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S. Earl
07-02-2007, 10:37 PM
Lately I have been hearing alot about a classic Starman run from the early 90s. Podcasts and Boards seem to be mentioning it quite a bit, and I have never read it. Is it a modern classic? And what is the jist of the story?

Ben
07-02-2007, 10:38 PM
If you're referring to the non-Robinson Starman series, don't bother.

artimoff
07-02-2007, 10:46 PM
James Robinson's Starman ran 83 issues (0-81 & 1,000,000). There is also a 4 issue miniseries titled "The Shade". Most of it is in trade. Starman is also in Stars & stripe #0 & JSA #1-5.

The Hodag
07-02-2007, 11:21 PM
The gist of James Robinson's Starman is that it's a smart, character-centric superhero series about the son of the Golden Age Starman reluctantly taking on his father's role, but playing it his own way (no tights, more thinking outside the box). The son - Jack Knight - is kind of a hipster and runs a vintage collectibles shop, and the series actually makes the obsession over collecting one of its ancillary themes. But it's also about legacies and, especially, fathers and sons, with Jack and his father being particularly well-rounded characters. Robinson could veer a little arthouse, a little Tarantino (some great movie-talk in the series), and even a little pulp action. It's sorta like the superhero book for people who don't like (or don't think they like) superheroes.

It also had great art by Tony Harris.

And some of the best, quirkiest supporting characters in a superhero comic ever.

And a genuine ending.

It is absolutely worth seeking out. I think some or all of the trades are out of print now, but I suspect DC will remedy that soon-ish. If not...track the singles. You won't be sorry.

dEnny!
07-03-2007, 03:28 AM
You must rectify this situation. This is a great series. I picked it up because I remember Kevin Smith mentioning reading this series (sold some original pages a few years back) and a bunch of guys reading it back in the day on World Famous when it was still being published talking it up. I started out with the trades, but it doesn't collect all the "Times Past" issues so I bought all the issues too.

Evan Wiener
07-03-2007, 04:11 AM
The Starman series was the best thing that came out of the Zero Hour era of DC, and I think, really redefined how great DC comics could be if written well.

The series embraced DC's rich history and put a fresh coat of paint on the Golden Age DC characters with a story told from the perspective of a prodigal son who thinks spandex is ridiculous attire.

It really delved deep into the character of Ted Knight, the Golden Age Starman, and what it was really like in the WWII era. The story has probably the richest supporting cast I've seen in a superhero comic, and it's very accessible and find yourself immersed in. They also make great use of fill-in issues with stories of Times Past, which were often adventures of G.A. Starman, or other supporting characters, that added to the rich history of their town, Opal City. It would definitely be one of the comic series I'd take with me to the proverbial deserted island.

In addition to the Starman regular issues: 0-81, there were good annuals, and a special, and a story of his arch enemy in the Mist, an issue of a Girl Crazy 5th week event special, and a mini-series of the Shade, a former villain and ally, all of which are worth reading.

Ryan_ZOOM_Turner
07-03-2007, 04:16 AM
James Robinson's Starman is great.

charlie
07-03-2007, 04:39 AM
Adding on the "Starman is great!" sentiment. I really need to re-read these.

DAVE
07-03-2007, 05:02 AM
It's just a joy to read. The characters seem more real than almost any other in a superhero comic. These came out when I was young, and they really played a big role in the type of sophisicated storytelling that is now in comics.
The scenes resonate like a half dreamed memory from your favorite days.
Jake "Bobo" Bennetti and Jack Knight having a drink at a bar and talking about old time cool (Sharkskin suits and colorful tattoos) was quite possible the coolest thing ever captured on a comics page.
I always thought I was I was like Peter Parker, reading Starman you wish you were Jack Knight.
The fact that this isn't all readily available in trade from DC is a joke.

Sy-Klone
07-03-2007, 05:14 AM
I bought and read Starman in its entirety about six or seven months ago, and it quickly shot up to the top of my list of favorite series of all time. It's perfectly realized. It's incredibly moving. It's high adventure. It's old school, and yet it's incredibly fresh.

Above all, it's satisfying. You don't walk away from the series feeling like you've been cheated. You walk away feeling rewarded and with a smile on your face for having experienced it. Just a fantastic series and one I look forward to rereading in its entirety every now and again.

Track down the back issues. You can usually find lots of the entire series for around $80-100 or so on eBay, and it's well worth it. Highest possible recommendation.

TIP
07-03-2007, 05:34 AM
It's fucking fantastic.

T

Joshzilla
07-03-2007, 05:42 AM
It's mega-awesomeness. It really deserves even more praise than it gets.

The Dean
07-03-2007, 06:21 AM
Find these issues tout de suite! It's one of my favorite series of all time.

jason hissong
07-03-2007, 06:23 AM
i'm slowly piecing this together after gettting about half the issues for cheap on ebay. while my patience is wearing thin in trying to find all these issues, i've loved what i've read so far.

