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View Full Version : So I'm allergic to my new puppy



Evan Wiener
07-03-2007, 07:46 AM
I've had significant allergies and mild asthma my whole life, at one point, using two inhalers and regular injections, but over the last few years, the allergies have subsided quite a bit, and I rarely used my inhaler, except when exercising. I am very allergic to cats, and mildly allergic to some dog breeds.

So my wife and I got a puppy that's an identical mix of breeds as my in-laws' dog. I've played with their dog, been to their house a lot, and watched him at our house for over a week while they were on vacation and didn't have any negative reaction. We thought both breeds (Maltese and Yorkshire Terrier) were hypo allergenic, thinking they barely shed at all and don't cause people with pet allergies problems.

Over the past couple of months (right around the same time as we got the dog), I've had a lot more allergy/asthma reactions, almost exclusively at night in our bedroom (haha - here come the jokes!). He sleeps with us in our bed, so I figured, based on the timing, I am allergic to the dog in some way, but really though it was that he rolls in the grass outside, and brings pollen into the house.

I have an appointment with an allergist next week to discuss this. I checked out their website and they claim that non-allergenic or hypo allergenic dogs are a myth:

Unfortunately, there are no "non-allergenic," or "hypoallergenic" breeds of cats or dogs. It is a myth that short haired animals are not allergenic. Although certain breeds may be more or less allergenic for some people, there are no "safe" furry pets if you are sensitive.

Pet dander comes from exposure to animal proteins found in the pet's skin, saliva, and urine. While the fur may be coated with proteins deposited from dried saliva, it is the dander that is the major source of pet allergen. Dander is the layer of dead skin, rich in animal protein, which is continuously shed. Sebaceous (oil producing) glands in the skin also produce these protein allergens. Male cats have, on average, greater amounts of sebaceous secretions and therefore are more allergenic than female or neutered male cats. This is a result of testosterone hormone effects on sebaceous glands.

Kind of a bummer, but we're obviously not giving up the dog. I guess we can make adjustments since I'm only highly allergic when in the bedroom (which he's been sleeping in). I tried new medications (Claritan, Claritan D, Zyrtec, generic Allergra) which have only limited effectiveness, so I guess I can also look into going back to allergy shots.

Anyone else allergic to their furry family members? :)

ClintP
07-03-2007, 07:48 AM
that sucks, and I am sorry to hear it. Maybe he will piss on your pillow and make it easier on you. I would give up anything for Ragweed to never exist. No, that is not the name of my dog!

nihilance
07-03-2007, 07:48 AM
You thought there were hypo-allergenic animals?

That's fucking hysterical.

Keith P.
07-03-2007, 07:49 AM
You thought there were hypo-allergenic animals?

That's fucking hysterical.

I laughed a bit at that too.

Generic Poster
07-03-2007, 07:51 AM
Maybe you're allergic to the dog's flea shampoo, just like when they thought Mr. Brady had become allergic to Tiger, but really it was the flea shampoo.

Keith P.
07-03-2007, 07:52 AM
Maybe you're allergic to the dog's flea shampoo, just like when they thought Mr. Brady had become allergic to Tiger, but really it was the flea shampoo.

And maybe, much like Mr. Brady, he is living a secret life of gloryholes, anonymous truck stop sex, and felching!



Wait..what were we talking about?

Generic Poster
07-03-2007, 07:54 AM
And maybe, much like Mr. Brady, he is living a secret life of gloryholes, anonymous truck stop sex, and felching!


That was a great episode - even better than the one where Mr. Brady caught that guy faking a neck injury in court!

Marc Lombardi
07-03-2007, 07:57 AM
I've had significant allergies and mild asthma my whole life, at one point, using two inhalers and regular injections, but over the last few years, the allergies have subsided quite a bit, and I rarely used my inhaler, except when exercising. I am very allergic to cats, and mildly allergic to some dog breeds.

