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Nick_Borelli
05-31-2005, 02:04 PM
Superman.
Batman.
PROBABLY Wonder Woman.
Spiderman?
Hulk?
Captain Marvel?
Captain America?

What makes a comic character an icon?
Which comic characters would you concider "iconic" (not just inside the arena of fanboys but to the masses)?

niceguyeddie
05-31-2005, 02:14 PM
usually i just think it has to be reknown by fans and non-fans alike.

Nick_Borelli
05-31-2005, 02:18 PM
Robin is probably more Iconic than Wonder Woman.

Those are just super heroes though.

Snoopy, Charlie Brown, Dennis the Menace, etc. are strip characters that are to the level of "iconic".

THWIP!
05-31-2005, 02:26 PM
Foxtrot

Scott JB
05-31-2005, 03:01 PM
If my dad has heard of them, they are iconic.

Cth
05-31-2005, 03:13 PM
Generally, a unique character with identifiable traits.

A template that others follow, so to speak.

Nick_Borelli
05-31-2005, 03:15 PM
Generally, a unique character with identifiable traits.

A template that others follow, so to speak.

Others mimicing them shows that they are iconic?
That's actually a pretty good way to figure it out.

Bill?
05-31-2005, 03:16 PM
What makes an Icon? Bendis, Oeming, and Mack do, apparently.

http://www.comicbooksetc.com/graphics/News%20Images/icon.jpg

Nick_Borelli
05-31-2005, 03:21 PM
What makes an Icon? Bendis, Oeming, and Mack do, apparently.

http://www.comicbooksetc.com/graphics/News%20Images/icon.jpg

Yah, I was going to say selling mainstream books for Quesada and wanting your creator owned stuff to reach tons of people is a way to make an icon.

Also, you forgot JMS's upcoming stuff.

Bill?
05-31-2005, 03:24 PM
Yah, I was going to say selling mainstream books for Quesada and wanting your creator owned stuff to reach tons of people is a way to make an icon.

Also, you forgot JMS's upcoming stuff.


I donít care what imprint you slap in the corner, JMS doesnít make comic book icons.
He just retells the same three themes from B5 over and over again.

:p

Cth
05-31-2005, 03:32 PM
Others mimicing them shows that they are iconic?
That's actually a pretty good way to figure it out.

Well, if they can be traced back to another character, it's derivative.

It also helps if they serve another purpose other than pure storytelling.. if they can be allegorical it's likely iconic.

Although, to some degree all "heroes" can be traced back to Greek myths and the sort..

For me, Superman is iconic for the following reasons:

- He's the prototypical alien come to learn of Earth. He follows the American dream by growing up as a farm boy and moves onto life in the "big city"

Contrast this to say, Mr. Majestic/Apollo/Hyperion/all the other clones..

Generally, they offer nothing new, and invite comparisons to other existing characters.

It can be done, but someone has to put a unique spin on it.

For example..

Miracleman started out as a generic Superman type character, but evolved into an allegorical warning against tyranny and the nature of power itself.

Subsequent series that have dealt with this dilema are derivative, IMO unless they deviate enough from the source to stand alone in a new allegory.

If that makes sense.

Nick_Borelli
05-31-2005, 04:01 PM
Well, if they can be traced back to another character, it's derivative.

It also helps if they serve another purpose other than pure storytelling.. if they can be allegorical it's likely iconic.

Although, to some degree all "heroes" can be traced back to Greek myths and the sort..

For me, Superman is iconic for the following reasons:

- He's the prototypical alien come to learn of Earth. He follows the American dream by growing up as a farm boy and moves onto life in the "big city"

Contrast this to say, Mr. Majestic/Apollo/Hyperion/all the other clones..

Generally, they offer nothing new, and invite comparisons to other existing characters.

It can be done, but someone has to put a unique spin on it.

For example..

Miracleman started out as a generic Superman type character, but evolved into an allegorical warning against tyranny and the nature of power itself.

Subsequent series that have dealt with this dilema are derivative, IMO unless they deviate enough from the source to stand alone in a new allegory.

If that makes sense.

It makes a lot of sense.
Good definition.

So under that criteria...what other comic characters are "icons"?

Cth
05-31-2005, 04:19 PM
It makes a lot of sense.
Good definition.

So under that criteria...what other comic characters are "icons"?

Sticking mostly to DC & Marvel here..
------------------------------------
Hulk
Spider-Man
Captain America
Superman
Batman
Wonder Woman
Fantastic Four
X-Men (although some argue with the whole Doom Patrol thing.. my definition being the allegory thing.. which X-Men passes.. whereas Doom Patrol was mostly just freaks and accident victims)

Spawn (although this is derivative of the Faust legend)
Cerebus (derivative of Conan, but grew into its own)

This is why, at least for me, new comics need to offer something new and offer the allegory to elevate it above all the competition.

The added bonus being that it can be discussed on a literary merit level, rather than a pure artistic one (both writing and art)