer. I called Nextel. They couldn't help, because I was trying to return a Sprint product. I eventually had to find someone at Sprint who would transfer me to a special Sprint/Nextel area which was specifically formed for Nextel customers who upgraded to Sprint. I returned the items and eventually got a bill for $1,000 for the full purchase price of the phones that I sent back a month prior.

Then began another round of calling Sprint, Nextel and Sprint/Nextel where I was finally told to just pay my normal monthly charges, and they'd credit me the purchase price of the phones.

It took about six months to get it all straightened out, with my cell service being shut off twice for "non-payment" and the returned phones getting lost, each instance sparking off another round of calls.

Asshats.

danlomb
06-30-2008, 07:28 AM
Tip Two:

Don't call in with a question, then talk for 5 minutes straight not letting your CSR answer you. For one they will tune you out, I do it all the time, I don't mean to, but it's a natural response. Once you've asked a question pause, let the CSR respond, then go to your next question. You would be surprised how many people fail to grasp this simple concept. In a normal 60 call day I'll have at least 10 people who do this. A good CSR won't cut you off and will let you talk until you are done, so doing this just takes up more of your own time.


THANK you.

Whenever I'm playing supervisor, and have to take an escalated call from a CSR that the customer is either fed up with, or feels that somehow a manager can warp space and time for them, this always happens.
Of course, it occurs when I'M the CSR, and MY manager is the recipient.

What'll happen is, the CSR will explain to me the situation in detail, and then I'll go and READ the situation in even more detail from the notes on the account.

So when I answer the call, and say "G'day, sorry for keeping you, etc. etc., now I've heard all about the situation, and--", FOR SOME REASON, customers think that's the cue to repeat every goddamn thing.

And while they do, my brain completely shuts down.

Hear us out first, okay? Then do your thing.

Arion
06-30-2008, 07:50 AM
I hate to burst your bubble of pride, but most call center reps don't do this well at all. Maybe your group is the exception, but it's certainly not the norm.

You are probably right.

Nick Hale
07-02-2008, 09:59 AM
Tip 5:

Customers:

Be prepared, have pen and paper handy and ready to go even if you aren't sure that you'll need it. I don't know how many times I've had a customer call about how to file a warranty claim and then after I tell them everything they need to do they go "Oh, wait let me get a pen and paper," then I have to repeat myself. This wastes both the CSRs time and your own time, if you call prepared things run much faster.

By extension of this, don't call while you are driving or otherwise can't take a note if need be.

CSRs:

This goes for you too, I myself have had to hunt for pen's in the past but normally because I've dropped it on the floor or something of that nature. If you don't have a pen or paper handy ask a supervisor who you need to contact to get those.

copypastepuke
07-02-2008, 10:02 AM
60 calls a day? woah you are outshining me by far. average call length?

Nick Hale
07-02-2008, 10:17 AM
60 calls a day? woah you are outshining me by far. average call length?

Here are my stats for the week of the 14th... its the last set i've got.

Nick Hale
CPH 7.32
ATT 0:02:56
AHLT 0:00:08
AACWT 0:00:53
AHT 0:03:58

Thats Calls Per Hour (CPH), Average Talk Time (ATT), Average Hold Time (AHLT), Average After Call Work Time (AACWT) and Average Handle Time (AHT).