So my wife and I got a puppy that's an identical mix of breeds as my in-laws' dog. I've played with their dog, been to their house a lot, and watched him at our house for over a week while they were on vacation and didn't have any negative reaction. We thought both breeds (Maltese and Yorkshire Terrier) were hypo allergenic, thinking they barely shed at all and don't cause people with pet allergies problems.

Over the past couple of months (right around the same time as we got the dog), I've had a lot more allergy/asthma reactions, almost exclusively at night in our bedroom (haha - here come the jokes!). He sleeps with us in our bed, so I figured, based on the timing, I am allergic to the dog in some way, but really though it was that he rolls in the grass outside, and brings pollen into the house.

I have an appointment with an allergist next week to discuss this. I checked out their website and they claim that non-allergenic or hypo allergenic dogs are a myth:

Unfortunately, there are no "non-allergenic," or "hypoallergenic" breeds of cats or dogs. It is a myth that short haired animals are not allergenic. Although certain breeds may be more or less allergenic for some people, there are no "safe" furry pets if you are sensitive.

Pet dander comes from exposure to animal proteins found in the pet's skin, saliva, and urine. While the fur may be coated with proteins deposited from dried saliva, it is the dander that is the major source of pet allergen. Dander is the layer of dead skin, rich in animal protein, which is continuously shed. Sebaceous (oil producing) glands in the skin also produce these protein allergens. Male cats have, on average, greater amounts of sebaceous secretions and therefore are more allergenic than female or neutered male cats. This is a result of testosterone hormone effects on sebaceous glands.

Kind of a bummer, but we're obviously not giving up the dog. I guess we can make adjustments since I'm only highly allergic when in the bedroom (which he's been sleeping in). I tried new medications (Claritan, Claritan D, Zyrtec, generic Allergra) which have only limited effectiveness, so I guess I can also look into going back to allergy shots.

Anyone else allergic to their furry family members? :)

I have cat allergies and Zyrtec was an almost instant cure for me -- plus I was using Flonase with it. You may want to ask your doctor about that.

I've since switched to Claratin & Flonase (due to my new health plan not covering Zyrtec) and I'm still fine.

Sorry to hear about the problems with the pup, though. I know that's tough.

nihilance
07-03-2007, 07:59 AM
I have cat allergies and Zyrtec was an almost instant cure for me -- plus I was using Flonase with it. You may want to ask your doctor about that.

I've since switched to Claratin & Flonase (due to my new health plan not covering Zyrtec) and I'm still fine.

Sorry to hear about the problems with the pup, though. I know that's tough.

Yeah...my dad has horrible hayfever and he swears by Flonase. It's not like the typical nose spray. It's actually some sort of steroid or something that fixes what ails you. Takes a week or so to really kick in, but after that you're gold.

Evan Wiener
07-03-2007, 08:02 AM
You thought there were hypo-allergenic animals?

That's fucking hysterical.

My doctor actually used that term and recycled the myth, and he has a yorkshire terrier, a breed he referred to as hypo allergenic. This is why I like my health insurance not requiring me to get referrals for a specialist.

I tried a Zyrtec sample, and it was only slightly effective. I'll talk to an allergist and see what they recommend. It's possible that having the dog sleep in his own bed (he does have a nice one we bought) will reduce my need to reach for the tissue box and inhaler at 4 AM.

dasNdanger
07-03-2007, 08:35 AM
Kind of a bummer, but we're obviously not giving up the dog. I guess we can make adjustments since I'm only highly allergic when in the bedroom (which he's been sleeping in). I tried new medications (Claritan, Claritan D, Zyrtec, generic Allergra) which have only limited effectiveness, so I guess I can also look into going back to allergy shots.

Anyone else allergic to their furry family members? :)

My husband has allergies, and had a dog as a kid. He was okay with it. But now, since he hasn't lived with dogs in 20 years, he has a reaction whenever we're at a friend's house that has dogs.

