PDA

View Full Version : What Has Happened To Our Movie's Ratings?



adam_warlock_2099
11-20-2007, 06:04 AM
Yeah I know I am a little late in posting something about a movie that is 20 some years old. But still . . . I watched Ghostbusters last night for the first time.

I was on some rant of the hotness that is Sigourney Weaver, so my wife went out and bought Ghostbusters I and II (haven't watched II yet). So I am sitting there watching this movie and as it gets closer and closer to the end, I'm thinking I know why my parents wouldn't let me watch this, it has to be rated R.

You've got Dan Aykroyd's ghostly oral sex. The free use of "dick" (which they won't even allow on TV), the other swearing (which although not really numerous was still there), and Sigourney Weaver's attempt to seduce Bill Murray.

None of these in themselves are all that bad, but when I flipped the box over and saw that it was rated PG, that somewhat surprised me. I figured it would be at least PG-13, maybe R.

Maybe my perception is just wrong. But I would think that same exact movie today would have a much heavier rating. What's up with that? I mean does that say that in the 80's people weren't offended so much as they are now, so as to have heavier ratings for things that then got lighter ratings? Or am I just so bored that I just wanted to write a thread to tell you all that I finally watched Ghostbusters?

What are your thoughts?

Jim T.
11-20-2007, 06:08 AM
That oral sex scene wasn't in the theatre cut, was it? I thought that was a deleted scene that was added back in later years.

Roger
11-20-2007, 06:09 AM
we've become alot more scared and wimpy through the years....
:(

thank you PC police.....sigh

bartleby
11-20-2007, 06:10 AM
GHOSTBUSTERS predates the inception of the PG-13 rating. Had it came out a year later, it would likely have gotten that rating.

Beep Beep!
11-20-2007, 06:14 AM
The original Planet of the Apes was rated G. Explain that.

Taxman
11-20-2007, 06:18 AM
The original Planet of the Apes was rated G. Explain that.It must predate the inception of the PG rating. ;)

adam_warlock_2099
11-20-2007, 06:23 AM
That oral sex scene wasn't in the theatre cut, was it? I thought that was a deleted scene that was added back in later years.

Well then if that is the case, that does seem to make a difference in the rating. It didn't really seem to fit in the movie, or get explained so now that you say that, that does make more sense.


GHOSTBUSTERS predates the inception of the PG-13 rating. Had it came out a year later, it would likely have gotten that rating.

Didn't know that. I was a sheltered child. ;-)

Fourthman
11-20-2007, 06:31 AM
Were in a (comparatively) conservative rating period right now. It'll swing back the other way eventually, and then back to this bullshit again.

NickT
11-20-2007, 06:34 AM
How did the Star Wars prequels all get kid-friendly ratings? It happens.

Fourthman
11-20-2007, 06:38 AM
How did the Star Wars prequels all get kid-friendly ratings? It happens.

Bart can probably say more on this, but big budget films are far more likely to get the rating they're aiming for (with minimal editing) than smaller budget independent films.

FredC
11-20-2007, 06:40 AM
How did the Star Wars prequels all get kid-friendly ratings? It happens.

I don't see what you mean. They were (except for Episode III) PG.

Episode I seems pretty PG... so does Episode II.

Not really sure where you're coming from.

NickT
11-20-2007, 06:54 AM
I don't see what you mean. They were (except for Episode III) PG.

Episode I seems pretty PG... so does Episode II.

Not really sure where you're coming from.
Limbs being hacked off and badly burnt people are PG? If we're to believe that the ratings are now more Conservative, how does that happen?




As an aside, the PG-13 history from Wikipedia:


Prior to July 1, 1984, there was a minor trend of films straddling the PG and R ratings (as shown by the MPAA records of appeals board decisions of the early 1980s). This suggested that there needed to be a middle ground between PG and R. The summer of 1982 featured Poltergeist, which was originally rated R (for intensity and a scene of drug use) but then re-rated PG on appeal. Disney's Dragonslayer (although PG without appeal, and a co-production with Paramount Pictures) alarmed many parents with scenes of explicit violence and gore. A larger percentage of films were allowed a PG rating despite limited use of strong language (Tootsie, Terms of Endearment, Sixteen Candles, Footloose) that initially had warranted an R rating until the appeals board changed their ratings to PG (thanks in large measure to precedents set in the 1970s, with All the President's Men at their forefront). [7] Its should be noted that if those films were released after 1984 they most likely would have received the PG-13 rating due to the content in the films.

Violent scenes in the 1984 PG-rated films Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, which Spielberg directed and Gremlins, which he produced, were the final straws. Public outcry about the violence led Spielberg to suggest a new rating called PG-14 to MPAA president Jack Valenti. Mr. Valenti and the MPAA decided instead on PG-13, conferred with theater owners and then introduced the new rating on July 1. The rating still allowed children under 13 to be admitted without a parent or guardian, but it cautions parents about potentially shocking violence or other offensive content, although not as offensive as an R rating. It is the highest unrestricted rating. The first movie to gain widespread theatrical release with a PG-13 rating was 1984's Red Dawn (although the first to receive the classification was The Flamingo Kid). It took a year for the PG-13 logo to shift into its current form. The initial rating, instead of using a line of boldface text followed by explanatory description below, bore the wording from 1984 to 1986:

Jef UK
11-20-2007, 07:06 AM
It's almost like mores aren't absolute and shift and evolve over time! Who knew?

bartleby
11-20-2007, 07:22 AM
How did the Star Wars prequels all get kid-friendly ratings? It happens.

No language. No sex. No adult situations. No blood. No real-world violence. Very minimal fantasy violence.

NickT
11-20-2007, 07:24 AM
No blood.
Darth Maul's death had blood.

bartleby
11-20-2007, 07:25 AM
Darth Maul's death had blood.

Pretty sure it didn't.

mike black
11-20-2007, 07:25 AM
The original Planet of the Apes was rated G. Explain that.

The Green Berets got a "G" rating. Explain that.

mike black
11-20-2007, 07:28 AM
Pretty sure it didn't.

There was a red "smoke" for a half second.

NickT
11-20-2007, 07:32 AM
There was a red "smoke" for a half second.
It was blood! A little, but blood was there! :)

WillieLee
11-20-2007, 08:03 AM
Same thing that happened to our grammar's.

Falcifer
11-20-2007, 08:13 AM
Sixteen Candles is/was PG rated, has nudity and even better, is that one of the first lines in the movie is, I cant believe it. They fucking forgot my birthday.

Taxman
11-20-2007, 08:49 AM
No blood. This reminds me of something that I read a long time ago. In Star Trek VI they used Pepto Bismol for the Klingon blood. Had they used stage blood, or anything red, the movie would have been given an "R" rating. That's an example of how silly some of this stuff is.

kylethoreau
11-20-2007, 09:37 AM
and this is why I think the MPAA should be shut the fuck down. I still don't think we need ratings. Honestly unless you're a fucking idiot you generally know whether or not a film will be appropriate for a kid.

but that's just me and my parents have let me watch horror since i was like 2.:roll: