PDA

View Full Version : first 5 pages of I Killed Adolf Hitler by Jason



Jacob Lyon Goddard
07-03-2007, 11:38 AM
http://brokenfrontier.com/headlines/details.php?id=3095

http://brokenfrontier.com/img/2007/jul/IKAHITLcvr.jpg
http://brokenfrontier.com/img/2007/jul/IKAHITLp1.jpg
http://brokenfrontier.com/img/2007/jul/IKAHITLp2.jpg
http://brokenfrontier.com/img/2007/jul/IKAHITLp3.jpg
http://brokenfrontier.com/img/2007/jul/IKAHITLp4.jpg
http://brokenfrontier.com/img/2007/jul/IKAHITLp5.jpg

Blake Sims
07-03-2007, 11:39 AM
Oh my GOD I cant wait to read this!!

JABSEN
07-03-2007, 11:40 AM
Yay!

mario
07-03-2007, 11:54 AM
I love Jason!

Donal DeLay
07-03-2007, 11:57 AM
Wow, that looks kinda awesome.

Ziolko
07-03-2007, 12:01 PM
Fantastic! :D

bradical
07-03-2007, 12:02 PM
nice.

Dark Sasha
07-03-2007, 12:03 PM
Super duper awesome to the extreme!

kylethoreau
07-03-2007, 12:11 PM
I like, when's this due to come out?

Michael John Wheeler
07-03-2007, 12:14 PM
:d

:D

Buk Was Right
07-03-2007, 12:14 PM
Has that been solicited already? Is it out? Do you have a Diamond order code handy.

I want to make sure I don't miss it.

Patton
07-03-2007, 12:14 PM
I like, when's this due to come out?

End of July some time.

I'm on a huge Jason kick right now. Only 2 more books of his to read. His American books anyway. So I'm pumped for this. But for some reason, more pumped for The Last Musketeer.

I also love that the germ for this book was planted in You Can't Get There From Here.

t00lverine
07-03-2007, 12:18 PM
This looks really great. I'll have to get this book.

Blake Sims
07-03-2007, 12:23 PM
Everyone who hasnt already do yourself a favor and get The Left Bank Gang.




http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b113/seanmaher1/the-left-bank-gang.jpg

F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Ezra Pound, and James Joyce walk into a Parisian bar… no, it’s not the beginning of a joke, but the premise of Jason’s unique new graphic novel. Set in 1920s Paris, The Left Bank Gang is a deliciously inventive re-imagining of these four literary figures as not only typical Jason anthropomorphics, but…graphic novelists! Yes, in Jason’s warped world, cartooning is the dominant form of fiction, and not only do these four work literary giants work in the comics medium but they get together to discuss pen vs. brush, chat about the latest graphic novels from Dostoevsky (“I can’t tell any of his characters apart!”) to Faulkner (“Hasn’t he heard of white space? His panels are too crowded!”), and bemoan their erratic careers. With guest appearances by Zelda Fitzgerald and Jean-Paul Sartre, and a few remarkable twists and turns along the way, and you’ve got one of the funniest and most playful graphic novels of the year. Like Jason’s acclaimed Why Are You Doing This?, The Left Bank Gang is rendered in full spectacular color.


It's my favorite book of Jason's.

Donal DeLay
07-03-2007, 12:27 PM
Everyone who hasnt already do yourself a favor and get The Left Bank Gang.





It's my favorite book of Jason's.
HA! Is that what it's about? I always see that book at my LCS and I've heard great things about Jason and wanted to pick that up, but something else usually catches my eye that I want more.

After Goddard endorsing it, and the plot you just wrote I'm definitely getting that. Sounds great.

Blake Sims
07-03-2007, 12:31 PM
HA! Is that what it's about? I always see that book at my LCS and I've heard great things about Jason and wanted to pick that up, but something else usually catches my eye that I want more.

After Goddard endorsing it, and the plot you just wrote I'm definitely getting that. Sounds great.

I didnt actually write it, got it off Fantagraphics site.

But yeah that's it basically. It's a heist story starring Hemingway, Pound, Fitzgerald, and Joyce.

It's brilliant.

Bill Nolan
07-03-2007, 12:39 PM
I don't know... It looks interesting, but I tend to throw up a little in my mouth any time I spend over $10 for a 48-page comic...

