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Mister Mets
10-29-2007, 03:00 PM
This is something I've been thinking about recently...

What modern director could be involved in an "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" type TV anthology?

You need someone who has name recognition and a fairly recognizable style.
And he or she (probably he) has to have enough free time and be prolific enough to introduce every episode, and direct a few each season.

This show wouldn't have to be on network TV, and could easily be on premium cable.

Rosemary's Baby
10-29-2007, 03:09 PM
Great question.

Johnnie To. The guy has made 20 movies since 2000. I'm sure he could fit in a show with his output.

PT Anderson. He has plenty of free time and is the exact opposite of To.

Nick Spencer
10-29-2007, 03:12 PM
Well, I'd say the most likely to do something like this would be MNS.

Not saying the best, just most likely.

bartleby
10-29-2007, 03:14 PM
Great question.

Johnnie To. The guy has made 20 movies since 2000. I'm sure he could fit in a show with his output.

PT Anderson. He has plenty of free time and is the exact opposite of To.

They both lack the name recognition that a show like this one need to get off the ground.

Albert
10-29-2007, 03:18 PM
Michael Bay.

Rosemary's Baby
10-29-2007, 03:19 PM
They both lack the name recognition that a show like this one need to get off the ground.

Wishful thinking on my part, I know.

I thought maybe Anderson. He did do Boogie Nights.

Really, there's only a few options if name recognition is to play a large role. Tarantino being one of them. Spielberg, Scorsese, Smith (ugh), Clooney, Eastwood.

NeverWanderer
10-29-2007, 03:19 PM
Honestly? I'd love to see a David Fincher series like this.

But that particular wish is ignoring the reality that it could never, ever happen.

Still, though... it'd be nice.

LittleBastard
10-29-2007, 04:46 PM
There is only one person who came to mind: M. Night Shyamalan

thatguyfromsyracuse
10-29-2007, 04:46 PM
Michael Bay.

Eli Roth

chazbot
10-29-2007, 04:51 PM
Robert Rodriguez

Mister Mets
10-29-2007, 05:57 PM
Some choices....

Martin Scorcese- Possibly too much of a perfectionist for something with these limitations. But he could get pretty much anyone he wants to star in the episodes, and could get De Niro to direct an episode or two.

Quentin Tarantino- He might agree to it, just because of the challenge. He's not a snob against TV, and has directed episodes of CSI and ER. He may not be prolific enough for something like this.

Kevin Smith- I don't know how many episodes he'd have set in the "Jerseyverse." While he's directed some TV stuff before, he doesn't seem like the type of guy who'd do the work necessary to run even thirteen half-hour episodes an year. And "slacker comedy" doesn't strike me as a good TV anthology format.

M. Night Shyamalan- He has a recognizable style, and the "twist" format could would work well as half-hour/ hour long TV episodes. A bit arrogant, and he'd come off as a douche in the intros.


Michael Bay.
I think he'd need a bigger budget than even an HBO show.


Great question.

Johnnie To. The guy has made 20 movies since 2000. I'm sure he could fit in a show with his output.

PT Anderson. He has plenty of free time and is the exact opposite of To.
While the name recognition's not there, either director could use a show like to this to increase their q rating. The big thing here would be whether any of them could get big actors to agree to episodes (which would go a long way in convincing a network to take the chance).

Icaruss
10-29-2007, 05:57 PM
Steven Spielberg's Amazing Stories.

Garth
10-29-2007, 06:10 PM
Alot of big names (at the time) got involved with Tales from the Crypt. It just depends on who is involved and the popularity of the show. Plus, TftC was a cable only show which automatically put it in another category and seem to attract alot of movie stars.

Mister Mets
10-29-2007, 06:19 PM
Alot of big names (at the time) got involved with Tales from the Crypt. It just depends on who is involved and the popularity of the show. Plus, TftC was a cable only show which automatically put it in another category and seem to attract alot of movie stars.
Cable allows more mature subject matter/ language/ violence, which is pretty much a must for Scorcese, Tarantino and Kevin Smith.
HBO also has a better reputation, and an insane budget.


Steven Spielberg's Amazing Stories.
If he wanted to do it, he'd get great stars and guest directors (Lucas, Coppola)

And he is also prolific, compared to the other choices. And one of the few directors who could make it work on network TV.

RickLM
10-29-2007, 06:51 PM
Joss Whedon is a good storyteller and he knows how to put out a quality weekly TV show, so wouldn't he be the logical choice?

PeterSparker
10-29-2007, 07:03 PM
Lana Wachowski

dasNdanger
10-29-2007, 07:03 PM
Robert Rodriguez

Ya know...that's who popped into my head first, too.

das

AAlgar
10-29-2007, 07:05 PM
Alot of big names (at the time) got involved with Tales from the Crypt. It just depends on who is involved and the popularity of the show. Plus, TftC was a cable only show which automatically put it in another category and seem to attract alot of movie stars.

A good recent example would be Masters of Horror, which has also brought in some pretty decent names.

Foolish Mortal
10-29-2007, 07:14 PM
They both lack the name recognition that a show like this one need to get off the ground.
Amazing Stories had Spielberg's name behind it, and had big name directors like Martin Scorsese, Robert Zemeckis, Clint Eastwood, Peter Hyams, Joe Dante, and Irvin Kershner doing some episodes.

But for whatever reason it failed. Anthology shows simply don't appeal to tv audiences today.

Gunter
10-29-2007, 07:19 PM
If he wanted to do it, he'd get great stars and guest directors (Lucas, Coppola)

And he is also prolific, compared to the other choices. And one of the few directors who could make it work on network TV.

I think it would probably only run a couple of years before a network would decide not to renew it.

AAlgar
10-29-2007, 07:23 PM
Amazing Stories had Spielberg's name behind it, and had big name directors like Martin Scorsese, Robert Zemeckis, Clint Eastwood, Peter Hyams, Joe Dante, and Irvin Kershner doing some episodes.

But for whatever reason it failed. Anthology shows simply don't appeal to tv audiences today.

Amazing Stories was 20 years ago. Not saying they'd far any better now, per se... but it is different audiences we're talking about now.

And I dunno, if you could somehow tie in some kind of web promotion (hourlong episodes for easy download or something)... maybe that'd help?

Foolish Mortal
10-29-2007, 07:32 PM
I think it would probably only run a couple of years before a network would decide not to renew it.
That's exactly how long Amazing Stories lasted.


Amazing Stories was 20 years ago. Not saying they'd far any better now, per se... but it is different audiences we're talking about now.

And I dunno, if you could somehow tie in some kind of web promotion (hourlong episodes for easy download or something)... maybe that'd help?
Networks have tried anthology shows since then, and still failed.

Gunter
10-29-2007, 07:41 PM
That's exactly how long Amazing Stories lasted.


Yeah. :)

I was making a joke because in his post it sounded almost as if he'd never heard of Amazing Stories.

chess
10-29-2007, 09:09 PM
There is only one person who came to mind: M. Night Shyamalan

I was thinking the same thing.

I think he would be great at hosting and producing this type of program.

(akaRyanHoffman)
10-29-2007, 09:17 PM
Hmm...Y'know, typically I think tv is more a writer's medium.

Now what writers could carry a "_______ Presents" type anthology?