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Jonathan Callan
03-03-2008, 09:54 AM
I have a confession to make. As much as I love Brubaker's Criminal, I am frequently intimidated by the back-matter. There is so much discussion of movies I've never heard of, let alone seen. I have a good background in modern noir movies I suppose, but guys like Brubaker and Siuntres just blow me away with everything they know about the genre.

So here's an exercise. Do people want to recommend their top 5 favorite noir films and then I'll check out the ones that there seems to be a good consensus for?

Patton
03-03-2008, 10:00 AM
I just started getting into them recently and I have a few I like but my only favorite so far is

The Big Sleep

NickT
03-03-2008, 10:01 AM
What do we define as Noir?

joshsapien
03-03-2008, 10:02 AM
Out of the Past

-josh

Jonathan Callan
03-03-2008, 10:03 AM
What do we define as Noir?

Hmm. Better left for experts beyond myself? Why don't we go with anything they'd talk about in the back of Criminal?

Fourthman
03-03-2008, 10:03 AM
The Man Who Wasn't There - Coens
Vertigo - Hitchcock
Breathless - Goddard
Bound - Wachowskis
Shadow of a Doubt - Hitchcock

Jonathan Callan
03-03-2008, 10:04 AM
The Man Who Wasn't There - Coens
Vertigo - Hitchcock
Breathless - Goddard
Bound - Wachowski's
Shadow of a Doubt - Hitchcock

Seen Bound, I have Breathless waiting to be watched. Been meaning to check out Vertigo for quite a while now.

I've also seen your name sake and that was just an astounding film.

c. page
03-03-2008, 10:06 AM
The Man Who Wasn't There - Coens
Vertigo - Hitchcock
Breathless - Goddard
Bound - Wachowskis
Shadow of a Doubt - Hitchcock

:thumb:

great fucking list all the way around.

Rosemary's Baby
03-03-2008, 10:07 AM
Naked City
Sunset Blvd.
Chinatown
Breathless
Le Samurai

Some of those are neo-noir, which I assume we're including.

silverboy
03-03-2008, 10:08 AM
LA Confidential

CapnChaos
03-03-2008, 10:08 AM
Maltese Falcon, of course.

And Batman: Mask of the Phantasm. No, seriously.

Georgie
03-03-2008, 10:08 AM
The Big Sleep
Out Of The Past
Touch Of Evil
The Set-Up
Gilda

That's probably my top 5.

Georgie
03-03-2008, 10:09 AM
Maltese Falcon, of course.



It was a toss-up between that and Gilda, but I all ready had a Bogie film on my list. Such a good one.

Rafiennes
03-03-2008, 10:10 AM
The Third Man

http://media.sacbee.com/smedia/2007/05/18/12/194-unwind2.embedded.prod_affiliate.4.jpg

Jonathan Callan
03-03-2008, 10:10 AM
Chinatown and LA Confidential I've seen. Maybe we should exclude Neo-Noir? Or at least the obvious ones? I'd be a pretty piss-poor screen-writing student if I hadn't seen Chinatown after all.

But a lot of interesting recommendations so far.



And Batman: Mask of the Phantasm. No, seriously.

Amazing fucking film. I completely agree.

MicahO
03-03-2008, 10:11 AM
I'm one of those noir purist. No movie past 1945 can have have the noir title but it can elements of those movies that said.

The Big Sleep
Maltese Falcon
Key Largo
To Have or Have Not

NickT
03-03-2008, 10:12 AM
Hmm. Better left for experts beyond myself? Why don't we go with anything they'd talk about in the back of Criminal?
It's one of those things where I've never worked out entirely what it means, and I think a lot of other people don't either ;) . It's like how the term Pulp can be used to describe quite wide reaching areas :)



If they count...

Maltese Falcon
Chinatown
Kiss Kiss Bang Bang



Sidenote, I saw some of a movie described as Noir over the weekend starring Lloyd Bridges. Because of the movies I know him from, I couldn't take it seriously :)

Roman Noodles
03-03-2008, 10:12 AM
Double Indemnity, Vertigo and Sunset Boulevard are classic Noir films.

While Memento, Fight Club, Blue Velvet, Sin City, Mullholand Drive, A History of Violence, and Brick are very good examples of the newer noir films.

You can also include films like Minority Report, Blade Runner, Gattaca, and Twelve Monkeys as "Future Noir" films.


