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spencerdidyrmom
07-03-2007, 07:55 AM
Right now I'm reading Michael Chabon's The Yiddish Policeman's Union which is good. I would have finished it by now, but I've been distracted by comics some. I also recently finished Murakami's Kafka On The Shore and Lethem's Fortress Of Solitude. Kafka was good, but one character really ruined it for me. Made me feel like I was watching a really good TV show with a horrible actor for the lead. But Fortress Of Solitude was fantastic and has me anticipating Lethem's Omega that he's doing with Farel Darymple.

I'm also reading/using an instructional art book that Kubert put out. Its good, but not as good as Giordano's in terms of useful information. Sure looks pretty though.

What's everyone else reading and what do you recommend?

DAVE
07-03-2007, 08:02 AM
About to finish The Tender Bar by JR Moeringer. It's the best book I've read since The Fortress of Solitude.

Shane W
07-03-2007, 08:03 AM
I'm almost finished with A Long Way Gone the memoirs of a boy soldier. It's good.

Gregory
07-03-2007, 08:04 AM
Just finished Cell by Stephen King. Skip it; pick up his older horror for a better read.

Buk Was Right
07-03-2007, 08:05 AM
Just finished Galapagos by Vonnegut on my way to work.

Next up is either Rant or The Road.

TheKraken
07-03-2007, 08:06 AM
I am reading... a Warcraft novel. :lol: But it's good.

I just finished Peter F. Hamilton's Fallen Dragon, which turned out to be an extremely dense, realistic and well-thought out sci fi novel set in a future where humans have colonized other planets and Earth corporations invade the colonies to pillage resources, telling the tale of the invasion of this particular planet being met with an powerful resistance movement. Haven't been reading much lately... even comics are rarely getting read on Wednesdays...

Jacob Lyon Goddard
07-03-2007, 08:06 AM
Been picking away at Gravity's Rainbow for what feels like forever

thatguyfromsyracuse
07-03-2007, 08:07 AM
I'm in the middle of reading Rant right now, but keep getting side-tracked. Next up is a book on Houdini.

Blane
07-03-2007, 08:10 AM
I'm reading White Night, the newest Dresden book. Just finished up Day Watch.

Why is it that contemporary fiction that was originally released in languages other than English can't get a good translation?

Dusto
07-03-2007, 08:11 AM
Right now I'm reading Michael Chabon's The Yiddish Policeman's Union which is good. I would have finished it by now, but I've been distracted by comics some. I also recently finished Murakami's Kafka On The Shore and Lethem's Fortress Of Solitude. Kafka was good, but one character really ruined it for me. Made me feel like I was watching a really good TV show with a horrible actor for the lead. But Fortress Of Solitude was fantastic and has me anticipating Lethem's Omega that he's doing with Farel Darymple.

I'm also reading/using an instructional art book that Kubert put out. Its good, but not as good as Giordano's in terms of useful information. Sure looks pretty though.

What's everyone else reading and what do you recommend?


If you like Lethem and Murakami, and snowy detective stories, I recommend Icelander (http://www.amazon.com/Icelander-Dustin-Long/dp/0802143202/ref=ed_oe_p/105-3774486-6074868?ie=UTF8&qid=1156026409&sr=8-1), by Dustin Long.

Dusto
07-03-2007, 08:12 AM
Been picking away at Gravity's Rainbow for what feels like forever

Keep at it, it's worth it. But if you need a breather, read The Crying of Lot 49, which is good and a lot easier and will renew your Pynchon devotion.

Buk Was Right
07-03-2007, 08:16 AM
Been picking away at Gravity's Rainbow for what feels like forever

Heh... me too.

I started it, really liked what I was reading, but realized that I had no earthly idea what was going on... I'm going to try again, but not this week.

PeteL
07-03-2007, 08:41 AM
As I Lay Dying.

And a re-read of The Man In The High Castle.

Jacob Lyon Goddard
07-03-2007, 08:42 AM
Keep at it, it's worth it. But if you need a breather, read The Crying of Lot 49, which is good and a lot easier and will renew your Pynchon devotion.

i'd be happy with some kind of Cliffnotes that i don't have to read off of a computer screen

GelfXIII
07-03-2007, 08:43 AM
Right now I'm reading Michael Chabon's The Yiddish Policeman's Union which is good. I would have finished it by now, but I've been distracted by comics some. I also recently finished Murakami's Kafka On The Shore and Lethem's Fortress Of Solitude. Kafka was good, but one character really ruined it for me. Made me feel like I was watching a really good TV show with a horrible actor for the lead. But Fortress Of Solitude was fantastic and has me anticipating Lethem's Omega that he's doing with Farel Darymple.

I'm also reading/using an instructional art book that Kubert put out. Its good, but not as good as Giordano's in terms of useful information. Sure looks pretty though.

What's everyone else reading and what do you recommend?

I just finished the Chabon book. Excellent read, but I felt like I needed a reference book sitting next to me for a lot of it, and I even have some yiddish! :lol:

MIKE D
07-03-2007, 08:47 AM
I just finished a reread of CATCH-22.

I'm about to start Henry Roth's CALL IT SLEEP, and I'm bringing THE ZOMBIE SURVIVAL GUIDE to the beach over the next two days.

Jef UK
07-03-2007, 08:48 AM
I'm almost finished with Gilbert Sorrentino's Crystal Vision, and will be reading Dostoevsky's Demons or the new Chabon book next.

Jacob Lyon Goddard
07-03-2007, 08:50 AM
I'm bringing THE ZOMBIE SURVIVAL GUIDE to the beach over the next two days.

Mary's been reading the copy i swiped from Oeming and loving every page.
look for a HiddenRobot column on it (and zombies in general) in the near future

Jef UK
07-03-2007, 08:51 AM
i'd be happy with some kind of Cliffnotes that i don't have to read off of a computer screen

I'm positive Gravity's Rainbow has published annotations.

Here's one: http://www.amazon.com/Gravitys-Rainbow-Companion-Contexts-Pynchons/dp/0820328073/ref=pd_bbs_sr_4/102-0921163-8971362?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1183481424&sr=8-4

Go to the library, there's more I'm sure.

MIKE D
07-03-2007, 08:52 AM
Mary's been reading the copy i swiped from Oeming and loving every page.
look for a HiddenRobot column on it (and zombies in general) in the near future

Cool. On a side note, the wife and I caught a David Sedaris live a few months back, and every time he tours he recommends a book from a different author to his audience. This tour's recommendation was THE ZOMBIE SURVIVAL GUIDE. Turns out he loves the zombie genre and thinks the book is brilliant.

THWIP!
07-03-2007, 08:55 AM
I finished reading Whack a Mole by Chris Grabenstein. I'm reading Dirty Martini by J.A. Konrath. I've got I Am Legend coming up and some Chuck Klosterman books.

Tuco
07-03-2007, 09:05 AM
recently finished (whats out that is) both of jim buther's series Codex Alera and the Dresden Files (both were excellent cant wait for more) and i'm in the middle of 1984 (yeah i know i should have read it by now). i have I am Legend, Earth Abides, and American Gods in the mail from amazon (hopfully here by Thurs).
-RAZ

Tuco
07-03-2007, 09:06 AM
Just finished Galapagos by Vonnegut on my way to work.

Next up is either Rant or The Road.

the road was excellent, one of the best books i've ever read. i think it deserves 2 pulitzers.
-RAZ

Tuco
07-03-2007, 09:07 AM
Been picking away at Gravity's Rainbow for what feels like forever

i feel ya man, i tried starting this book 3 times and never got more than 50 pages in. stupid bananas.
-RAZ

iGotKittyPryde
07-03-2007, 09:10 AM
I just finished JPod by Douglas Coupland which was pretty good.

Lately I've read: Klosterman IV, Assasination Vacation by Sarah Vowell, As I Climbed Across the Table and You Don't Love Me Yet by Lethem, The Reluctant Fundamentalist by Mohsin Hamad (which was pretty fantastic), Special Topics in Calamity Physics by Marissa Pressl (which was also fantastic) and Rant by Chuck Palahniuk

I tried reading the Yiddish Police, but I just couldn't get into it. A large part of it was due to the yiddish that was used and never explained what any of it meant. I mostly could get what was meant through what was said otherwise but it was a major annoyance.

