PDA

View Full Version : Question For Writers



Kedd
06-10-2008, 07:50 AM
Ever have trouble connecting scenes? I mean; Do you ever find it difficult to transition from one scene to a next(especially if you've written them out of order as I sometimes do). what do you do when/if this happens.

Ryudo
06-10-2008, 07:50 AM
Sometimes, random, sudden jumps are good.

James Patrick
06-10-2008, 07:51 AM
structure, structure, structure

NeverWanderer
06-10-2008, 07:54 AM
Are you just talking about segues, or knowing when to end one scene and begin another, or...?

Ben
06-10-2008, 07:55 AM
Just insert a funny transitional thing between scenes where a funky poodle is trying to get laid.

RickLM
06-10-2008, 07:56 AM
If your talking about novels, a scene change within a chapter can look abrupt. But if you start a new chapter with an entirely new scene, it seems more natural. Then again, that may not apply to your medium.

NickT
06-10-2008, 07:59 AM
Yes, and I racked my brains over it for ages. Then I just did a sudden jump and made a joke about it :)

James Patrick
06-10-2008, 07:59 AM
Ever have trouble connecting scenes? I mean; Do you ever find it difficult to transition from one scene to a next(especially if you've written them out of order as I sometimes do). what do you do when/if this happens.

yeah, it's important to define what you're talking about. do your scenes not make sense as sequence or are is it just a simple transition thing? If it's a simple transition thing, try to punch out or, um, transition. But if you're scenes are working one after the other as a whole, see my above post and it's something much more difficult to explain or tackle.

Akira
06-10-2008, 08:06 AM
Yeah, that's one of my biggest problems. I'm trying to get better at it though. Sometimes it works if you can find a connection between the way the first scene and the next starts. You can point out the parallels.

Ashwin Pande
06-10-2008, 08:14 AM
I never write scenes out of order. If I come up with an idea for a scene or a dialog exchange I put it down in a text file under NOTES. Then I break down the script into beats. Put the scenes in order according to the NOTES and the way I want to tell the story. Then I actually write the script.

I should note that I'm lazy and a huge procrastinator so I'm not as disciplined as the above comes off.

Speaking of which I shall now close Firefox and get back to work before I'm further drawn in by my hatred of Juno!

WinstonWolf
06-10-2008, 08:29 AM
All the time. That's not an uncommon problem.

c. page
06-10-2008, 08:31 AM
that's actually something that i've never had a problem with. i can write transitions pretty well.

NeverWanderer
06-10-2008, 08:36 AM
I never write scenes out of order. If I come up with an idea for a scene or a dialog exchange I put it down in a text file under NOTES. Then I break down the script into beats. Put the scenes in order according to the NOTES and the way I want to tell the story. Then I actually write the script.

I should note that I'm lazy and a huge procrastinator so I'm not as disciplined as the above comes off.

Speaking of which I shall now close Firefox and get back to work before I'm further drawn in by my hatred of Juno!

Sometimes I think you just need a really big hug...


I actually work much the same way. I just start listing different scene ideas with bullet points, and then as they jump around, I start to create a loose timeline or order of events.

For transitions in general, though, I've always been a fan of the overlapping dialogue/caption.

Kedd
06-10-2008, 08:39 AM
Are you just talking about segues, or knowing when to end one scene and begin another, or...?
Mostly it's that the scenes go on for too long. It's like having a conversation that suddenly hits a lull and you just don't know how to end it.



yeah, it's important to define what you're talking about. do your scenes not make sense as sequence or are is it just a simple transition thing? If it's a simple transition thing, try to punch out or, um, transition. But if you're scenes are working one after the other as a whole, see my above post and it's something much more difficult to explain or tackle.

My issue is that I know what information needs to be expressed during a scene, and I know what scene needs(or at least that I want) to follow. But I'm having a hard time knowing the right time to cut from scene A to Scene B.
Ok, having just re-read what I've typed here in this post...I realize what I'm saying is starting to make no sense and I'm having Deja vu as well.
damn

James Patrick
06-10-2008, 08:42 AM
Sounds like it might be pacing, but it still may be your overall structure. You might want to try outlining eveything, which can sometimes help smooth out your story and distribute your information.

Kedd
06-10-2008, 08:43 AM
Sounds like it might be pacing, but it still may be your overall structure. You might want to try outlineing eveything, which can sometimes help smoothe out your story and distribute your information.