The list goes ON AND ON. I love Noir.

Roman Noodles
03-03-2008, 10:15 AM
I actually think it will be impossible to narrow it down to even 10 best. There are so many phenomenal noir films.

Evan Wiener
03-03-2008, 10:18 AM
Kiss Kiss Bang Bang is a great suggestion, since so few people I know saw it, but would like it.

Jonathan Callan
03-03-2008, 10:18 AM
1

Jonathan Callan
03-03-2008, 10:19 AM
I actually think it will be impossible to narrow it down to even 10 best. There are so many phenomenal noir films.

Yeah. Maybe we should focus on classic? Considering the neo-noire and future noir you've named, I've seen every one of those films.

I've obviously seen everything Shane Black has ever done, a lot of David Lynch, etc.

Tuco
03-03-2008, 10:23 AM
Chinatown
LA Confidential
Sharky's Machine
Miller's Crossing

Roman Noodles
03-03-2008, 10:24 AM
Yeah, I think we should focus on clasic for me it's

Vertigo
Sunset Boulevard
Double Indemnity
Key Largo
Cape Fear

Rafiennes
03-03-2008, 10:25 AM
Once again, let me say..


THE THIRD MAN


see it and see one of the cornerstones of all noir films...

Jonathan Callan
03-03-2008, 10:29 AM
Once again, let me say..


THE THIRD MAN


see it and see one of the cornerstones of all noir films...

Like I said in an earlier post, I already have seen The Third Man. It was one of the greatest films I've seen. But thanks for the recommendation.

PeterSparker
03-03-2008, 10:32 AM
The Man Who Wasn't There - Coens
Vertigo - Hitchcock
Breathless - Goddard
Bound - Wachowskis
Shadow of a Doubt - Hitchcock

Hm, never really thought of 'Vertigo' as noir before. But the definition does vary widely. A lot of stuff can come under the umbrella for sure in this category.


mine would probably be:

The Asphault Jungle
Notorious
Key Largo
The Big Sleep
Out of the Past


with much love for The Maltese Falcon, Laura, Double Indemnity, The Third Man, and The Postman Always Rings Twice. And even more love for the more modern versions, Chinatown, Blood Simple, Blue Velvet, LA Confidential and Mullholand Drive.

Roman Noodles
03-03-2008, 10:33 AM
Vertigo is very noir, especially in it's visual style.

Patton
03-03-2008, 10:37 AM
Also I kind of liked

Witness to Murder

dasNdanger
03-03-2008, 10:40 AM
My Top 5 are:

Murder, My Sweet (considered to be the best example of film noir)
Maltese Falcon (considered the first example of film noir - though some argue the credit goes to Stranger on the Third Floor - another fav of mine)
Double Indemnity
Shadow of a Doubt (I consider this one borderline noir, but it is just about my fav movie of all time, so it makes the list)
The Third Man

Those be me top favs...but I have dozens more.

das

Jonny Z
03-03-2008, 10:41 AM
Detour is one of my favorite over-the-top noirs.

double indemnity was the first example of noir that i watched years ago that made me take notice of the genre.

kiss me deadly is another good movie- not a great noir, but definitely up there

Patton
03-03-2008, 10:42 AM
I've tried to watch Double Indemnity twice now and couldn't get into it. I can't figure out why.

PeterSparker
03-03-2008, 10:58 AM
I've tried to watch Double Indemnity twice now and couldn't get into it. I can't figure out why.


Maybe it's because you're a communist?!!!?!!?

Honestly, I'm a little surprised to hear that. I mean the dialogue is outstanding throughout, just so much fun. You have Keyes (Edward G. in one of his best performances) and his "little man", the great Fred MacMurray, and of course the amazing Barbara Stanwyck (and her legs!!!). Such a great flick, give it one more try.


On a side note, Barbara Stanwyck is one of my two or three favorite actress' ever! She could do it all, and was so original, and so beautiful to look at in her somewhat unconventional way. She could do 'Double Indemnity' and then something like 'The Lady Eve', roles wich are so far apart, and still make it look so easy. Love her!

Doug
03-03-2008, 10:58 AM
The Third Man

http://media.sacbee.com/smedia/2007/05/18/12/194-unwind2.embedded.prod_affiliate.4.jpg

That is one of my top 3 favorite films.