Jacob Lyon Goddard
07-03-2007, 09:10 AM
i feel ya man, i tried starting this book 3 times and never got more than 50 pages in. stupid bananas.
-RAZ

i have that problem with Naked Lunch
started it maybe 5 times, each time getting maybe 30-50 pages farther in
i'm probably one try away from finishing it
if i ever finish Gravity's Rainbow

Bryan H
07-03-2007, 09:18 AM
Just today bought 'House of Leaves' by Mark Z. Danielewski and 'On the Road' by Jack Kerouac. Debating on which to crack open first, but Leaves is... an odd book, to say the least. Also tried picking up 'The Astonishing Adventures of Fanboy and Goth Girl' after reading the Newsarama article, but learned it won't be out till Sept. Could have sworn it was already released, ah well.

Before today though, I had just finished the complete Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

MIKE D
07-03-2007, 09:30 AM
Just today bought 'House of Leaves' by Mark Z. Danielewski and 'On the Road' by Jack Kerouac. Debating on which to crack open first, but Leaves is... an odd book, to say the least. Also tried picking up 'The Astonishing Adventures of Fanboy and Goth Girl' after reading the Newsarama article, but learned it won't be out till Sept. Could have sworn it was already released, ah well.

Before today though, I had just finished the complete Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

I loved Leaves but it's not for anyone. It's admittedly self-consciously tricky, and he can't really get all the pieces together coherently at the end, but it's still an unsettling read.

glk
07-03-2007, 09:35 AM
Right now I'm reading Michael Chabon's The Yiddish Policeman's Union which is good. I would have finished it by now, but I've been distracted by comics some. I also recently finished Murakami's Kafka On The Shore and Lethem's Fortress Of Solitude. Kafka was good, but one character really ruined it for me. Made me feel like I was watching a really good TV show with a horrible actor for the lead. But Fortress Of Solitude was fantastic and has me anticipating Lethem's Omega that he's doing with Farel Darymple.

I'm also reading/using an instructional art book that Kubert put out. Its good, but not as good as Giordano's in terms of useful information. Sure looks pretty though.

What's everyone else reading and what do you recommend?

I finished Murakami's Hard Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World which was really good. First book of his I've read. Very trippy concept.

Right now I'm almost done with The Road by Cormac McCarthy. I probably can't say anything that hasn't already been said around here except that I'm enjoying it immensely.

glk
07-03-2007, 09:36 AM
Just today bought 'House of Leaves' by Mark Z. Danielewski and 'On the Road' by Jack Kerouac. Debating on which to crack open first, but Leaves is... an odd book, to say the least. Also tried picking up 'The Astonishing Adventures of Fanboy and Goth Girl' after reading the Newsarama article, but learned it won't be out till Sept. Could have sworn it was already released, ah well.

Before today though, I had just finished the complete Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

I absolutely LOVED House of Leaves. I was bummed when it was over. I know some people have complaints but I thought it was perfect front to back.

glk
07-03-2007, 09:37 AM
I'm almost finished with A Long Way Gone the memoirs of a boy soldier. It's good.

Is that about the kid who ultimately went to the UN? Freaky shit man. It's seriously a luck of the draw where you're born and we are SO FUCKING LUCKY to have been born where we were.

Doug
07-03-2007, 09:38 AM
I'm currently reading The Bad Guys Won! A Season of Brawling, Boozing, Bimbo Chasing, and Championship Baseball with Straw, Doc, Mookie, Nails, the Kid, and the rest of the 1986 Mests, the Rowdiest Team Ever to Put on a New York Uniform - and Maybe the Best by Jeff Pearlman. It definately has the longest title of any book I've ever read.

86 was the year I first got into baseball. I'm a Yankee fan not a Mets fan, but the 86 World Series is the first one that I remember watching with my father, so it brings back some memories. Plus I know I'm going to like the ending of the book. Poor Bill Buckner.

TIP
07-03-2007, 09:38 AM
I'm currently in the middle of Chabon's The Yiddish Policemen's Union (awesome thus far).

Also in the midst of Pynchon's Against the Day (:rock: )

Finished two (of the three) John Scalzi books:

Old Man's War
and
The Ghost Brigades

Now on The Last Colony (the third one of this trilogy)

Steve Erikson's Midnight Tides (fifth book of his Malazan series)

T

TIP
07-03-2007, 09:43 AM
Oh...and I just got Soon I Will Be Invincible by Austin Grossman from Amazon
and a replacement copy of THE DRAGON NEVER SLEEPS by Glen Cook (of Black Company fame).

T

Shannon Chenoweth
07-03-2007, 09:46 AM
I'm reading a few books... "Creativity: Unleashing the Forces Within" by Osho, Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott, and I'm about to start the new Chabon book as well as Falling Man by Don Demillo.
Also, I recently finished The Tao of Writing and Wild Mild, both books on writing that I really loved. I've got Goldberg's Down the Bones on my stack to read soon.

spencerdidyrmom
07-03-2007, 09:52 AM
I'm reading a few books... "Creativity: Unleashing the Forces Within" by Osho, Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott, and I'm about to start the new Chabon book as well as Falling Man by Don Demillo.
Also, I recently finished The Tao of Writing and Wild Mild, both books on writing that I really loved. I've got Goldberg's Down the Bones on my stack to read soon.

Have you read Stephen King's On Writing? If you haven't, you definitely should. It's really encouraging and funny.

Shannon Chenoweth
07-03-2007, 09:53 AM
Have you read Stephen King's On Writing? If you haven't, you definitely should. It's really encouraging and funny.

Ha, funny you mention that. I got it as a gift about a year or so ago, and I have yet to read it. But, I will! :)

Jacob Lyon Goddard
07-03-2007, 09:56 AM
I absolutely LOVED House of Leaves. I was bummed when it was over. I know some people have complaints but I thought it was perfect front to back.

Camille Paglia was a professor of mine when the book came out
she wasn't crazy about being in the book, but that might have just been a knee jerk reaction at first

NeverWanderer
07-03-2007, 10:02 AM
i have I am Legend, Earth Abides, and American Gods in the mail from amazon (hopfully here by Thurs).
-RAZ

Both of those books are so, so good.

I'm currently bouncing between K.J. Parker's "Pattern", Tim Lebbon's "Dusk", Christopher Golden's "Hellboy: The Lost Army" and "Of Saints And Shadows", Barb & J.C. Hendee's "Sister of the Dead", Chuck Pahlaniuk's "Lullaby", China Meiville's "Perdido Street Station", and Eric Nylund's "Halo: Ghosts of Onyx"...

...and between all of that, I've read Watchmen, Alan Moore's DC Universe, and Grant Morrison's run on X-Men...

...and the funny part of it all? The first book I'm gonna finish before any of these is the next Harry Potter.

Bryan H
07-03-2007, 10:08 AM
I absolutely LOVED House of Leaves. I was bummed when it was over. I know some people have complaints but I thought it was perfect front to back.

I've yet to hear a bad word about it, now I have to start with that one. High hopes.

Dusto
07-03-2007, 01:35 PM
I finished Murakami's Hard Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World which was really good. First book of his I've read. Very trippy concept.

That's my favorite book by him. You should also read A Wild Sheep Chase. And then The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle. Well, everything by him has its merits, but those three are the best. Oh, except Norwegian Wood is better than Wind-Up Bird. So those four are the best.

kylethoreau
07-03-2007, 01:49 PM
currently working my way through the Harry Potter series before the seventh one hits

after that I have like 3 Hard Case crime books that need my attention

then I want to start on Rant and the upcoming Dexter novel

Dusto
07-03-2007, 01:53 PM
Let's see, I've read a bunch of stuff lately:

The Sinai Tapestry, by Edward Whittemore: Basically like a Pynchon book in plot, with a more straightforward style reminiscent of Vonnegut. It's somewhat similar in subject matter to Against the Day, and I recommend anyone who enjoyed that book to check out this one, which is followed by:

Jerusalem Poker, the second book of The Jerusalem Quartet, and which tells the story of some relatively minor characters from the first book, but which is even better than the first book. I haven't read the final two books in the series, yet, but they look great.

