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Shannon Chenoweth
07-05-2007, 05:14 PM
I just read some awesome books recently about writing and creativity. "Wild Mind" by Natalie Goldberg, "Tao of Writing" by Ralph Wahlstrom, "Creativity" by Osho and "Bird by Bird" by Anne Lamott.
I was really into the Osho book, he had some real interesting things to say about the mind and ego. I'm going to look for more of his books. And, Goldberg's stuff is great. I'm about to dive into "Writing Down the Bones."

What are some of your favorite books on writing and creativity? Have you read anything new that really inspired you on your craft?

YouStayClassy
07-05-2007, 05:21 PM
http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/51CJ57YP1CL._SS500_.jpg

Crucify me for such a mainstream and non-cool kid choice, but this really is a phenomenal book I still read every few months.

Shannon Chenoweth
07-05-2007, 05:39 PM
I've got that and will read it soon. I just have so many books I want to read. :)

Dark Sasha
07-05-2007, 05:42 PM
I don't believe in them, frankly.

xyzzy
07-05-2007, 05:45 PM
I've read Bird by Bird by Lamott and I enjoyed it.

Marc Lombardi
07-05-2007, 05:48 PM
http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/51CJ57YP1CL._SS500_.jpg

Crucify me for such a mainstream and non-cool kid choice, but this really is a phenomenal book I still read every few months.

Agreed 100%

Also -- Strunk & White's "The Elements of Style" just to learn basic grammar and style. It should be a staple for all shorts of writers.

Jef UK
07-05-2007, 05:52 PM
I read Bird By Bird as an assignment for a class.

As a writer, I have no interest in reading books about writing.

haloJONES
07-05-2007, 05:59 PM
I've heard good things about this book.
story by robert mcKee

paperback ...... .................................................. .... ..............or hardcover


http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/41G92VCM7NL._SS500_.jpghttp://images.amazon.com/images/P/0060391685.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

Shannon Chenoweth
07-05-2007, 06:19 PM
I don't believe in them, frankly.

Here's the thing, good writing books don't tell you or give you rules. They encourage you along your journey. This is why I enjoyed Tao of Writing and like Goldberg's books. Very zen. :)

Mr. E!
07-05-2007, 06:30 PM
I like The Writer's Handbook. It is an annual book that runs to the practical, with names and contact numbers of agents and publishers, but every edition has a plethora of articles from writers about the craft.

Mister Mets
07-05-2007, 06:33 PM
http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/51CJ57YP1CL._SS500_.jpg

Crucify me for such a mainstream and non-cool kid choice, but this really is a phenomenal book I still read every few months.
It is exceptional.

James Patrick
07-05-2007, 06:43 PM
That Stephen King book could be his finest work. There's no shame in recommending it.

Coincidentally (not ironically!), I went to Borders tonight to get the hardback of Story for my library, and I actually looked at every book recommended in this thread. Bird by Bird looked the most interesting and I wondered what it's focus was.

Kody
07-05-2007, 07:01 PM
Crafty Screenwriting by Alex Epstein is a fantastic book, i've read that one several times. As much as I wanted to like Story by McKee (and I know a lot of people really love it), I just found it to be non applicable. I don't know anything about McKee, but the book read like it was written by a story critic, not a story writer. King's On Writing was great, but I found it was mostly about him, and the way he writes. That's cool, and I realy enjoyed the book, but I don't think it made me a better writer. Lawrence Block has several fantastic books on writing and I've found them all very practical and informative. The book called Writers on Comic Scriptwriting has a ton of great little tips and techniques by guys like Neil Gaiman, Frank Miller, Peter David, Mark Waid, Grant Morrison, Chuck Dixon, etc. It's edited by Mark Salisbury.

YouStayClassy
07-05-2007, 07:02 PM
The book called Writers on Comic Scriptwriting has a ton of great little tips and techniques by guys like Neil Gaiman, Frank Miller, Peter David, Mark Waid, Grant Morrison, Chuck Dixon, etc. It's edited by Mark Salisbury.

Ooh! Now that sounds awesome.

Patton
07-05-2007, 07:03 PM
Ooh! Now that sounds awesome.

There's two of them. They're both very good.

BJLG
07-05-2007, 07:51 PM
The first half (60%) of Stephen King's On Writing is about his own journey as a writer, as well as the things which inspired him and influenced his work...
But it is the second portion that chronicles his technique and is valuable to the aspiring author (any book that reveals what is to be learned by reading lousy books is pretty honest about the craft).