Other great Noirs are:
Sunset Blvd
The Big Sleep (Bogie version)


I want to say Rebecca, but I think of that as Gothic and not Noir.

Fourthman
03-03-2008, 11:12 AM
The Third Man sounds familiar, almost like a family member or something...

dasNdanger
03-03-2008, 11:15 AM
The Third Man sounds familiar, almost like a family member or something...

:lol:


das

schizorabbit
03-03-2008, 11:25 AM
I have a confession to make. As much as I love Brubaker's Criminal, I am frequently intimidated by the back-matter. There is so much discussion of movies I've never heard of, let alone seen. I have a good background in modern noir movies I suppose, but guys like Brubaker and Siuntres just blow me away with everything they know about the genre.

So here's an exercise. Do people want to recommend their top 5 favorite noir films and then I'll check out the ones that there seems to be a good consensus for?


Night of the Fucking Hunter. (Take out "Fucking" to get the true title).

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0048424/

Robert Mitchum was, like, Mr. Noir Boogeyman creeping the hell out of the little brother and sister throughout the film.

dasNdanger
03-03-2008, 11:30 AM
Night of the Fucking Hunter. (Take out "Fucking" to get the true title).

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0048424/

Robert Mitchum was, like, Mr. Noir Boogeyman creeping the hell out of the little brother and sister throughout the film.


Night of the Hunter was an underrated film at the time, and only just now (last 20 years or so) coming into its own. Great film.


das

Drkemerld73
03-03-2008, 11:32 AM
Once again, let me say..


THE THIRD MAN


see it and see one of the cornerstones of all noir films...

Honestly...

I really did not like this film.

It felt very... I dunno... Schizophrenic and I wasn't sure what it was trying to be.

The first half bored me, but then the second half got interesting and then it just ended.

dasNdanger
03-03-2008, 11:39 AM
Honestly...

I really did not like this film.

It felt very... I dunno... Schizophrenic and I wasn't sure what it was trying to be.

The first half bored me, but then the second half got interesting and then it just ended.

Yeah, that's what makes it a great film!

It is 'schizophrenic' in a way because you are looking at it through Holly Martins' eyes. His experience changes greatly, from believing his friend is a good man, and a victim, to learning that he's a bad man, and the culprit. It's a film of two halves, as the Brits would say of a rugby match. First half is different from the second, due to a change in direction for the main character. I love it - especially the music, and the odd batmanish camera angles, and the overall moodiness of the pic. Good film to watch with other people who appreciate it...that can change your experience greatly.

das

Patton
03-03-2008, 11:41 AM
Maybe it's because you're a communist?!!!?!!?

Honestly, I'm a little surprised to hear that. I mean the dialogue is outstanding throughout, just so much fun. You have Keyes (Edward G. in one of his best performances) and his "little man", the great Fred MacMurray, and of course the amazing Barbara Stanwyck (and her legs!!!). Such a great flick, give it one more try.


On a side note, Barbara Stanwyck is one of my two or three favorite actress' ever! She could do it all, and was so original, and so beautiful to look at in her somewhat unconventional way. She could do 'Double Indemnity' and then something like 'The Lady Eve', roles wich are so far apart, and still make it look so easy. Love her!

I love Barbara Stanwyck. And I agree, she was quite versatile.

I'm gonna try Double Indemnity again soon. I DVRed it off of TCM recently.

sonnylarue
03-03-2008, 11:45 AM
here's 5 ...there's plent of others
the glass key
out of the past
this gun for hire
rififi
gun crazy

Drkemerld73
03-03-2008, 11:45 AM
Yeah, that's what makes it a great film!

It is 'schizophrenic' in a way because you are looking at it through Holly Martins' eyes. His experience changes greatly, from believing his friend is a good man, and a victim, to learning that he's a bad man, and the culprit. It's a film of two halves, as the Brits would say of a rugby match. First half is different from the second, due to a change in direction for the main character. I love it - especially the music, and the odd batmanish camera angles, and the overall moodiness of the pic. Good film to watch with other people who appreciate it...that can change your experience greatly.

das

I was fine with the reveal. That was at least cool.

If I remember my thoughts throughout the viewing, I felt that the 1st half was almost cartoonish with him running around going through the experiences. I didn't like that feeling for what I thought was going to be a serious boiler of a film.