The Chinese Bell Murders, by Robert Van Gulik: Entertaining detective story set in Tang Dynasty China and written in the style of a Ming-era detective story. The third of his books I've read about this detective, Judge Dee.

I Am Legend, by Richard Matheson: A good, compelling book about loneliness (or at least about being alone). A few inconsistencies, but overall very well written.

The Chinese Nail Murders, by RVG: The fourth of the Judge Dee books that I've read, and the last in the series, though I missed a couple. It has a weird middle, but a very satisfying conclusion.

Curtain, by Agatha Christie: The final Hercule Poirot mystery. Really interesting solution, but some odd bits as well. Characters with very odd attitudes, like espousing the killing of weak babies and old people and not really being challenged on this idea by the main characters.

Strange Tales From a Chinese Studio, by Pu Songling: Everyone should read this book. Or maybe not. I really dug it, though. It was just released in a new translation last year through Penguin Classics, but it was written in the late 1600's. It's never been translated in its totality, to my knowledge, but this new translation of about a quarter of it is the only way to go, since the old translations are all pretty bad. Anyway, it's basically what the title describes: a bunch of strange tales. Many are supernatural, about men marrying women who turn out to be foxes, or magic swordsmen who have to fight demons, or Daoist priests with magic powers, but there are alos just stories about weird stuff that happened, like a woman who had sex with a dog that later killed her husband out of jealousy. Uniformly good stuff, though.

Started Quicksilver by Neal Stephenson, which is good except for all of the heavyhanded expository dialogue. Also started Blood Meridian for about the tenth time in five years. I have a really hard time taking Cormac McCarthy seriously, but I'm going to try to make it all the way through this time. Also reading The Collected Letters of Dave Sim, Vol. 2.

Josh!
07-03-2007, 02:09 PM
Londonstani by Guatam Malkani.

Soooo fucking good. There's a twist ending, which I didn't see coming at all. My jaw hit the floor. Seriously, it was awesome.

The book is about a bunch of Asian rudeboys in London. It's a satire- smart, and funny (if you can get over the fact they speak like a text message).

Also, for those who've read/reading the new Chabon, what'd you think?

I loved it, and I'm a bit more suprised there isn't an outrage coming from the Jewish community (I'm Jewish-- thought the ending was awesome, but kind of shocking).

I don't want to spoil anything, but I asked him about that, and he sort of shrugged it off.

Jacob Lyon Goddard
07-03-2007, 02:58 PM
Also tried picking up 'The Astonishing Adventures of Fanboy and Goth Girl' after reading the Newsarama article, but learned it won't be out till Sept. Could have sworn it was already released, ah well.


saw copies at MoCCA
looked good

Buk Was Right
07-03-2007, 03:38 PM
Also tried picking up 'The Astonishing Adventures of Fanboy and Goth Girl' after reading the Newsarama article, but learned it won't be out till Sept. Could have sworn it was already released, ah well.

I'm pretty sure it's already out... Maybe it's only in HC and the paperback is out in Sept...

Doug
07-04-2007, 04:39 AM
Londonstani by Guatam Malkani.

Soooo fucking good. There's a twist ending, which I didn't see coming at all. My jaw hit the floor. Seriously, it was awesome.

The book is about a bunch of Asian rudeboys in London. It's a satire- smart, and funny (if you can get over the fact they speak like a text message).

Also, for those who've read/reading the new Chabon, what'd you think?

I loved it, and I'm a bit more suprised there isn't an outrage coming from the Jewish community (I'm Jewish-- thought the ending was awesome, but kind of shocking).

I don't want to spoil anything, but I asked him about that, and he sort of shrugged it off.

I just finished the book last Sunday. I'm not Jewish and I don't really know much about Jewish culture, but I really enjoyed the book as a straight forward detective story. I'm sure that I'm missing a lot of the deeper meaning by not studying the Jewish culture, but I really enjoyed the book.

The outrage your talking about, are you reffering to:
The Verbovers and the US Govt. starting a war so the Jews can have Isreal back?

If that's the case I don't expect there to be too much back lash.
It's not like Chabon made it look like all Jews were evil. Plus the US has some real life experience with the country going to war for less then honest reasons. Granted in the book the Verbovers and the US Govt. aren't actually fighting the war, but manipulating others to fight it for them.

That's just how I saw the ending.

Like I said I may have missed a lot of the subtle deeper meaning of the book, but it didn't make me feel stupid like reading Cormac McCarthy can sometimes do.

Blandy vs Terrorism
07-04-2007, 04:42 AM
I'm finally getting around to finishing the third Harry Potter book.

Bryan H
07-04-2007, 05:40 AM
saw copies at MoCCA
looked good


I'm pretty sure it's already out... Maybe it's only in HC and the paperback is out in Sept...

I hate stupid book store people.

Thanks, I'll take another look around tomorrow!

Andrew j
07-04-2007, 06:21 AM
Finishing up the Flashman series. Best books I've ever read in my entire life.

Mark Twain's Innocents Abroad.

Language in thought and Action by S.I Hayakawa

When I'm done I'm going to read The Man Who Would Be King: the first American in Afghanistan which is about the guy Kiplings book is based on.

Also The Hollywood history of the world about how the accuracy of period pieces.

Josh!
07-04-2007, 06:29 AM
I just finished the book last Sunday. I'm not Jewish and I don't really know much about Jewish culture, but I really enjoyed the book as a straight forward detective story. I'm sure that I'm missing a lot of the deeper meaning by not studying the Jewish culture, but I really enjoyed the book.

The outrage your talking about, are you reffering to:
The Verbovers and the US Govt. starting a war so the Jews can have Isreal back?

If that's the case I don't expect there to be too much back lash.
It's not like Chabon made it look like all Jews were evil. Plus the US has some real life experience with the country going to war for less then honest reasons. Granted in the book the Verbovers and the US Govt. aren't actually fighting the war, but manipulating others to fight it for them.

That's just how I saw the ending.

Like I said I may have missed a lot of the subtle deeper meaning of the book, but it didn't make me feel stupid like reading Cormac McCarthy can sometimes do.


Yes, but specifically I'm referring to the partying in the streets after the dome of the rock got blown up.

I was pretty shocked he did that-- almost like a reverse 9-11 (where some Palestinians were partying in the streets).

I really loved the book, don't get me wrong, but I'm a little surprised some of the (hyper-sensitive) Jewish groups haven't come out against this book.

(although, I guess in the decades since "Portnoy's Complaint," this might be fairly tame).

Josh!
07-04-2007, 06:31 AM
Oh, and another thing, it really seemed to me like a big indictment of the Bush administration's policies (and messianic tendencies).

(Which, given the fact that he's publically supporting his wife's law school buddy, Barack Obama, doesn't surprise me).
I guess I just wish this book was sparking more discussion, rather than everybody just praising it (which, admittedly, I'm doing too).

jason hissong
07-04-2007, 06:36 AM
Ha, funny you mention that. I got it as a gift about a year or so ago, and I have yet to read it. But, I will! :)

I think that book is the most interesting thing King has ever written.

/(. . )/
07-04-2007, 06:39 AM
I'm reading Kafka on the Shore.

But I'm reading it in it's original language, so I'm on page 130 of 800 after 3 months.

Dusto
07-04-2007, 06:42 AM
I'm reading Kafka on the Shore.

But I'm reading it in it's original language, so I'm on page 130 of 800 after 3 months.

You really ARE persevering.

/(. . )/
07-04-2007, 06:46 AM
I also recently finished Murakami's Kafka On The Shore and Lethem's Fortress Of Solitude. Kafka was good, but one character really ruined it for me. Made me feel like I was watching a really good TV show with a horrible actor for the lead.

Are you talking about Nakata?