Blake Sims
07-03-2007, 12:43 PM
I don't know... It looks interesting, but I tend to throw up a little in my mouth any time I spend over $10 for a 48-page comic...

His books while pricey I will admit, are worth every cent.

Jacob Lyon Goddard
07-03-2007, 12:44 PM
I don't know... It looks interesting, but I tend to throw up a little in my mouth any time I spend over $10 for a 48-page comic...

if you line up 3 comics written by Bendis, it will cost you more than 10 dollars
and this one comic will take you 5 times longer to read
and you'll get a complete story

Rosemary's Baby
07-03-2007, 12:47 PM
Can't wait to read that.

Bill Nolan
07-03-2007, 12:48 PM
I almost cried when I finished reading "The Professor's Daughter" and realized I'd spent $16.95 for a 60-page comic. Tainted the experience just a tad. It was a beautiful, amazing book, but it was probably the most expensive comic, on a price-per-page basis, that I have ever purchased. $13 for 48 pages comes very close to that, and the artwork doesn't look nearly as nice.

Bill Nolan
07-03-2007, 12:49 PM
if you line up 3 comics written by Bendis, it will cost you more than 10 dollars
and this one comic will take you 5 times longer to read
and you'll get a complete story

I'll give you the second part, but three Marvel comics, coming in at 66 pages of story, will cost me less than $9. Yes, they will suck, apples and oranges and all that, just sayin'.

Blake Sims
07-03-2007, 12:51 PM
I almost cried when I finished reading "The Professor's Daughter" and realized I'd spent $16.95 for a 60-page comic. Tainted the experience just a tad. It was a beautiful, amazing book, but it was probably the most expensive comic, on a price-per-page basis, that I have ever purchased. $13 for 48 pages comes very close to that, and the artwork doesn't look nearly as nice.

It may not be for you but Jason is a fucking master. His lines are so clean. I envy his skills tremendously.

Donal DeLay
07-03-2007, 01:07 PM
Sometimes good product is worth the price.

And to experience great art, and great stories you can't be a tightwad or you're just going to limit yourself to cheap corporate repetition.

Blake Sims
07-03-2007, 01:08 PM
Sometimes good product is worth the price.

And to experience great art, and great stories you can't be a tightwad or you're just going to limit yourself to cheap corporate repetition.

Huzzah!

Rosemary's Baby
07-03-2007, 01:11 PM
It's the same with DVD's. Criterion puts out a lot of great films you can't get anywhere else, but you're going to pay more than average for them. Of course, you could always rent them.

I'll definitely pick up this book when it comes out. It's one of the more interesting ideas I've heard in months in the realm of comics.

Patton
07-03-2007, 01:16 PM
It's the same with DVD's. Criterion puts out a lot of great films you can't get anywhere else, but you're going to pay more than average for them. Of course, you could always rent them.

I'll definitely pick up this book when it comes out. It's one of the more interesting ideas I've heard in months in the realm of comics.

If you like horror you should check out his silent zombie book, The Living and the Dead.

Rosemary's Baby
07-03-2007, 01:20 PM
If you like horror you should check out his silent zombie book, The Living and the Dead.

I just found this on amazon. I was looking to see whatelse he had done. All his books sound good. I'm thinking about ordering two of them.

Patton
07-03-2007, 01:22 PM
I just found this on amazon. I was looking to see whatelse he had done. All his books sound good. I'm thinking about ordering two of them.

Awesome. Which two?

I can give you snippets on most of them if you need. The only two I haven't read are The Iron Wagon and Shhhh.

andrew french
07-03-2007, 01:29 PM
god i need thisss

Rosemary's Baby
07-03-2007, 01:36 PM
Awesome. Which two?

I can give you snippets on most of them if you need. The only two I haven't read are The Iron Wagon and Shhhh.

Which two would you recommend?

"Why are you doing this?" and "Tell me something" are looking mighty appealing.

Corey
07-03-2007, 01:38 PM
That looks amazing! First I've heard of it. Can't wait!

I love people being killed all around him as he casually walks down the street.

Patton
07-03-2007, 01:42 PM
Which two would you recommend?

"Why are you doing this?" and "Tell me something" are looking mighty appealing.

Honestly, they're all fantastic.