Only when the 2nd half got more deadly serious about what was going on did I find it gripping.

dasNdanger
03-03-2008, 11:51 AM
I was fine with the reveal. That was at least cool.

If I remember my thoughts throughout the viewing, I felt that the 1st half was almost cartoonish with him running around going through the experiences. I didn't like that feeling for what I thought was going to be a serious boiler of a film.

Only when the 2nd half got more deadly serious about what was going on did I find it gripping.


Then, I believe, you got the point. When he first arrives, he is innocent, naive...he's a bit idealistic, perhaps (I'm here - my buddy's gonna get me a job! Woot!). He doesn't get the seriousness of the situation. He's a bit irresponsible, perhaps. By the end of the film, he's gotten a good dose of reality, and both the mood of the film, and the character, changes. That's how I see it...you make the journey with the character - the way YOU see the first half of the film is the way the character is seeing the situation - it's all a bit silly to him. Then...reality hits, and things change, for him...for the audience.

I love a film that take you on the same journey as the character, and I feel this is a good example of that. Instead of just watching him do his stuff, you are feeling the same way he's feeling - even though you don't fully realize it. 'This is silly...why are the answers coming so slow...blah, blah, blah...' then - 'Bam!' - and both the character - and the audience - sit up and take notice, all at once.


das

Drkemerld73
03-03-2008, 12:04 PM
Then, I believe, you got the point. When he first arrives, he is innocent, naive...he's a bit idealistic, perhaps (I'm here - my buddy's gonna get me a job! Woot!). He doesn't get the seriousness of the situation. He's a bit irresponsible, perhaps. By the end of the film, he's gotten a good dose of reality, and both the mood of the film, and the character, changes. That's how I see it...you make the journey with the character - the way YOU see the first half of the film is the way the character is seeing the situation - it's all a bit silly to him. Then...reality hits, and things change, for him...for the audience.

I love a film that take you on the same journey as the character, and I feel this is a good example of that. Instead of just watching him do his stuff, you are feeling the same way he's feeling - even though you don't fully realize it. 'This is silly...why are the answers coming so slow...blah, blah, blah...' then - 'Bam!' - and both the character - and the audience - sit up and take notice, all at once.

das

I can see what you're saying.

I respect the film, and maybe one day I'll revisit it, but I just found it disappointing.

I guess maybe I fell into the hype it was given by the board and was expecting it to be the way I've been used to other noir films, which probably was my first mistake since it is a classic film, and sometimes you just have to sit back and view it differently than you would a modern film.

dasNdanger
03-03-2008, 12:15 PM
I can see what you're saying.

I respect the film, and maybe one day I'll revisit it, but I just found it disappointing.

I guess maybe I fell into the hype it was given by the board and was expecting it to be the way I've been used to other noir films, which probably was my first mistake since it is a classic film, and sometimes you just have to sit back and view it differently than you would a modern film.

Revisting a film is always a good idea. First time I watched O Brother, Where Art Thou, I was like...meh. Second time I watched it, I got obsessively hooked - and ended up watching it like 20 times in two weeks.

Sometimes the 'first time' isn't always the best time, ifyouknowwhatimean.

;)

das

Drkemerld73
03-03-2008, 12:28 PM
Revisting a film is always a good idea. First time I watched O Brother, Where Art Thou, I was like...meh. Second time I watched it, I got obsessively hooked - and ended up watching it like 20 times in two weeks.

Sometimes the 'first time' isn't always the best time, ifyouknowwhatimean.

;)

das

That's funny. I loved O Brother, Where Art Thou the first time I saw it. :)

Yeah. I know what you mean about the whole first time viewing, but I usually am pretty good when it comes to that. At the same time I'll be Ok if it's a film that doesn't really speak to me. :)

Thanks for explaining what you get from the film. Maybe that can help me view it from a different perspective and possibly appreciate it more.

dasNdanger
03-03-2008, 12:36 PM
That's funny. I loved O Brother, Where Art Thou the first time I saw it. :)

Yeah. I know what you mean about the whole first time viewing, but I usually am pretty good when it comes to that. At the same time I'll be Ok if it's a film that doesn't really speak to me. :)

Thanks for explaining what you get from the film. Maybe that can help me view it from a different perspective and possibly appreciate it more.