In the Japanese version, he speaks in a very formal language style called keigo. It cannot be translated to English. I looked at the English version to see how the translator did it and it just doesn't feel the same. The translator even said in an interview that it was a challenge for him to write the character. Don't fault the translator, it's nearly impossible to translate keigo into English.

Also, Nakata, if pronounced, nakatta, is the past tense form of nothing. Just realized that.

Please don't spoil me, I'm on chapter 10.

/(. . )/
07-04-2007, 06:49 AM
You really ARE persevering.

I'm reading it with an electronic dictionary. But still, there are a number of words per page that I haven't yet learned, so it takes me about 20 minutes to read a page.

There are about 2000 kanji in use and I can only read and write about 1300, so everytime I see a new kanji, I have to look it up as well. Luckily, the way to read the rare kanji are given next to the words. It's complicated to explain.

Dusto
07-04-2007, 06:52 AM
That's better than me. I tried to read a Jin Yong novel in Chinese, and it took me about an hour a page. An electronic dictionary would probably help, though. Looking up characters by their radicals and stroke counts is time consuming.

/(. . )/
07-04-2007, 06:57 AM
That's better than me. I tried to read a Jin Yong novel in Chinese, and it took me about an hour a page. An electronic dictionary would probably help, though. Looking up characters by their radicals and stroke counts is time consuming.

I didn't know you know Chinese.

Yes, it's time consuming and electronic dictionaries are the shit.

Chinese overwhelms me..

What's your novel about? Is it available in bookstores? I'm visiting the States, soon..

Mylazycat
07-04-2007, 06:58 AM
I just finished reading JPod by Douglas Coupland, too. I'm starting The Friends Of Meager Fortune by David Adams Richards.

I loved Kafka On The Shore when I read it last year.

I'm thinking of picking up the newest Chuck Palahniuk novel soon.

Mr. E!
07-04-2007, 07:02 AM
I've just finished Christopher Moore's A Dirty Job, which was as much fun as the rest of his books. I can always pick up one of his books and know I'm going to enjoy it.

I'm currently in the middle of English's The Westies, which is a story about the Irish Mob in Hell's Kitchen in the 70s.
I'm also reading Greg Palast's Armed Madhouse. Damn, it is depressing. It pisses me off every few pages. I'm at his hurricane Katrina section right now.
I'm about to try to get back into Oswald's Ghost by Mailer.

Doug
07-04-2007, 07:02 AM
Oh, and another thing, it really seemed to me like a big indictment of the Bush administration's policies (and messianic tendencies).

(Which, given the fact that he's publically supporting his wife's law school buddy, Barack Obama, doesn't surprise me).
I guess I just wish this book was sparking more discussion, rather than everybody just praising it (which, admittedly, I'm doing too).

Yeah, I'm surprised more people aren't talking about it.

The partying in the street did take me by surprise, but it is a strange time to be a Jew.

What I really liked about the ending of the book was:
The solution to Shpilman's murder was a simple revenge plot, and not nearly as complicated as Landsman was making it out to be. I also liked that the father figure he looked up to, Uncle Hertz, was the main villian of the piece. And even though the man he thought he could respect turned into a true villian, he found the strength within himself to do the right thing at the end.

It also seemed like he started to rely on his own judgement more once he stopped drinking. Like he found his old hero cop persona once he no longer relyed on the booze to cloud his thinking.

Mr. E!
07-04-2007, 07:03 AM
I just finished reading JPod by Douglas Coupland, too. I'm starting The Friends Of Meager Fortune by David Adams Richards.

I loved Kafka On The Shore when I read it last year.

I'm thinking of picking up the newest Chuck Palahniuk novel soon.

How was Jpod? I love Coupland.

Dusto
07-04-2007, 07:11 AM
I didn't know you know Chinese.

Yes, it's time consuming and electronic dictionaries are the shit.

Chinese overwhelms me..

What's your novel about? Is it available in bookstores? I'm visiting the States, soon..

Well, I've taken a couple years of Chinese, but my vocab is still pretty small. I know maybe 2000 characters. And by "know" I mean I can read them, but I'd be hard pressed to write most of them from memory.

Icelander is in bookstores in paperback. It's slightly Murakami-esque, in that it has a sort of detective form, but it's not really a straight detective novel. I actually sent him a copy hoping to get a cover blurb, but he sent me back a note thanking me for the book but saying he doesn't do blurbs for anyone. Anyway, the back of the book:


A Nabokovian goof on Agatha Christie; a madcap mystery in the deceptive tradition of The Crying of Lot 49; The Third Policeman meets The Da Vinci Code. Icelander is the wildly imaginative and marvelously plotted debut novel from Dustin Long--an intricate, giddy romp steeped equally in Nordic lore and pulpy intrigue.

When Shirley MacGuffin is found murdered one day prior to the annual town celebration in remembrance of Our Heroine's mother--the legendary crime-stopper and evil-thwarter Emily ean--everyone expects Our Heroine to follow in her mother's footsteps and solve the case. She, however, has no interest in inheriting the family business, or bbeing chased through steam tunnels, or listening to skaldic karaoke, or fleeing the inhuman Refurserkir. But evil has no interest in her lack of interest--and thus, adventure ensues.

The new novel I'm working on, though, is set in late 17th Century China, which is why I decided to learn Chinese. It's actually a pretty simple language grammatically. I just wish it had a phonetic writing system.

jamestolliver
07-04-2007, 07:31 AM
I'm about to finishWhat's Your Most Dangerous Idea?

Here's the amazon blurb:


From Copernicus to Darwin, to current-day thinkers, scientists have always promoted theories and unveiled discoveries that challenge everything society holds dear; ideas with both positive and dire consequences. Many thoughts that resonate today are dangerous not because they are assumed to be false, but because they might turn out to be true.

What do the world's leading scientists and thinkers consider to be their most dangerous idea? Through the leading online forum Edge (www.edge.org), the call went out, and this compelling and easily digestible volume collects the answers. From using medication to permanently alter our personalities to contemplating a universe in which we are utterly alone, to the idea that the universe might be fundamentally inexplicable, What Is Your Dangerous Idea? takes an unflinching look at the daring, breathtaking, sometimes terrifying thoughts that could forever alter our world and the way we live in it.


So far I'm really enjoying it. It gives a bunch of different perspectives on a huge range of topics and is very accessible to the average joe. A couple times it seems repetitive but it is edited nicely and will give you a some great "huh" moments. Occasionally I needed to just step back and reflect. I would recommend it for people interested in modern day science and/or philosophy.

Tom G.
07-04-2007, 07:48 AM
I'm currently reading Miranda July's short story collection No one belongs here more than you. and enjoying it. It's warped and creepy yet oddly heartfelt and emotionally believable at the same time. If you liked her film Me You and Everyone We Know then I think you would enjoy this book.

TacoKid
07-04-2007, 07:48 AM
No one belongs here more than you. Stories by Miranda July.

I'm a huge fan of her movie, "Me and you and everyone we know". A book of short stories that is hard to put down. Love it.

TacoKid
07-04-2007, 07:49 AM
WOW.

Both posted in the exact same minute.

Tom G.
07-04-2007, 07:52 AM
No one belongs here more than you. Stories by Miranda July.

I'm a huge fan of her movie, "Me and you and everyone we know". A book of short stories that is hard to put down. Love it.

Ha! We both posted about this at the same time. What was your favorite story of the collection? I loved Something That Needs Nothing about the girl who work in the peep show

TacoKid
07-04-2007, 07:55 AM
The Man on the Stairs

I'm not sure why, but I've read it like 5 times and it just kicks me every time.

Tom G.
07-04-2007, 08:03 AM
The Man on the Stairs

I'm not sure why, but I've read it like 5 times and it just kicks me every time.

Yes, she builds an amazing amount of tension while encapsulating an entire relationship in a couple pages and I love the ending.

/(. . )/
07-04-2007, 08:07 AM
Well, I've taken a couple years of Chinese, but my vocab is still pretty small. I know maybe 2000 characters. And by "know" I mean I can read them, but I'd be hard pressed to write most of them from memory.