He is allergic to cats, and we have 4 indoor cats. His asthma flares up, but mostly in the winter when it's cold (cold and pollen also triggers his allergies - cats just top it off). But he manages quite nicely, even with several cats sleeping in bed with him.

His theory is that - after a while - he develops a tolerance to the animals. Not 'cured' - but not bad symptoms, either.

Best thing to cut down on allergic reactions:

1. Regular bath the dog. Perhaps have a professional groomer do this if you can afford it. If not - then it's up to your wife. :mrgreen:
2. Occasional wiping the dog down with a wet cloth (wife, not you).
3. Keep house well vaccumed - wife should do this when you're not around.
4. Keep pet bedding clean.
5. Keep pet out of bedroom.
6. If you MUST have the dog in the bedroom (like we must have our kitties), then give the dog his own bedding (that can easily be washed), and keep your bedding clean.
7. Air purifier, or - if you have central AC/heat - let the fan run to help filter out any dander in the air.
8. Look into products that help reduce the shedding of dander from your pet - like liquids that you put on their coats.

The vet, or perhaps stores like PetSmart, can help you pick out products to use. Once you get a good routine down, pet maintenance is second nature.

das

Evan Wiener
07-03-2007, 10:35 AM
My husband has allergies, and had a dog as a kid. He was okay with it. But now, since he hasn't lived with dogs in 20 years, he has a reaction whenever we're at a friend's house that has dogs.

He is allergic to cats, and we have 4 indoor cats. His asthma flares up, but mostly in the winter when it's cold (cold and pollen also triggers his allergies - cats just top it off). But he manages quite nicely, even with several cats sleeping in bed with him.

His theory is that - after a while - he develops a tolerance to the animals. Not 'cured' - but not bad symptoms, either.

Best thing to cut down on allergic reactions:

1. Regular bath the dog. Perhaps have a professional groomer do this if you can afford it. If not - then it's up to your wife. :mrgreen:
2. Occasional wiping the dog down with a wet cloth (wife, not you).
3. Keep house well vaccumed - wife should do this when you're not around.
4. Keep pet bedding clean.
5. Keep pet out of bedroom.
6. If you MUST have the dog in the bedroom (like we must have our kitties), then give the dog his own bedding (that can easily be washed), and keep your bedding clean.
7. Air purifier, or - if you have central AC/heat - let the fan run to help filter out any dander in the air.
8. Look into products that help reduce the shedding of dander from your pet - like liquids that you put on their coats.

The vet, or perhaps stores like PetSmart, can help you pick out products to use. Once you get a good routine down, pet maintenance is second nature.

das

Thanks for the tips!

My wife would sooner kick me out of the house than the dog. She made jokes that I could sleep on the floor. :no:

We have let his hair grow a bit too long, and will probably have it groomed shorter than the last time. He's a big furball now, and while it looks cute, it's clearly aggravating my allergies by retaining more dander.

We bathe him with shampoo every other week, but could probably step that up. I heard you shouldn't bathe them too much, because the shampoo could dry out their skin?

My wife wouldn't want him sleeping alone, so he'll probably wind up being trained to stay in his bed, and we'll gate off a part of the bedroom away from my side of the bed. And we'll have to look into a larger air purifier and the higher end filter for our central air unit.

Hopefully I can avoid regular injections for my allergies.

KarlH
07-03-2007, 10:47 AM
It isn't the hair, it's the saliva and dander. Every animal is unique that way. It isn't determined by breed or hair length but the individual animal. 1/100 cats does not have the protein in their saliva that makes people react that have cat allergies. There is a company in San Diego called Allerca that only breeds these cats, of course they run about $6-10k per kitten.

ClintP
07-03-2007, 10:48 AM
Das and Evan, you guys are hardcore. If I was allergic to animals like that own a pet would be far from my mind, much less 4 of them. Does your husband have some million dollar life insurance policy or something? If so, I see your plan and I must warn him!