Yeah - some things work, some don't. The things that click with me are often very obscure things...a certain camera angle, a certain aspect of a character, a certain note in a song. If I had to explain WHAT works for me, it'd make your head hurt. Like the Wraith in my sig and avatar - why do I love these characters (when everyone else is creeped out by them)? It is so hard to explain - just easier for me to say they're 'hawt!' and leave it at that, because the thing that REALLY works for me is a bit...complex.

So - can't force a person to like a film, or a character, or whatever. We each have those things that 'click' with us - where we perhaps make a personal connection to a film in some way - and to explain why it works - or why it doesn't - is just too complicated.

das

Drkemerld73
03-03-2008, 12:42 PM
So - can't force a person to like a film, or a character, or whatever. We each have those things that 'click' with us - where we perhaps make a personal connection to a film in some way - and to explain why it works - or why it doesn't - is just too complicated.

das

Very true.

I have films that I truely adore, but some people just don't "get" it, even though it resonates strongly in me for one reason or another.

But half the fun of trying to explain allows the person you're talking with to gain a deeper insight as to what makes you, you. :)

And if it doesn't, at least you tried.

dasNdanger
03-03-2008, 12:51 PM
Very true.

I have films that I truely adore, but some people just don't "get" it, even though it resonates strongly in me for one reason or another.

But half the fun of trying to explain allows the person you're talking with to gain a deeper insight as to what makes you, you. :)

And if it doesn't, at least you tried.

Very true. Also, I think it helps you to understand yourself a bit better, too. I know after I try explaining my tastes to someone, I sit back and think about myself...and say, "Man, das...you are freakin' CRAZY!" :lol:

:p

das

Drkemerld73
03-03-2008, 12:58 PM
Very true. Also, I think it helps you to understand yourself a bit better, too. I know after I try explaining my tastes to someone, I sit back and think about myself...and say, "Man, das...you are freakin' CRAZY!" :lol:

:p

das

Usually for me, they sit there and I get that look.

You know the one.

The one where they're looking at you and you feel all exposed and somehow feel as though you're messed up and they are trying to think of a way to run away from you, or at the least humor you.

:lol:

Patrick J
03-03-2008, 01:03 PM
The Third Man
A Touch of Evil
Breathless
Le Samouraļ
Bound

Jonathan Callan
03-03-2008, 01:06 PM
here's 5 ...there's plent of others
the glass key
out of the past
this gun for hire
rififi
gun crazy

Well, with a recommendation from John - I'll likely be trying to find all of these films.

schizorabbit
03-03-2008, 01:06 PM
The Third Man
A Touch of Evil
Breathless
Le Samouraļ
Bound

Hmmm, Bound could also be placed in the subcategory of "Top 5 Noir Films to Beat Off To."

Jonathan Callan
03-03-2008, 01:08 PM
I was fine with the reveal. That was at least cool.

If I remember my thoughts throughout the viewing, I felt that the 1st half was almost cartoonish with him running around going through the experiences. I didn't like that feeling for what I thought was going to be a serious boiler of a film.

Only when the 2nd half got more deadly serious about what was going on did I find it gripping.

I would say surreal rather than cartoonish. It's a noir film not shot like a noir film, which is one of the things that's so cool about it.

Thommy Melanson
03-03-2008, 01:08 PM
Out Of The Past
Kansas City Confidential
Chinatown
Third Man
A Touch Of Evil

dasNdanger
03-03-2008, 01:10 PM
Usually for me I sit there and I get that look.

You know the one. The one where they're looking at you and you feel all exposed and somehow feel as though you're messed up and they are trying to think of a way to run away from you, or at the least humor you. :lol:

YES!!! I KNOW the look! Just this weekend I sat my sister down and made her watch several episodes of Stargate Atlantis, to TRY to show her why the Wraith appeal to me...

Me: "Well...El...you see...they NEED to feed on humans, it's the only thing that sustains them...they can't eat anything else or they will die."

Sister: :mistrust:

Me: "Doesn't that make you feel slightly sorry for them...I mean...they're starving...hunger burns like a fire inside of them...they have no control over what they are, what they are born as."

Sister: :mistrust: :mistrust:

Me: "It's their nature...so...when you see them feeding...they are only acting on instinct - the instinct to survive. It's just as beautiful as watching a lion feed on a gazelle, or a hawk on a sparrow...."