Icelander is in bookstores in paperback. It's slightly Murakami-esque, in that it has a sort of detective form, but it's not really a straight detective novel. I actually sent him a copy hoping to get a cover blurb, but he sent me back a note thanking me for the book but saying he doesn't do blurbs for anyone. Anyway, the back of the book:



The new novel I'm working on, though, is set in late 17th Century China, which is why I decided to learn Chinese. It's actually a pretty simple language grammatically. I just wish it had a phonetic writing system.
Sounds interesting. Good luck with the Chinese. 2000 characters is great!

Mylazycat
07-04-2007, 11:48 AM
How was Jpod? I love Coupland.

Funny and weird. Not as emotionally far reaching as some of his other books, but a light read. I think it helped that I never got around to reading Microsurfs, the one book I hear JPod most compared to being a lesser version of. I should probably put that one on my to get list, actually.

Jpod is actually the first book that made me want to see what Coupland would come up with if he wrote comics.

V-Man
07-04-2007, 12:08 PM
I just finished The Playboy Interviews: The Directors...one of the best books I've ever read check it out! I'm just about to start David Mamet's Bambi vs. Godzilla and can't wait!

D. George
07-04-2007, 12:32 PM
Just finished Greg Rucka's A Fistful Of Rain, and just started Malcom Gladwell's Blink. In the waiting line is Michael Chabon's Yiddish Policemen's Union and Max Brooks' World War Z.

haloJONES
07-04-2007, 09:36 PM
wait a second, you mean you read books without pictures???
is this some kind of joke?? are you serious??
thats not funny.

haloJONES
07-04-2007, 09:38 PM
black hawn down was an excellant read and i'm not starting to read
stephan king's everything excellant: 1408

iGotKittyPryde
07-05-2007, 10:04 AM
How was Jpod? I love Coupland.

It was... interesting. For the first half it was just quality Coupland, in the vein of Microserfs, but updated for the current technology. Then it takes a turn to the weird, with some meta elements, but they're well done and I still rather liked it.

Overall, it's one of his better books, I think.

spencerdidyrmom
07-05-2007, 10:11 AM
Are you talking about Nakata?

In the Japanese version, he speaks in a very formal language style called keigo. It cannot be translated to English. I looked at the English version to see how the translator did it and it just doesn't feel the same. The translator even said in an interview that it was a challenge for him to write the character. Don't fault the translator, it's nearly impossible to translate keigo into English.

Also, Nakata, if pronounced, nakatta, is the past tense form of nothing. Just realized that.

Please don't spoil me, I'm on chapter 10.

I'm drawing a blank. Is Nakatathe old man? If so, no, he's cool. I actually like him alot. Its the character that gets introduced later on who ends up becoming a somewhat major character in the cast. It was like watching a really, really bad actor. Then again, maybe it was how I read it, which would be a little weird.

Mylazycat
07-05-2007, 10:20 AM
It was... interesting. For the first half it was just quality Coupland, in the vein of Microserfs, but updated for the current technology. Then it takes a turn to the weird, with some meta elements, but they're well done and I still rather liked it.

Overall, it's one of his better books, I think.

One of his more entertaining, but, for me, Hey! Nostradamus! and Girlfriend In A Coma touched me deeper. I loaned Hey! Nostradamus! to a girl at work and she said it made her cry. :(

Mylazycat
07-05-2007, 10:23 AM
I'm drawing a blank. Is Nakatathe old man? If so, no, he's cool. I actually like him alot. Its the character that gets introduced later on who ends up becoming a somewhat major character in the cast. It was like watching a really, really bad actor. Then again, maybe it was how I read it, which would be a little weird.

Yes,

Nakata is the old man

So, you must mean

the guy who befriends Nakata?

iGotKittyPryde
07-05-2007, 10:33 AM
One of his more entertaining, but, for me, Hey! Nostradamus! and Girlfriend In A Coma touched me deeper. I loaned Hey! Nostradamus! to a girl at work and she said it made her cry. :(

I didn't mean to say it was his BEST or anything. But it was constitently entertaining and I kind of enjoyed the meta aspect once it was more obvious that that's what it was. And I think the humor shined through better than in the other books, which is one of the things I like the best about Coupland.

I haven't read Girlfriend in years, so I can't say about that one but I DID rather enjoy H!N!. Actually I read all the DC books quite a while ago, when they were released. Perhaps at some point in the future I'll read through them again and see if JPod ranks a little lower. It might, but it's still good.

Better, for example, than Rant was. Actually I thought "All Families are Psychotic" seemed a bit like an attempt at a Palahniuk-esque book, back when I read it. And I will say that I'm pretty sure Coupland, who is one of my top half dozen favorite writers hasn't ever written anything as good as Survivor or Choke. But Rant just barely didn't work for me. It was all right, but not spectacular and certainly not on the level of the first few Palahniuk novels (not counting Invisible Monsters, which I thought was kind of a mess)

Mylazycat
07-05-2007, 10:51 AM
I didn't mean to say it was his BEST or anything. But it was constitently entertaining and I kind of enjoyed the meta aspect once it was more obvious that that's what it was. And I think the humor shined through better than in the other books, which is one of the things I like the best about Coupland.

Ia agree, it was his most humorous book, filled with crazy situations and lines.

I just saw on amazon coming fall 2007: "The Gum Thief (Hardcover)" by Douglas Coupland.

Wow, that was fast. I can't wait.

I was thinking of picking up Rant but if it doesn't hold up to Choke, which I thought was pure genius, then now I'm not so sure.

spencerdidyrmom
07-05-2007, 03:40 PM
Yes,

Nakata is the old man

So, you must mean

the guy who befriends Nakata?

Exactly. Hated his character the whole time which made the last half a chore to read. I'm looking forward to Wind Up Bird though.

iGotKittyPryde
07-06-2007, 09:14 AM
Ia agree, it was his most humorous book, filled with crazy situations and lines.

I just saw on amazon coming fall 2007: "The Gum Thief (Hardcover)" by Douglas Coupland.

Wow, that was fast. I can't wait.

I was thinking of picking up Rant but if it doesn't hold up to Choke, which I thought was pure genius, then now I'm not so sure.

Well... I'm not sure I'd BUY Rant but it was worth taking it out of the library. It just wasn't *amazing*, which is what I keep hoping for from Palahniuk. It keeps not happening ever since Choke, but I keep hoping.

It was worth reading though. Don't let me discourage you too much.

Doug
07-10-2007, 05:38 AM
Has anyone read Sharp Objects: A Novel by Gillian Flynn?

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0307341550/ref=wl_it_dp/103-7664364-8275031?ie=UTF8&coliid=IS5YNS3BFFQEK&colid=26UP71HF3XMN8

Amazon has some good things to say about it, and I was thinking of picking it up, but I'm curious to see what others say about it. And no, I don't trust Amazon reviews. The people who review on Amazon do so because they either love the book or hate the book, so most reviews are either 1 star or 5 stars with very little in between. (Yes, I'm a hypocrite because I have my fair share of reviews on Amazon, but I haven't written one in a while.)

DAVE
07-10-2007, 06:12 AM
So I just finished the book I was reading, "The Tender Bar". That was the best book I've read in a long long time.
Great summer read, I highly recommend it.

Martin J
07-10-2007, 12:57 PM
Currently reading Fierce Invalods Home from Hot Climates bt Tom Robbins and about to start either Still Life with Woodpeckers also by Tom Robbins, Harry Potter 7 or Crooked little Vein if i can be arsed to order it from Amazon.com either that or i'll wait till its out in the UK.

MJ

ultimate samwise gamgee
07-10-2007, 01:03 PM
Just finished Mike Carey's "The Devil You Know" which was really good.

Also, I highly recommend Peter David's "The Darkness of the Light." (I think that's the title.)

glk
07-10-2007, 01:24 PM
Just finished The Road by Cormac McCarthy. Awesome. Reading Warped Passages by Lisa Randall now.