ClintP
07-03-2007, 10:49 AM
It isn't the hair, it's the saliva and dander. Every animal is unique that way. It isn't determined by breed or hair length but the individual animal. 1/100 cats does not have the protein in their saliva that makes people react that have cat allergies. There is a company in San Diego called Allerca that only breeds these cats, of course they run about $6-10k per kitten.

:shock:

chrisfasowned
07-03-2007, 11:05 AM
i used to have a cat that, when we got it, caused me some pretty rough allergic reactions. however, as time passed i seemed to grow accustomed to the cat and eventually i had no allergic reactions to the cat. you may be able to build up a type of immunity. so, bury your face in the dog's belly and blow raspberries between hits on the inhaler and benadryl induced comas and you should be fine in a matter of weeks!

Bedlam66
07-03-2007, 11:07 AM
And maybe, much like Mr. Brady, he is living a secret life of gloryholes, anonymous truck stop sex, and felching!



Wait..what were we talking about?
Speaking of glory Holes, We're still on for next week right ?

Roman Noodles
07-03-2007, 11:08 AM
Awwww . . . that sucks man.

Evan Wiener
07-03-2007, 11:12 AM
Das and Evan, you guys are hardcore. If I was allergic to animals like that own a pet would be far from my mind, much less 4 of them. Does your husband have some million dollar life insurance policy or something? If so, I see your plan and I must warn him!

I'm only this allergic if I let him sleep in our bed, and when I sleep, it kicks in. Around the house, playing with him, having him rest on my lap while watching TV, I'm actually ok.

dasNdanger
07-03-2007, 01:14 PM
Das and Evan, you guys are hardcore. If I was allergic to animals like that own a pet would be far from my mind, much less 4 of them. Does your husband have some million dollar life insurance policy or something? If so, I see your plan and I must warn him!

You found me out! :twisted: Muahahahahaha!!

You gotta understand...Mr. Das is like Dr. Dolittle...he LOVES animals, and they love him. You should see him at night, in the bed, with a big 18-lb cat curled up in his arm next to him, little paws propped up on hubby's chest like he owns the guy...and another big furball or two sleeping in MY spot next to them. When I walk into the room, the cats look at me and say (with their eyes) "Don't EVEN think of sleeping here..."

So I don't. I end up our other room, falling asleep to TV (on a twin-sized 'captain's bed')...and then wake up at 3 am with 2 or 3 cats in bed with ME! Cats. :-? Bed whores, the lot of 'em....

das

Dr. Omega
07-03-2007, 02:41 PM
I had mild Asthma as a kid and have severe cat allergies and mild dog allergies. It all seems to depend on the dog. Some dogs of the same breed make me break out, some nothing at all.

I'm not so bad with my pups' fur, but if they play and chew on my hand, the saliva caused it to swell whereever the teeth touched.

It's not bad. I just go wash off in cold water when I am done playing and it is all good.

I don't let them sleep with me though. We were told by a trainer it is not a good idea, especially if you have dominance issues. They think it is THEIR bed and they let you sleep there. That kind of thing.

But yeah, their companionship and the laughs they cause far outweigh any allergies. I'd no sooner give up my dogs then I would cut off my arm.


Dr. Ω

Evan Wiener
07-06-2007, 04:57 AM
I had mild Asthma as a kid and have severe cat allergies and mild dog allergies. It all seems to depend on the dog. Some dogs of the same breed make me break out, some nothing at all.

I'm not so bad with my pups' fur, but if they play and chew on my hand, the saliva caused it to swell whereever the teeth touched.

It's not bad. I just go wash off in cold water when I am done playing and it is all good.

I don't let them sleep with me though. We were told by a trainer it is not a good idea, especially if you have dominance issues. They think it is THEIR bed and they let you sleep there. That kind of thing.

But yeah, their companionship and the laughs they cause far outweigh any allergies. I'd no sooner give up my dogs then I would cut off my arm.