Sister: :scared:

Me: "And they are such proud creatures, unashamed of what they are...what they must do to survive in a world that's suddenly become very hostile to them. It's really very deep when you think about it - especially when they must 'lower' themselves to interact with their human herds...or worse, ask their human herds for help. Kinda sad when you think about it..."

Sister: :mistrust: :scared: :mistrust:

Me: "And they ARE such sharp dressers, too! Beautiful hair...nice smiles....really super hawt!"

Sister :crazy:


Yeah - that's about how it went on Saturday... :p


das

Ashwin Pande
03-03-2008, 01:13 PM
The Killing - Best Heist film I've ever seen.
Out of the Past
The Big Sleep - Yeah the plot was kinda loose but the acting and the dialogue makes it kick ass. I remember reading that Faulkner called Chandler to figure out who killed the driver and Chandler told him 'You're writing it! You figure it out!!" I dunno if that's true or not but if it is it's awesome.
Double Indemnity
The Postman Always Rings Twice

glk
03-03-2008, 01:15 PM
Man, really too numerous to count. But here's five greats off the top of my head:

The Third Man
Out of the Past
The Night of the Hunter
Night and the City
LA Confidential

Le Cercle Rouge is good but I wasn't floored by it. It's been a huge inspiration to filmmakers like Quentin Tarrantino though. Same with Breathless - I liked it but didn't exactly love it.

smallchange
03-03-2008, 01:28 PM
I'm a noir fanatic, be it books or film, enough so where I would definitely say about 80% of the movies listed in this thread, while all good are definitely not "noir" films, most barely even qualify as "neo-noir". Just b/c a film has a noir element or two (Fight Club for example), it is in know way a noir-film.


If you are new to noir, or just trying to get into it, without out a doubt, the 3 films you should start out with are The Third Man (it is basically the film that most noirs are patterned after), Double Indemnity, & Out of the Past. The first two are the building blocks, of which all pure classic noir is based off of, Out of the Past IMO is a great starting point for just how old-school bad-ass a noir character can be, with Mitchum just owning a the film.

My personal 5 favorite pure noir films are:

Narrow Margin (my favorite noir ever, greatest train movie ever made, no music track at all, & Charles McGraw who is just a gravel-voiced hardboiled bad-ass).
Murder, My Sweet (the greatest Phillip Marlowe ever put to screen, Dick Powell may give my favorite male perfomance in any noir ever)
Kiss Me Deadly (Richard Widmark is one of the most prolific noir actors ever, & his villain in this film is one of the greatest of all-time)
Out of the Past (it's what made me a noir film fanatic)
The Killing (My favorite Kubrick film ever, so many nuances in this film, acting, writing, probably my 2nd favorite noir of all-time)

My all-time favorite "neo-noirs"

Charley Varrick (maybe my favorite noir film period)
Point Blank
The Long Goodbye
Night Moves (hands down the greatest Gene Hackman film ever)
Le Samourai - Delon creates one of the coolest characters ever put to film.

Rivka
03-03-2008, 01:56 PM
Double Indemnity, Vertigo and Sunset Boulevard are classic Noir films.

While Memento, Fight Club, Blue Velvet, Sin City, Mullholand Drive, A History of Violence, and Brick are very good examples of the newer noir films.

You can also include films like Minority Report, Blade Runner, Gattaca, and Twelve Monkeys as "Future Noir" films.


The list goes ON AND ON. I love Noir.

Good analysis. There's "classic noir" and modern noir and now you've coined "future noir." Good call.

In the classic noir category, I think most of the greats have already been mentioned.


Bogart:

THE MALTESE FALCON
TO HAVE AND HAVE NOT
THE BIG SLEEP

Ladd and Lake:

THE GLASS KEY
THIS GUN FOR HIRE
THE BLUE DAHLIA

Okay, we're supposed to pick just five. That's hard to do.

DOUBLE INDEMNITY
SUNSET BOULEVARD

THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE (John Garfield version)
GILDA

TOUCH OF EVIL

KISS OF DEATH
NIGHT AND THE CITY
THE ASPHALT JUNGLE
DOA

THE BIG HEAT
WHITE HEAT

Modern Noir: We can't forget Kasdan's BODY HEAT with William Hurt and Kathleen Turner, and I agree with CHINATOWN, and MOMENTO, and MULHOLLAND DRIVE. Also, a brilliant film NIGHT MOVES, and Coppola's THE CONVERSATION. Also, Bryan Singer's THE USUAL SUSPECTS. LA CONFIDENTIAL, of course. No one ever mentions KLUTE in this list, but I consider it modern film noir, as well.