Colby
07-10-2007, 01:39 PM
Just finished "Carter Beats the Devil" by Glen David Gold. Kinda hard to get into, but very, VERY worth it.

I've now started "Summer of '49" by David Halberstam. If it keeps up like this, I'm going to have to track down the rest of Dave's work.

THWIP!
07-10-2007, 02:02 PM
Finished Dirty Martini and The Perks of Being a Wallflower. I'm re-reading Sideways right now.

TonyFleecs
07-10-2007, 02:03 PM
I'm reading A Ticket to the Boneyard by Lawrence Block.

It is pretty fucking great.

Buk Was Right
07-10-2007, 02:05 PM
So I just finished the book I was reading, "The Tender Bar". That was the best book I've read in a long long time.
Great summer read, I highly recommend it.

My dad gave me that book a few months ago and I haven't even looked at it yet. Maybe it'll be next after I finish The Road and Rant.

DAVE
07-10-2007, 03:38 PM
My dad gave me that book a few months ago and I haven't even looked at it yet. Maybe it'll be next after I finish The Road and Rant.

From talking to you here, I think you'd really like the book.

You like baseball, drinking and men talking shit, right?

Buk Was Right
07-10-2007, 03:41 PM
From talking to you here, I think you'd really like the book.

You like baseball, drinking and men talking shit, right?

I both like and live those things daily...

chad2271
07-10-2007, 06:01 PM
I'm reading A Ticket to the Boneyard by Lawrence Block.

It is pretty fucking great.

is this new or old?

i recently finished his hard case crime girl with long green heart and loved it.

TonyFleecs
07-10-2007, 06:27 PM
is this new or old?

i recently finished his hard case crime girl with long green heart and loved it.
It's old. It's the 5th or 6th Matthew Scudder book. I need to grab 'long green heart, Fialkov also said it was great.

edit: it's the 8th Scudder novel.
http://www.lawrenceblock.com/index_framesetfl.htm

Justin.Strange
07-10-2007, 07:54 PM
Currently reading.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/a/a4/Company%28novel%29.jpg/406px-Company%28novel%29.jpg

It's like an updated version of Office Space set in a post-9/11 world with elements of Lost tossed in. Fun and interesting read so far.

jamestolliver
07-10-2007, 07:57 PM
Finished Dirty Martini and The Perks of Being a Wallflower. I'm re-reading Sideways right now.

Loved the book but kind of hated the ending.

PeteL
07-11-2007, 04:53 AM
I started reading Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian last night.

spencerdidyrmom
07-11-2007, 08:23 AM
Currently reading.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/a/a4/Company%28novel%29.jpg/406px-Company%28novel%29.jpg

It's like an updated version of Office Space set in a post-9/11 world with elements of Lost tossed in. Fun and interesting read so far.

I think I'll have to check this out.

Justin.Strange
07-12-2007, 08:31 AM
I think I'll have to check this out.

You should. You'd probably dig it. Word is, it just got optioned. So if you read it now, you'll be one of the cool kids that read it way back before it was a movie...

yeamon
07-12-2007, 08:37 AM
The Man Who Would Be King: The First American in Afghanistan by Ben Macintyre.

Biography of Josiah Harlan, a Pennsylvania Quaker who in the 1830's followed the trail of Alexander the Great, to eventually set up his own kingdom and command his own army... for a few months, before the British came in and gave him the boot.

I'm yet to read any fiction that is as fascinating and exciting as this guy's life story.

Yorick Brown
07-12-2007, 09:15 AM
I started reading Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian last night.

So good.

Dusto
07-12-2007, 09:29 AM
The Man Who Would Be King: The First American in Afghanistan by Ben Macintyre.

Biography of Josiah Harlan, a Pennsylvania Quaker who in the 1830's followed the trail of Alexander the Great, to eventually set up his own kingdom and command his own army... for a few months, before the British came in and gave him the boot.

I'm yet to read any fiction that is as fascinating and exciting as this guy's life story.

It was a good movie. And Harlan's descendant starred in the original Dawn of the Dead, though he didn't know he was descended from royalty until we attacked Afghanistan in 2002.

yeamon
07-12-2007, 12:51 PM
It was a good movie. And Harlan's descendant starred in the original Dawn of the Dead, though he didn't know he was descended from royalty until we attacked Afghanistan in 2002.


Are you talking about the Sean Connery film based on the Kipling story? I love that movie. But I never knew that Kipling actually based his story from bits and pieces he had picked up about Harlan when Kipling was in the service. Of course, I also never knew that the real Man Who Would Be King was American.

If half the stuff in this bio is true, it's just amazing. The guy came to India serving with the British army as a surgeon. Having never attended medical school and no formal training. His brother was a surgeon, and Harlan just read all his textbooks.

Can't believe I'd never heard of this guy until recently.

chad2271
07-12-2007, 02:02 PM
It's old. It's the 5th or 6th Matthew Scudder book. I need to grab 'long green heart, Fialkov also said it was great.

edit: it's the 8th Scudder novel.
http://www.lawrenceblock.com/index_framesetfl.htm

thanks,

need to jump into the scudder series soon

block is quickly becoming one of my fav writers

Justin.Strange
07-25-2007, 10:14 PM
Currently reading.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/b3/Reluctant_Fundamentalist.JPG

Clayton James
07-25-2007, 10:16 PM
Right now I'm reading Wonder Boys by Michael Chabon.

I'll probably finish it tomorrow and then read some Phillip K Dick. Or maybe Borders will call and say Crooked Little Vein is in.

chazbot
07-25-2007, 10:25 PM
I'm reading the fantabulous Party Monster by James St. James

Hennessy
07-25-2007, 10:36 PM
I think I'll have to check this out.

Maxx Barry and Company truly underwhelmed me. He took some archetypes and re-harvest the same situations within many office work environments stories.
I almost think their should be a moratorium for Cubicle satires. Yes, we get it already, your lives are soooo hard because you work indoors in an office doing monkey work shuffling papers. Please, let us not think that there could be worse jobs out there that people also do and hate.

Hennessy
07-25-2007, 10:37 PM
I started reading Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian last night.

I've learned this summer that you can't read enough McCarthy.

Joe Kalicki
07-25-2007, 10:44 PM
Please, let us not think that there could be worse jobs out there that people also do and hate.

I agree. . . but I still love Dilbert and Office Space.

I would love to work in a cubicle.

iGotKittyPryde
07-26-2007, 08:46 AM
Currently reading.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/b3/Reluctant_Fundamentalist.JPG

I read that. It's pretty good, if a bit of a quick read.

Definitely recomended though...

Buk Was Right
07-26-2007, 08:51 AM
Finished Caught Stealing on the way to work today (which makes it the third book in three weeks that I've finished on the way to work... which leaves me at a loss for what to read on the way home).

I was going to read something by a different author next, but there was a preview of the sequel Six Bad Things and it hooked me HARD... So I'll probably check that one out next.

RegularJoe
07-26-2007, 08:54 AM
reading: private wars - greg rucka

in the last few weeks, i've read "spare change" and "blue screen" by robert b. parker, "micah" by laurell k. hamilton & harry potter books 5, 6 & 7.

Buk Was Right
07-26-2007, 08:59 AM
reading: private wars - greg rucka.

Is that the new Aticus Kodiak book? Or something else?

RegularJoe
07-26-2007, 09:00 AM
Is that the new Aticus Kodiak book? Or something else?

the 2nd Q&C novel

Buk Was Right
07-26-2007, 09:02 AM
the 2nd Q&C novel

Ah, thanks.

Haven't read any of the Q&C novels (or very many of the comics for that matter), but devoured the Kodiak books... I think there's a new one on the horizon, but maybe I'm wish-dreaming again.

Masculine Todd
07-26-2007, 09:03 AM
Okay. You guys are so going to blast me for this, and I know it fits me cliche-style like a velure jogging suit on a fat man, but I'm reading Everyone Hurts: An Essential Guide to Emo Culture. It's a highly satirical look at the scene and is unrelentless in it's scathing absurdity. I love how self-deprecating it is (considering it's written by two Alt Press contributors and self-professed scenesters).

http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/51dul4uX5JL._SS500_.jpg

I'd recommend it to fans of/or detracters of the scene who love it or think it's inane. Both will get a kick out of it.