Why Are You Doing This? is a Hitchcockian thriller.

Tell Me Something is a great love story with an exceptional use of flashbacks.

You Can't Get There From Here is a love triangle/quad thing focusing on Frankenstein, Frankenstein's monster, and Frankenstein's henchmen like characters.

The Living and the Dead is like a Buster Keaton zombie movie. It's set in the 20's (or somewhere in there) and has title cards like a silent movie and everything. It's also a love story.

Hey Wait... is about two childhood pals and a tragedy.

Left Bank Gang was mentioned above and is probably his "best" work.

Overall, if I had to spend money on two...I'd say The Living and the Dead for his silent, b/w stuff and Why Are You Doing This? for his wordy, color stuff are good places to start.

Sorry for the long post...he's my favorite cartoonist right now.

mario
07-03-2007, 02:04 PM
I almost cried when I finished reading "The Professor's Daughter" and realized I'd spent $16.95 for a 60-page comic. Tainted the experience just a tad. It was a beautiful, amazing book, but it was probably the most expensive comic, on a price-per-page basis, that I have ever purchased. $13 for 48 pages comes very close to that, and the artwork doesn't look nearly as nice.

that's the regular price for hardcovers here.

Greenville 90210
07-03-2007, 02:15 PM
Thanks for posting this. I've never heard of it and only read a couple short stories by Jason. This looks great. I like his style a lot.

Patton
07-03-2007, 02:18 PM
Thanks for posting this. I've never heard of it and only read a couple short stories by Jason. This looks great. I like his style a lot.

Which short stories? I've been trying to track some down but haven't been able to.

Greenville 90210
07-03-2007, 02:23 PM
Which short stories? I've been trying to track some down but haven't been able to.

One was in an anthology of some sort. I can't remember the title. I can look it up when I get home (@work).

Jacob Lyon Goddard
07-03-2007, 02:56 PM
If you like horror you should check out his silent zombie book, The Living and the Dead.

my favorite zombie thing

finally gave me the answer to the question "what would i do if Mary was a zombie"

jason hissong
07-03-2007, 03:35 PM
i hope this will be at chicago because it looks awesome.

Genius J
07-03-2007, 03:51 PM
I want this!

I only have read "Why Are You Doing This?" I thought it was great.

I'd buy them all if I could afford to drop a couple hundred bucks on books.

Patton
07-03-2007, 03:56 PM
I want this!

I only have read "Why Are You Doing This?" I thought it was great.

I'd buy them all if I could afford to drop a couple hundred bucks on books.

I ordered 8 from amazon marketplace for about 40 bucks total on my amazon card.

Genius J
07-03-2007, 04:09 PM
Does Jason have a web site?

Thomas Mauer
07-03-2007, 04:14 PM
Wow!

Jacob Lyon Goddard
07-03-2007, 04:16 PM
Does Jason have a web site?

probably
but i doubt it's in English

Patton
07-03-2007, 04:29 PM
Does Jason have a web site?

http://www.mjaumjau.net/

But it doesn't seem to be working anymore/right now.

Bill Nolan
07-03-2007, 06:18 PM
that's the regular price for hardcovers here.

This is a regular-sized softcover, and the Professor's Daughter book I mentioned for $16.95 is a digest-sized softcover. Foreign stuff always gets shrunk way down by the time we get it... :sad:

Patton
07-03-2007, 06:49 PM
This is a regular-sized softcover, and the Professor's Daughter book I mentioned for $16.95 is a digest-sized softcover. Foreign stuff always gets shrunk way down by the time we get it... :sad:
I hadn't realized that. I wonder if Jason's stuff is bigger in it's many other languages and countries.

Jacob Lyon Goddard
07-03-2007, 07:14 PM
This is a regular-sized softcover, and the Professor's Daughter book I mentioned for $16.95 is a digest-sized softcover. Foreign stuff always gets shrunk way down by the time we get it... :sad:

if this book is like the other Jason comics here in America through Fantagraphics, it's of a "standard" size
whatever that is

Patton
07-03-2007, 07:22 PM
if this book is like the other Jason comics here in America through Fantagraphics, it's of a "standard" size
whatever that is

Isn't that what he said with his first 6 words? I'm lost.