I'm not sure I'd say NIGHT OF THE HUNTER was a film noir, though, even though some experts say it is. Film noir features heroes who are corruptible and morally ambiguous, and femme fatales who can have a heart of gold while they can stab you in the back. NIGHT OF THE HUNTER is about good vs. evil, and there isn't much in-between. The children are pure and innocent, and Gish's character is like a guardian angel. The original book reads like a long poem, and is written without punctuation in verse-like prose; it's lyrical and stunning, actually. Anyway, I know some consider NIGHT OF THE HUNTER to be noir, but I don't. It's more a parable about innocence and evil.

THE TREASURE OF SIERRA MADRE is a kind of Western Film Noir.

I'm sure I'm forgetting something.

Gavin
04-22-2008, 11:09 AM
The Third Man
Naked City
The Killing
The Asphault Jungle
A Touch of Evil

Hurnslice
04-22-2008, 11:36 AM
Great idea for a thread.

I'm a big Burt Lancaster fan. The Killers (1946) is one of my favorites.

Insomnia (1997) with Skarsgard is "reverse" noir, using light instead of dark, is awsome, and should not be confused with the Pachino/Williams piece of crap.

Amedeo
04-22-2008, 11:58 AM
Out of the Past cannot be recommended enough. It is not only my favorite noir, but it's one of my favorite films in any genre.

JoshuaFialkov
04-22-2008, 12:30 PM
DOA (the original, not the remake, or, for that matter, Crank) is amazing. Easily one of my favorite movies of all time.

Touch of Evil It's no Kane, but... what is?

The Killing/Killer's Kiss To see Kubrick deal with the cliches of Noir and just redefine the visuals of the medium...

Scarface (1932) Okay, so it predates Film Noir by a decade or so, but, you really get to see where it all comes from. Hawks does such an amazing job creating a dirty filthy world you just can't escape.

Tom Burgos
04-22-2008, 12:31 PM
There are many different types of film noirs and film noir archetypes, but if you (like myself) are a fan of the Femme Fatale, please check out THE GRIFTERS, THE LAST SEDUCTION, and what is unquestionably considered one of the top five best modern film noirs ever, BODY HEAT.


Annette Bening and Angelica Huston, Linda Fiorentino and especially Kathleen Turner SCORCH the screen in performances that redefined the femme fatale archetype for modern audiences.

Seriously, those are all amazing films.


And for others I love in this genre, ROMEO IS BLEEDING (Gary Oldman, Lena Olin, Juliette Lewis) is a phenomenal (and sadly almost forgotten) piece of neo0noir...

LordKinbote
04-22-2008, 01:15 PM
I'm surprised it took someone until the second page to mention both "Night Moves" and "Body Heat". Both great, moody films, and "Night Moves" has a script that just crackles.

Here's another modern noir worth seeing that hasn't been mentioned: "After Dark, My Sweet". It stars Jason Patric as a brain damaged boxer who is manipulated into committing a crime.

Oh! Also, last year's "The Lookout", starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt as a brain damaged hockey player who is manipulated into committing a crime.

Hey, wait a minute!

Seriously, despite the similarity, they're both excellent.

Scotty
04-22-2008, 01:46 PM
Brick

Servo106
04-22-2008, 01:49 PM
Sunset Blvd.
Double Indemnity
Maltese Falcon
Touch of Evil
Rebecca (very noir in visual style if not in tone)

SCOURGE
04-22-2008, 02:04 PM
Detour is one of my favorite over-the-top noirs.

double indemnity was the first example of noir that i watched years ago that made me take notice of the genre.

kiss me deadly is another good movie- not a great noir, but definitely up there

Double Indemnity is one of the best...

Taxman
04-25-2008, 05:35 PM
Quick shout out to the Oeming Four

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v410/glima/Covers/thisgun.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v410/glima/Covers/TheKilling.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v410/glima/Covers/out_of_the_past.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v410/glima/Covers/nocturne.jpg

adam_warlock_2099
04-25-2008, 05:45 PM
Maltese Falcon, of course.