PeteL
07-26-2007, 09:05 AM
Both Queen & Country novels (as well as the comic series) are excellent reads.

Just as exciting as the Kodiak books.

Buk, you're not wish-dreaming.

Patriot Acts (http://www.amazon.com/Patriot-Acts-Greg-Rucka/dp/0553804731/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/103-9748467-3483849?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1185469461&sr=8-1) out on August 28th.

PeteL
07-26-2007, 09:05 AM
Okay. You guys are so going to blast me for this, and I know it fits me cliche-style like a velure jogging suit on a fat man, but I'm reading Everyone Hurts: An Essential Guide to Emo Culture. It's a highly satirical look at the scene and is unrelentless in it's scathing absurdity. I love how self-deprecating it is (considering it's written by two Alt Press contributors and self-professed scenesters).

http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/51dul4uX5JL._SS500_.jpg

I'd recommend it to fans of/or detracters of the scene who love it or think it's inane. Both will get a kick out of it.

Is this like the hipster handbook from a few years back?

Masculine Todd
07-26-2007, 09:06 AM
Is this like the hipster handbook from a few years back?

Yes, with the same tongue-in-cheek ambiance to it.

PeteL
07-26-2007, 09:07 AM
Yes, with the same tongue-in-cheek ambiance to it.

Yeah, I remember that book being pretty funny.

Buk Was Right
07-26-2007, 09:11 AM
Both Queen & Country novels (as well as the comic series) are excellent reads.

Just as exciting as the Kodiak books.

Buk, you're not wish-dreaming.

Patriot Acts (http://www.amazon.com/Patriot-Acts-Greg-Rucka/dp/0553804731/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/103-9748467-3483849?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1185469461&sr=8-1) out on August 28th.

Rad. Thanks.

I'll probably wait for the paperback on that one (because I am both a cheap and space conscious person). But I'll probably re-read Critical Space in the meantime.

DAVE
07-26-2007, 09:30 AM
Rad. Thanks.

I'll probably wait for the paperback on that one (because I am both a cheap and space conscious person). But I'll probably re-read Critical Space in the meantime.

Read The Tender Bar you bastich!

Buk Was Right
07-26-2007, 09:34 AM
Read The Tender Bar you bastich!

Oh shit I forgot about that one...

Ok, ok... I'll find it as soon as I get home today...

But it better be goooooood... *shaking fist*

GelfXIII
07-26-2007, 09:46 AM
Read The Tender Bar you bastich!

Read the Yiddish Policemen's Union, you chamoole, you!

DAVE
07-26-2007, 09:48 AM
Read the Yiddish Policemen's Union, you chamoole, you!

I will, but I got some other stuff I wanna read first though.

Justin.Strange
07-26-2007, 06:24 PM
Maxx Barry and Company truly underwhelmed me. He took some archetypes and re-harvest the same situations within many office work environments stories.

I wont argue the fact that it was sorta cliche at times. But I still found it to be enjoyable and worthy of a library check-out.

Tell me. Have you read Jennifer Government yet? I haven't but plan to eventually.


I read that. It's pretty good, if a bit of a quick read.

Definitely recomended though...

I really dig it. I'm so happy I ran across it.

I just finished the chapter where he starts working for the New York firm and meets Erica's parents. I have a feeling this will end so badly, which is sad because he seems like such a nice guy.


Is this like the hipster handbook from a few years back?

Dude! I was at the thrift shop earlier today and I snatched a copy of it for like 75 cents along with a CMJ festival bandtee. We are talking about The Metrosexual Guide to Style: A Handbook for the Modern Man right?

costello
07-26-2007, 06:34 PM
I just finished The Collected Works of Billy the Kid by Michael Ondaatje. It was amazing.

Donal DeLay
07-26-2007, 08:57 PM
I can't recommend Irene Nemirovsky's "Suite Francaise" enough, if you are looking for something serious to read. Really beautiful book about World War Two.

Evanovich for the chics, Dorsey for the guys. Both hilarious mysteries.

Right now I'm reading "The Historian" by Kostova, and "A Crack in the Edge of the World" by Winchester. "Historian" is good so far, a bit slow, but the way she is describing Europe is just beautiful. "Crack in the Edge of the World" is about the 1906 Earthquake told from the point of view of a geologist. Lot's of interesting things about geology, not so much about the human elements of the earthquake.

Bill Bryson's "Mother Tongue" was funny, so I'm picking up "A Walk in the Woods" for the Kentucky trip.



Um, lemme see, on my "I need to finish/pick up" list:

Terror by Simmons
The Descent by Long (much better than the movie so I've heard)
Twilight by Meyer
Lolita by Nabokov
Earthsea by Le Guin (apparently Harry Potter before there was Harry Potter, dunno yet)
The three volumes of 1001 Arabian Nights


And others. ;-)

-Kimberly

(Hey, how was Falling Man? I've heard good things, but haven't picked it up yet.)

spencerdidyrmom
07-27-2007, 07:52 AM
Read the Yiddish Policemen's Union, you chamoole, you!

I just finished this two days ago and it was gooooood. Now I need a new book. Weeeeeaaaaak.

Dusto
07-29-2007, 10:27 AM
I just finished The Collected Works of Billy the Kid by Michael Ondaatje. It was amazing.

I read that. I liked it.

Dusto
07-29-2007, 10:28 AM
I just finished this two days ago and it was gooooood. Now I need a new book. Weeeeeaaaaak.

Want another snowy detective story? Try Icelander, by Dustin Long.

Tuco
08-09-2007, 09:36 AM
well i just finished Earth Abides and this is definetly one of the best books i've ever read. i highly recommend it.
-RAZ

Shane W
08-09-2007, 09:41 AM
I'm reading The Best American Short Stories collection from 2004 right now. Some decent stuff in it. I'm also reading Crooked Little Vein, but it's not that great to me.

Jef UK
08-09-2007, 09:42 AM
100 pages in to Dostoevsky's Demons.

MIKE D
08-09-2007, 09:44 AM
I'm kind of ashamed to admit it, but I just started GONE WITH THE WIND.

spencerdidyrmom
08-09-2007, 09:59 AM
I'm working my way through Men & Cartoons by Jonathan Lethem. Its not going so well which is a bummer because I really liked Fortress Of Solitude. And Dustin, I'll be picking up that Icelander soon. Maybe this weekend. I saw it at the store, but I was running out of money and had other things that I needed to pick up first. But I will check it out!

Jef UK
08-09-2007, 10:13 AM
I'm working my way through Men & Cartoons by Jonathan Lethem.

Is that one of his short story collections? I love Lethem, but I'm not a fan of his short stories. They are certainly not his strong suit.

niceguyeddie
08-09-2007, 10:38 AM
i finished the charlie huston novels. the trilogy and the two joe pitt books.
i'm rereading watchmen and working on Killing Pablo by Mark Bowden.

dEnny!
08-09-2007, 10:42 AM
I've been meaning to pick up the Chabon book. I'm hoping to see the HC super-discounted in the future so I may wait. It's how I got The Perfect Solution novella.

Buk Was Right
08-09-2007, 10:44 AM
Finished Book of Joe this morning and then started Company by Max Barry.

Book of Joe was ok... but not great. I felt like the writer was trying a little too hard to make his main character witty and quick. It just seemed forced sometimes. Also there are a couple of sex scenes that seem to be there for the sake of having a sex scene.

They made a TV show based on the book... I watched about half an episode. It wasn't that great.

I got about 7 pages into Company and fell asleep on the train this morning... I don't attribute that to the book, I blame it more on getting about 4 hours of fitful sleep on the couch last night.

Jef UK
08-09-2007, 10:46 AM
I got the new Chabon for my b-day, and will be reading it after Demons.

jason hissong
08-09-2007, 10:54 AM
I'm currently reading A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by David Eggers. Fifty pages in and it's pretty decent so far.