Jacob Lyon Goddard
07-03-2007, 07:23 PM
Isn't that what he said with his first 6 words? I'm lost.

me too

but i can't read
what's your excuse?

Mylazycat
07-03-2007, 07:27 PM
I love Jason. I must have this!

Patton
07-03-2007, 07:31 PM
me too

but i can't read
what's your excuse?

drugs?

AAlgar
07-03-2007, 07:34 PM
So, um...

...

...why's everyone a dog?

Patton
07-03-2007, 07:36 PM
So, um...

...

...why's everyone a dog?

Are they? Hadn't noticed.

Jacob Lyon Goddard
07-03-2007, 07:39 PM
So, um...

...

...why's everyone a dog?

they're all different animals
it's called Anthropomorphism
made popular (in the western world) through 19th century fiction and later through 20th century animated films and shorts

AAlgar
07-03-2007, 07:43 PM
they're all different animals
it's called Anthropomorphism
made popular (in the western world) through 19th century fiction and later through 20th century animated films and shorts

Okay, so... without us degrading into the usual "I think your comics are pretentious" / "I think you're too stupid to appreciate it" BS, can you explain to me why that particular device is being used here? Is it meant to symbolize something? Is it weird just for the sake of being weird (which would not be a criticism)?

Icaruss
07-03-2007, 07:46 PM
That was awesome.

Patton
07-03-2007, 07:46 PM
Okay, so... without us degrading into the usual "I think your comics are pretentious" / "I think you're too stupid to appreciate it" BS, can you explain to me why that particular device is being used here? Is it meant to symbolize something? Is it weird just for the sake of being weird (which would not be a criticism)?

This is his style...he's done all his stuff like this since 95 or so. It's just his style.

I don't know how to phrase this next part without sounding like I'm being combative, but I'm genuinely curious...do you see Mickey Mouse or Donald Duck or Bugs Bunny as weird for the sake of being weird?

Jacob Lyon Goddard
07-03-2007, 07:48 PM
Okay, so... without us degrading into the usual "I think your comics are pretentious" / "I think you're too stupid to appreciate it" BS, can you explain to me why that particular device is being used here? Is it meant to symbolize something? Is it weird just for the sake of being weird (which would not be a criticism)?

it's a thematic element through all (or at least most) of Jason's work
i'm assume it's a means of tapping into what Scott McCloud called "self projecting into the simplified" where we as humans find it easier to step into the shoes of comic characters the simpler and more universal they are depicted. something that's traced all the way back to the Greek's non-specific human sculptures of their gods and heroes

essencially, the simpler and nondescript a drawn character is, the easier it is for us to relate to (unless that character happens to look exactly like us)

or Jason grew up on Carl Barks Uncle Scrooge comics
either/or

AAlgar
07-03-2007, 07:50 PM
This is his style...he's done all his stuff like this since 95 or so. It's just his style.

I don't know how to phrase this next part without sounding like I'm being combative, but I'm genuinely curious...do you see Mickey Mouse or Donald Duck or Bugs Bunny as weird for the sake of being weird?

Well, no. But if I were seeing them now, for the first time, as an adult, I might stop and think about why they are what they are. Easier to accept that sort of thing at face value when you're a kid, I guess.

But I don't think the question is out of line for a comic that Goddard (and many of the other people in this thread) professes to be a fan of. I'm curious if there's some deeper meaning there.

AAlgar
07-03-2007, 07:52 PM
it's a thematic element through all (or at least most) of Jason's work
i'm assume it's a means of tapping into what Scott McCloud called "self projecting into the simplified" where we as humans find it easier to step into the shoes of comic characters the simpler and more universal they are depicted. something that's traced all the way back to the Greek's non-specific human sculptures of their gods and heroes

essencially, the simpler and nondescript a drawn character is, the easier it is for us to relate to (unless that character happens to look exactly like us)

or Jason grew up on Carl Barks Uncle Scrooge comics
either/or

Yeah. I get all that.

I was just curious if there was any deeper meaning here. Why animals, and not anthropomorphic teapots and dishes like in Beauty and the Beast?

Jacob Lyon Goddard
07-03-2007, 07:52 PM
Well, no. But if I were seeing them now, for the first time, as an adult, I might stop and think about why they are what they are. Easier to accept that sort of thing at face value when you're a kid, I guess.