Yeah, outlining has always been a week point for me, but I've been trying to get better at. thanks all

NeverWanderer
06-10-2008, 08:47 AM
The best advice I've heard for that is to enter the scene late and leave early.

It's mostly used in screenwriting, but I think it's applicable to most situations.

(unless part of the point of the scene is the lead-in or fade-out)

Raphael J
06-10-2008, 08:50 AM
Mostly it's that the scenes go on for too long. It's like having a conversation that suddenly hits a lull and you just don't know how to end it.

My issue is that I know what information needs to be expressed during a scene, and I know what scene needs(or at least that I want) to follow. But I'm having a hard time knowing the right time to cut from scene A to Scene B.
Ok, having just re-read what I've typed here in this post...I realize what I'm saying is starting to make no sense and I'm having Deja vu as well.
damn

You always have the opportunity for rewrites, so try writing the scene. Indulge yourself as much as you'd like then, when you're done with the scene or with the entire story, go back and trim the fat. Sometimes I have a hard time coming up with the thesis of what I'm trying to get my characters to express and I find that afterwards, when I read exactly what I wrote, it helps me find what parts of the dialogue need to be refocused or changed altogether.

Kedd
06-10-2008, 09:07 AM
The best advice I've heard for that is to enter the scene late and leave early.

It's mostly used in screenwriting, but I think it's applicable to most situations.

(unless part of the point of the scene is the lead-in or fade-out)

The first part of that I've got pretty good. Leaving a scene early is hard as hell for me to do though

c. page
06-10-2008, 09:08 AM
Mostly it's that the scenes go on for too long. It's like having a conversation that suddenly hits a lull and you just don't know how to end it.




My issue is that I know what information needs to be expressed during a scene, and I know what scene needs(or at least that I want) to follow. But I'm having a hard time knowing the right time to cut from scene A to Scene B.
Ok, having just re-read what I've typed here in this post...I realize what I'm saying is starting to make no sense and I'm having Deja vu as well.
damn

is this a comic script? a screenplay?

NeverWanderer
06-10-2008, 09:28 AM
The first part of that I've got pretty good. Leaving a scene early is hard as hell for me to do though

...me too. :surrend:

I've always had a problem with sticking to that rule. I like seeing whole scenes, so it's difficult not to show them in my own writing.

One thing that I do to sort of help me in that direction is to analyze the scene, and find the point in the dialogue where the rest of the scene can be assumed.

For example: You've got a scene with two people talking on the phone, in which the main event is that one person gets an address from the other one. It's easy to write out the entire conversation (especially if you're strange like me and LOVE keeping incidental dialogue -- it just makes everything feel more authentic). BUT, when looking at that scene, it's obvious that the minute one person says, "Okay, I've got a pen. What's the address?" THAT's where you can cut the scene. The rest of it can just be assumed. He gets the address, hangs up. Even if there's lots of clever dialogue following it, the minute the one character gets that address, the rest of the scene is not needed -- it may be FUN... but it's not necessary.

That may seem like an obvious rule for most other writers, but for me, discovering it was a big part of my development.

Ashwin Pande
06-10-2008, 09:29 AM
Sometimes I think you just need a really big hug...

It's true.

:cry:

PhilipClark
06-10-2008, 09:31 AM
Just insert a funny transitional thing between scenes where a funky poodle is trying to get laid.

Funky Poodle would be an awesome band name.

Kedd
06-10-2008, 09:33 AM
is this a comic script? a screenplay?

It's my first serious attempt at a screenplay.
But it also applies to some long form prose work I'm noodling with

Ben
06-10-2008, 09:34 AM
It's my first attempt at a screenplayJust have a narrator come on and be like "Later that day" for every scene transition. Problem solved. Can I get a writer credit?

Ashwin Pande
06-10-2008, 09:35 AM
Just insert a funny transitional thing between scenes where a funky poodle is trying to get laid.

If only we could do something like the penis single frame shot like in Fight Club in comics.

I'd do it on every page.

NeverWanderer
06-10-2008, 09:36 AM
...or, y'know, just cut to the dog.

Kedd
06-10-2008, 09:39 AM
Just have a narrator come on and be like "Later that day" for every scene transition. Problem solved. Can I get a writer credit?

you can be my Ben Affleck