I just finished Clyde Eddgerton's Where Trouble Sleeps. It was unmemorable on every front. A quick read but nothing worthwhile.

Just before that I read Jonathan Lethem's Gun, With Occasional Music. While decent, I think I was expecting more. I had never read Lethem before, and it's a case of the hype being too much. It was very good, though. I liked his near future sci fi ideas.

McAfee
08-09-2007, 10:59 AM
Currently reading: The Grays by Whitley Strieber and A Painted House by John Grisham

Recently read: Harry Potter #7, The Road by Cormac Macarthy, The Twelfth Card by Jeffrey Deaver and The Summons by Grisham.

Next up: Sons of Fortune by Jeffrey Archer

Dusto
08-09-2007, 11:52 AM
I'm working my way through Men & Cartoons by Jonathan Lethem. Its not going so well which is a bummer because I really liked Fortress Of Solitude. And Dustin, I'll be picking up that Icelander soon. Maybe this weekend. I saw it at the store, but I was running out of money and had other things that I needed to pick up first. But I will check it out!

Cool, I hope you like it when you get around to it.

And with regard to Lethem, my favorites of his are As She Climbed Across the Table which is sort of a love story with some sci-fi twists, and Motherless Brooklyn which is sort of a hardboiled detective story narrated by a guy with Tourette's Syndrome. It's almost more interesting for the insight into Tourette's than it is for the mystery (which is good, too). Gun, With Occasional Music is fun, but it was his first novel and he got better.

Joe Kalicki
08-09-2007, 11:54 AM
I decided I haven't read any Important books yet this year, so I started Sense and Sensibility. It's surprisingly readable.

Jef UK
08-09-2007, 12:41 PM
Cool, I hope you like it when you get around to it.

And with regard to Lethem, my favorites of his are As She Climbed Across the Table which is sort of a love story with some sci-fi twists, and Motherless Brooklyn which is sort of a hardboiled detective story narrated by a guy with Tourette's Syndrome. It's almost more interesting for the insight into Tourette's than it is for the mystery (which is good, too). Gun, With Occasional Music is fun, but it was his first novel and he got better.

For some reason, I found As She Climbed Across the Table sort of annoying. But then I loved Girl In Lanscape, which is a girl's coming of age story--on Mars. Motherless Brooklyn is wonderful.

Dusto
08-09-2007, 01:06 PM
For some reason, I found As She Climbed Across the Table sort of annoying. But then I loved Girl In Lanscape, which is a girl's coming of age story--on Mars. Motherless Brooklyn is wonderful.

As She Climbed Across the Table was the first of his I read, so maybe that has something to do with it. I had a hard time getting into Amnesia Moon, Girl in Landscape, and even Fortress of Solitude, but I think everything he's written is worth checking out. Still, I think I tend to gravitate towards humorous Lethem more than straightfaced Lethem.

Hennessy
08-09-2007, 04:50 PM
I wont argue the fact that it was sorta cliche at times. But I still found it to be enjoyable and worthy of a library check-out.

Tell me. Have you read Jennifer Government yet? I haven't but plan to eventually.



After The Company, I've totally written off Maxx Barry. I've heard positive things about Jennifer Government, but that goes for all his work. I decided he's not my cup of tea, and I'm not real interested in working through is other works to try to find something to like, but that's just totally my opinion.

I will recommend Icelander. Fun worthwhile read, that was a pleasant surprise.

I'm reading George Saunders right now and highly recommend him.

Hennessy
08-09-2007, 04:55 PM
As for Jonathan Lethem-- avoid his new book. There's little to like and at the reading I was at he even said he kinda phoned it in. Which I almost applauded him for although he said that to a room of 75 people who bought the book and were trying to act at least enthused about it. After Fortress of Solitude he was wiped out and just needed to write something.
I loved Motherless Brooklyn, was disappointed at the unevenness of Fortress of Solitude and am hopeful to find something else of his to like.

spencerdidyrmom
11-16-2007, 12:27 PM
Just started reading Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell. I tried to start it up about 6 months ago but only got a few pages in. Now, I'm well into the 2nd part, Letters from Zedelghem. Not sure where its going, but its keeping my interest.

THWIP!
11-16-2007, 12:31 PM
I started reading The Abstinence Teacher by Tom Perrotta yesterday. It's pretty good so far. I like the way he writes and he knows his characters so well. Very impressive with his description of them.

glk
11-16-2007, 12:57 PM
As for Jonathan Lethem-- avoid his new book. There's little to like and at the reading I was at he even said he kinda phoned it in. Which I almost applauded him for although he said that to a room of 75 people who bought the book and were trying to act at least enthused about it. After Fortress of Solitude he was wiped out and just needed to write something.
I loved Motherless Brooklyn, was disappointed at the unevenness of Fortress of Solitude and am hopeful to find something else of his to like.

I can't get through Fortress, I've tried twice and made it about half way. It felt over-written to me. His new book just sounded awful so I didn't even check it out. But As She Climbed Across the Table, Gun With Occasional Music, and especially Motherless Brooklyn are all fantastic in my opinion.

Right now I'm reading Perdido Street Station by China Mieville and it's odd and wonderful.

tstouder
11-16-2007, 01:05 PM
I just finished a run of the first six books of The Dresden Files. was unsure of reading them based on the scifi short-lived series...but the books are great.
I need to hunt down the last 3 book in the run.

next on the reading pile is the new Preston/Childs book and the new Repairman Jack book.

Dusto
11-16-2007, 01:06 PM
I can't get through Fortress, I've tried twice and made it about half way. It felt over-written to me. His new book just sounded awful so I didn't even check it out. But As She Climbed Across the Table, Gun With Occasional Music, and especially Motherless Brooklyn are all fantastic in my opinion.

Right now I'm reading Perdido Street Station by China Mieville and it's odd and wonderful.

Agreed on all counts, except that I read PSS last year.

chazbot
11-16-2007, 02:01 PM
I'm about half through Carioca Fletch. I've been getting such a kick out of it and the first one. Hopefully I can work my way through all of the Fletch series.

Strikeout
11-16-2007, 02:03 PM
Just started Memoirs of a Geisha a couple days ago.

Pretty good read so far.

Shepherd
11-16-2007, 02:06 PM
Just finished Galapagos by Vonnegut on my way to work.

Next up is either Rant or The Road.

Good taste. Galapagos is one of my favorite Vonnegut novels.

I just finished Rant, and it was very good. A pleasant surprise after the amazingly mediocre Haunted.

R

Rosemary's Baby
11-16-2007, 02:19 PM
I just read Factotum for the first time. Amazing.

spencerdidyrmom
11-16-2007, 03:06 PM
I just read Factotum for the first time. Amazing.

Whatever you do, do NOT see the movie. Its appalling.

ChuckMcButcalf
11-16-2007, 03:15 PM
Right now I'm a few sections in to The Book of Guys by Garrison Keillor. I seriously love everything the man puts out.

chad2271
11-20-2007, 02:11 PM
about 40 pages in on 1984.

i know i suck. never read it.

but it's getting good so far.

just finished farewell my lovely by chandler. it was okay. didn't hit me as much as big sleep but still good. i may try one more chandler.

Generic Poster
11-20-2007, 02:21 PM
Finally reading Snow Crash.

Rosemary's Baby
11-20-2007, 02:37 PM
Whatever you do, do NOT see the movie. Its appalling.

I just saw it. I didn't see this post.

Holy shit, was that awful. Matt Dillon is so horrible in it. His delivery is unbearable. He should be ashamed.

sans serif
11-20-2007, 03:18 PM
I'm currently reading David Copperfield right now. It's good, but I need to stop reading right before I go to bed. I start dozing off in the middle of the chapter. Bah.

Buk Was Right
11-20-2007, 03:33 PM
Whatever you do, do NOT see the movie. Its appalling.

Appalling like it's a bad movie? Or appalling because it puts vision to horrible things in the book that previously only existed in your imagination?

Also, Post Office is another great Bukowski novel, but be warned that if you don't like your current job it might make you want to quit... that's what happened to me when I read it.