And Batman: Mask of the Phantasm. No, seriously.

Yes . . .

. . . and Key Largo.

HoldFastNow
04-30-2008, 04:09 PM
Blast of Silence

Out of the Past

The Third Man

To Have and Have Not

Chinatown

Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang

Who Framed Rodger Rabbit (which was both an homage to Chinatown as well as partially based on the idea for the second film in a planned Chinatown-trilogy that never materialized).

Jamie S. Rich
04-30-2008, 08:40 PM
I'm one of those noir purist. No movie past 1945 can have have the noir title but it can elements of those movies that said.


I'm a purist, too, but that's a ridiculously narrow definition. 1945? I'd say you have to at least let 10 more years in there, with Kiss Me Deadly in 1955 being a pretty good cap for how far the genre could go. And an allowance, of course, for Touch of Evil three years later. The style really percolated through the war years and then exploded after the end of the conflict. For instance, you get seminal works like The Killers in 1946, Born to Kill and Born to Kill in 1947, Night and the City in 1950, and The Big Heat in 1953.

Plus, no color for a pure entry in the genre.

I notice Kiss Kiss Bang Bang on a lot of lists, too, and even for neo-noir (a name I can't stand, really, that's a stretch. It's a good movie, but it's far more satirical than I think the style allows.

If I had to pick a tough five right now (I also am a purist for top five lists and detest going over the line; society is built on rules, people! :b ), I'd say my most commonly watched are:

The Maltese Falcon (1941)

Out of the Past

Criss Cross (1948 )

Double Indemnity (1944)

Gilda (1946)

Jamie S. Rich
04-30-2008, 08:44 PM
Who Framed Rodger Rabbit (which was both an homage to Chinatown as well as partially based on the idea for the second film in a planned Chinatown-trilogy that never materialized).

You mean The Two Jakes? Because it's the third that never materialized, all featuring a theme of some kind of element of development of California. In fact, since I hadn't heard the Roger Rabbit connection before, I looked it up and found this on Wiki:

Chinatown was set in the 1930s and portrays water department corruption. It was the first part of a planned trilogy written by Robert Towne about the character J.J. Gittes and Los Angeles government. The second part, The Two Jakes, was about the natural gas department in Los Angeles in the 1940s. It was directed by Jack Nicholson and released in 1990, however, the second film's commercial and critical failure scuttled plans to make Cloverleaf, a film about the development of the Los Angeles freeway system in the late 1940s. The plot for "Cloverleaf" later became the basis of the live action/animation film Who Framed Roger Rabbit.

HoldFastNow
04-30-2008, 09:36 PM
You mean The Two Jakes? Because it's the third that never materialized, all featuring a theme of some kind of element of development of California. In fact, since I hadn't heard the Roger Rabbit connection before, I looked it up and found this on Wiki:

Chinatown was set in the 1930s and portrays water department corruption. It was the first part of a planned trilogy written by Robert Towne about the character J.J. Gittes and Los Angeles government. The second part, The Two Jakes, was about the natural gas department in Los Angeles in the 1940s. It was directed by Jack Nicholson and released in 1990, however, the second film's commercial and critical failure scuttled plans to make Cloverleaf, a film about the development of the Los Angeles freeway system in the late 1940s. The plot for "Cloverleaf" later became the basis of the live action/animation film Who Framed Roger Rabbit.

Oh yeah, that's what I meant! I read about that a long time ago so my memory was being fuzzy.

Kurt Russell Crowe
04-30-2008, 10:30 PM
Red Rock West
Kill Me Again
Blood Simple
The Ice Harvest
Straw Dogs

S. Earl
04-30-2008, 10:30 PM
Just do yourselves a favor and make sure you check out The Long Goodbye.

danlomb
04-30-2008, 10:42 PM
The only thing that hasn't been mentioned that could maybe possibly fit in is
Death Wish.

Dusto
05-01-2008, 05:09 AM
Detour
Double Indemnity
The Third Man
M
The Maltese Falcon

Rafiennes
05-01-2008, 05:22 AM
Two movies I just watched that are wonderfully noir:

Asphalt Jungle
The Tin Star

SMACK!
05-01-2008, 05:36 AM
Maltese Falcon
Double Indemnity
Laura
The Postman Always Rings Twice
Blast of Silence