I'd also recommend McKee's Story in audio form. The previously posted opinion that it is more about criticizing story than it is about writing is true--and is exactly McKee's point: that the education of the various storytelling mediums, regardless of medium or any specific genre, has lost the fundamental structure of how to simply tell a story.
McKee won't tell you how to write, but he'll open your eyes to all of the fascinating ways there are to simply tell a compelling, engaging story whether you're a novelist, playwright, teleplay author, screenwriter, or in keeping with the theme of this board, a comic script writer.

James Patrick
07-05-2007, 08:03 PM
Ooh! Now that sounds awesome.

It's really good. Very isightful, but since it goes through writers, the only thing that connects it all is the tips and it's never goes deep into anything.

TonyFleecs
07-05-2007, 08:06 PM
I'm in the middle of 3 of them... well, in the middle of one in the first 10th of the other 2. Peter David's book, Lawrence Block's WRITING THE NOVEL and McKee's STORY (which people tell me not to read but I tell them I don't know structure so fuck it).

Chris McCarver
07-05-2007, 08:43 PM
PAD's Writing for Comics.
Jeffrey Scott's How to Write for Animation.
JMS' Complete Guide to Scriptwriting.

spencerdidyrmom
07-06-2007, 08:32 AM
http://www.avatarpress.com/writingforcomics/wfcv1gn.jpg

JoshuaFialkov
07-06-2007, 08:43 AM
I third the Lawrence Block books.

And, the only book on writing I reread regularly is actually not about writing per se.

Making Movies by Sydney Lumet
http://www.amazon.com/Making-Movies-Sidney-Lumet/dp/0679756604/ref=sr_1_1/105-2284238-4212401?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1183740160&sr=8-1

Especially for comic writing, I don't know that there's anything better to educate a comic's writer.

PeteL
07-06-2007, 08:52 AM
These are the two that I'm working on:

About Writing. (http://www.amazon.com/About-Writing-Essays-Letters-Interviews/dp/0819567167)

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0819567167.01._SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg

The Writer's Journey, 2nd Edition. (http://www.amazon.com/Writers-Journey-Second-Mythic-Structure/dp/0941188701/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/103-7534591-3371009?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1183740548&sr=1-1)

http://www.offstagebooks.com/Covers/25.jpg

JoshuaFialkov
07-06-2007, 08:55 AM
Oh, and I highly recommend getting a subscription to Writer's Digest. It's a great introductory magazine to the world of being a professional writer.

http://www.writersdigest.com/

chess
07-06-2007, 08:58 AM
I've read Bird by Bird by Lamott and I enjoyed it.

Thanks... I am going to add this to my "read pile". This book looks interesting.

chess
07-06-2007, 09:00 AM
I live in the suburbs and have reviewed their courses for a long time. I would like to take some courses here.

This is not a degree program. This is a "for fun" program.

http://www.feltre.org/default.jsp

Shannon Chenoweth
07-06-2007, 04:11 PM
James, Bird by Bird is very much about being confident in yourself and explores the struggles and experiences Anne has had. Jealousy is explored, writing groups, etc. It really is about life as a writer. I'm on the last 30 or so pages of it now. I have enjoyed it. There is nothing about "rules" or the like which I know some folks dislike.

Shannon Chenoweth
07-06-2007, 04:12 PM
Oh, and I highly recommend getting a subscription to Writer's Digest. It's a great introductory magazine to the world of being a professional writer.

http://www.writersdigest.com/

I have one, and I'm about to subscribe to The Writer as well since I read that regularly too. Both great magazines.

Shannon Chenoweth
07-06-2007, 04:13 PM
These are the two that I'm working on:

About Writing. (http://www.amazon.com/About-Writing-Essays-Letters-Interviews/dp/0819567167)

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0819567167.01._SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg

The Writer's Journey, 2nd Edition. (http://www.amazon.com/Writers-Journey-Second-Mythic-Structure/dp/0941188701/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/103-7534591-3371009?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1183740548&sr=1-1)

http://www.offstagebooks.com/Covers/25.jpg

I have seen the Journey book and wondered how it was. Let me know what you think about it. Never heard of that first one though. Looks interesting.

Shannon Chenoweth
07-06-2007, 04:15 PM
I'd also recommend McKee's Story in audio form. The previously posted opinion that it is more about criticizing story than it is about writing is true--and is exactly McKee's point: that the education of the various storytelling mediums, regardless of medium or any specific genre, has lost the fundamental structure of how to simply tell a story.
McKee won't tell you how to write, but he'll open your eyes to all of the fascinating ways there are to simply tell a compelling, engaging story whether you're a novelist, playwright, teleplay author, screenwriter, or in keeping with the theme of this board, a comic script writer.

I agree with everything you said here Bryan. I've got STORY in both hardcover and in audio and I love them both. I listened to the audio after reading the book and got a lot out of it.