But I don't think the question is out of line for a comic that Goddard (and many of the other people in this thread) professes to be a fan of. I'm curious if there's some deeper meaning there.

you know how Jim Lee puts way too much shading under all his male characters cheekbones?
and how Liefeld puts too many teeth in their mouths?
Jason draws all his characters with vaguely animalist heads

AAlgar
07-03-2007, 07:54 PM
you know how Jim Lee puts way too much shading under all his male characters cheekbones?
and how Liefeld puts too many teeth in their mouths?
Jason draws all his characters with vaguely animalist heads

I'm no fan of either of those artists.

I was really hoping we could do this without you being condescending about it.

Jacob Lyon Goddard
07-03-2007, 07:56 PM
I'm no fan of either of those artists.

I was really hoping we could do this without you being condescending about it.

didn't mean to be
wasn't aware of your opinions towards Liefeld or Lee

AAlgar
07-03-2007, 08:02 PM
didn't mean to be
wasn't aware of your opinions towards Liefeld or Lee

I meant more the previous response. I get the concept of anthropomorphism and simple figures.

I thought that, since it seems to be a silly, made-for-kids thing on the surface, it couldn't possibly only be that. That there had to be some deeper meaning there. Otherwise it's just silly and childish.

And who wants to read comics like that?

Patton
07-03-2007, 08:02 PM
Well, no. But if I were seeing them now, for the first time, as an adult, I might stop and think about why they are what they are. Easier to accept that sort of thing at face value when you're a kid, I guess.

But I don't think the question is out of line for a comic that Goddard (and many of the other people in this thread) professes to be a fan of. I'm curious if there's some deeper meaning there.

Nah, it's not out of line. I was just curious. I'd be fascinated by someone that was creeped out by Mickey Mouse or thought it was strange for him to exist. It sort of is, but we all just accept it, like you say.

I just view it as a style...a lot of indie people do it. I think Jason does it because it's simpler and cleaner looking. He said he wasn't happy with his work when he did humans. Seeing his self portrait, I could see that. It's not the same really.

Jacob Lyon Goddard
07-03-2007, 08:17 PM
I meant more the previous response. I get the concept of anthropomorphism and simple figures.

I thought that, since it seems to be a silly, made-for-kids thing on the surface, it couldn't possibly only be that. That there had to be some deeper meaning there. Otherwise it's just silly and childish.

And who wants to read comics like that?

it has the elements of a childrens books because most readers find it accessable, it has a comfort to it.
Jason's certainly not alone
i mentioned Carl Barks before
same with Dave Sim, Art Spegielman, or Robert Crumb

it's also easier to project emotions through non-human faces
look at Maus, an all animalistic cast showing the widest range of emotions comics have ever seen, yet you don't realize until later readings that almost never do any of the characters show any facial expressions at all

AAlgar
07-03-2007, 08:30 PM
it has the elements of a childrens books because most readers find it accessable, it has a comfort to it.
Jason's certainly not alone
i mentioned Carl Barks before
same with Dave Sim, Art Spegielman, or Robert Crumb

it's also easier to project emotions through non-human faces
look at Maus, an all animalistic cast showing the widest range of emotions comics have ever seen, yet you don't realize until later readings that almost never do any of the characters show any facial expressions at all

I actually found Maus a bit inacessible for exactly that reason. I just couldn't take the subject matter seriously when I was looking at cartoon cats and mice. I admit that's a very shallow reaction to a fairly superficial aspect of the book, but no more so than the way some people see capes and tights and write a book of as childish.

And by "some people" I'm not implying you. I'll admit that you do look further than that. I don't agree with your opinions pretty much ever, but I haven't seen you make judgments like that.

Jacob Lyon Goddard
07-03-2007, 08:33 PM
I actually found Maus a bit inacessible for exactly that reason. I just couldn't take the subject matter seriously when I was looking at cartoon cats and mice. I admit that's a very shallow reaction to a fairly superficial aspect of the book, but no more so than the way some people see capes and tights and write a book of as childish.

And by "some people" I'm not implying you. I'll admit that you do look further than that. I don't agree with your opinions pretty much ever, but I haven't seen you make judgments like that.

hey
Watchman kicked ass

Hock
07-03-2007, 10:41 PM
Pretty awesome, could use more Starscream though.