Dr. Ω

So last night, Pixel wasn't crazy about being in his crate in our bedroom to sleep. He cried and barked and bit at the gate a little. He really got used to our bed in the 6 weeks we've had him. My allergies are just as bad as before, even after adding a $170 HEPA air purifier as they were without it (we left it running for the past 36 hours). I think I got 4-5 hours of sleep last night, between the barking and the sneezing/runny nose/itchy eyes and mild wheezing. My wife is pretty distraught, and worries we'd have to give him up (which I'm really not willing to do until I've exhausted every possible solution).

We're washing our bedding again and this time adding our comforter. I get a feeling that because he's gone about a month without a grooming haircut, all his dander is collecting in his very fluffy fur more than the first several weeks we got him, when it was shorter. That could be why I don't suffer these symptoms from a week of caring for my in-laws' dog, an identical mix of Maltese and Yorkie.

I have an allergist appointment first thing Monday, and hope that they can recommend other meds. My general doctor game me samples of Zyrtec (10 mg) to no effect, which may mean the dosage isn't enough? I've also tried generic Allegra (180 mg) which also hasn't helped, and Claritan D was hit or miss.

I'm hopeful that when he gets his hair trimmed, it will reduce the allergens he carries around, and alleviates my symptoms. Otherwise, we may be forced to keep him in his crate in the kitchen, where there's no carpeting. Unfortunately, he loves sleeping with us, but for my own health, it's time to be firm.

eroz
07-06-2007, 05:09 AM
Do you only put the puupy in the crate at bed time??

With my puppy, we put her in the crate a couple of times a day for about 1-2 hours at a time even though we are home with her. She barks maybe once or twice but quiets down when she finds her toy in there. She either takes a nap or she plays with her toy but she notices that she is not alone. When nighttime comes and she is exhausted she goes into her crate on her own. We have been doing this for the last 4 weeks and so far she only cried the first night we had her.

Evan Wiener
07-06-2007, 05:44 AM
He is crated in the mornings when we leave for work, and my in-laws pick him up around noon and he plays with their dog most afternoons.

We probably shouldn't allow him in our bedroom anymore (which is a shame, he loves it in there). He'll go in his crate for the Kong toy with treats (and Cheez-wiz like treat stuffing). Last night he hated sleeping in the crate in our bedroom.

It's hard, because dogs are so social, and most love curling up to you while sleeping. My wife will miss that aspect of having a dog. We'll try allergen reducing shampoo and bathe him tonight, and hope that along with washed bedding will help me. :(

nihilance
07-06-2007, 05:52 AM
It's hard, because dogs are so social, and most love curling up to you while sleeping. My wife will miss that aspect of having a dog. We'll try allergen reducing shampoo and bathe him tonight, and hope that along with washed bedding will help me. :(

I feel for you. My Shi Tzu follows me around all over the house and always hops up on the bed to snuggle next to me at night. It's like having the warmest, softest teddy bear in the world.

Evan Wiener
07-06-2007, 06:29 AM
I feel for you. My Shi Tzu follows me around all over the house and always hops up on the bed to snuggle next to me at night. It's like having the warmest, softest teddy bear in the world.

I'm willing to do whatever it takes to reduce my reaction, including pumping myself full of injections and meds, because as much as puppies are a handful, we really love the little guy. He's still too small to make the jump into our bed (as much as he tries), so it may be the only time we have to train him to stay off the bed and sleep away from us. It's a real shame, and really disappoints my wife, who pined for a dog and we waited years until we could afford one (and even then it was a week long debate before we decided to take the plunge). We thought for sure this breed (or mix of two breeds) would be ok with me, since I never had a reaction to Jake (my in-laws' dog).

I haven't had allergy/asthma related symptoms this frequently in many years. I feared my sensitivity to mold/dust would kill me when we moved into our 30 year-old house, but I haven't had a problem until now. The odd thing is, I'm sneezing like crazy today at the office!

DaGetHighKnight
07-06-2007, 07:03 AM
That sucks man. I use my dog as a pillow sometimes, Hey! maybe thats why i feel like shit!!