ERNIE_E
07-03-2007, 06:29 AM
Proud to say that I picked this up from Issue #0 and wanted it because of James Robinson's writing. If you want paper gold, find Golden Age too. Robinson was one of the best writers at that time period.

Starman's about a reluctant hero in a legacy of great crime fighters. There's a great sense of tradition, and a smart story. There's mystical and magic stuff here but very believable.

It's a very immersive involving series with the Shade's journals in the back of some of the issues, and the Time's Past yearly stories that are some of the most powerful.

This series also made me an instant Tony Harris fan and Ex Machina is the closest thing I've come to feeling like I have the complete Starman experience in today's comics.

ERNIE_E
07-03-2007, 06:30 AM
i'm slowly piecing this together after gettting about half the issues for cheap on ebay. while my patience is wearing thin in trying to find all these issues, i've loved what i've read so far.

Get what you can on Trade online in the various book and comic outlets like Midtown etc.

Then see what you need to fill in.

They really need to Absolute this sucker.

Dr. Omega
07-03-2007, 07:21 AM
I keep hearing of people never hearing of Starman till now and loving it later.

it is becoming the Firefly of the comic world..

And yes, Robinson's Starman is freaking AMAZING..

Dr. Ω

spencerdidyrmom
07-03-2007, 07:37 AM
A great series until they send Starman into space. That and the clusterfuck of Shade taking over the city completely derailed my interest in the series.

Doc Randy
07-03-2007, 08:13 AM
A great series until they send Starman into space. That and the clusterfuck of Shade taking over the city completely derailed my interest in the series.

I imagine that reading it in monthly installments must of been pretty rough.
If you read it in trade form, this isn't so bad. In fact, it actually pays off nicely in context of the larger story.

spencerdidyrmom
07-03-2007, 09:40 AM
I imagine that reading it in monthly installments must of been pretty rough.
If you read it in trade form, this isn't so bad. In fact, it actually pays off nicely in context of the larger story.

I did read it in trades. Last year. It was really good, but it jumped around way too much during those two aforementioned arcs. Plus, the characters got a little too cheeky and cute with each other for my personal taste.

Jef UK
07-03-2007, 09:57 AM
It's better than a hummer!

Roman Noodles
07-03-2007, 09:59 AM
Robinsons Starman was awesome.

YouStayClassy
07-03-2007, 10:04 AM
One of my favorite series ever.

I'll never understand why Robinson doesn't get more DC work (his unfortunate Batman OYL arc notwithstanding).

Bryan H
07-03-2007, 10:06 AM
My favorite comic series of all time.

I have a soft spot for #29, my first issue of the series, along with the first appearance of Bobo Benetti. Batman/Hellboy/Starman crossover was also some quirky awesomeness. And Starman One Million stands as my favorite forced-crossover-tie-in issue of any comic.

S. Earl
07-03-2007, 10:42 AM
Thanks for all the responses. I posted this last night and have not checked since, and I have 3 pages of praise. Looks like I will be hunting it down quick. I'm stoked. It has been a while since I found a new finite series to hunt down.

S. Earl
07-03-2007, 10:46 AM
Proud to say that I picked this up from Issue #0 and wanted it because of James Robinson's writing. If you want paper gold, find Golden Age too. Robinson was one of the best writers at that time period.

Starman's about a reluctant hero in a legacy of great crime fighters. There's a great sense of tradition, and a smart story. There's mystical and magic stuff here but very believable.

It's a very immersive involving series with the Shade's journals in the back of some of the issues, and the Time's Past yearly stories that are some of the most powerful.

This series also made me an instant Tony Harris fan and Ex Machina is the closest thing I've come to feeling like I have the complete Starman experience in today's comics.


Harris's art alone is worth hunting it down in my book. His work on Ex Machina blows my mind, and I often wonder why he isn't mentioned in the same breath as Hitch and Cassiday.

I bought the second issue of Golden age at a comic shop close out sale in Redding CA years ago. I need to get the rest of the series.

S. Earl
07-03-2007, 10:47 AM
One of my favorite series ever.

I'll never understand why Robinson doesn't get more DC work (his unfortunate Batman OYL arc notwithstanding).

Face the Face was okay.

If I recall, he wrote cable around the same time as Casey, with the Ladronn art. I found that to be the best Cable issues in the entire run.

YouStayClassy
07-03-2007, 10:49 AM
Face the Face was okay.

If I recall, he wrote cable around the same time as Casey, with the Ladronn art. I found that to be the best Cable issues in the entire run.

Robinson's Cable ranged from good to flat out amazing, but it was a little erratic compared to Starman (then again.... what isn't?).

Face The Face, I donno..... the fact the story was resolved in a back up irked the living hell out of me. And don't get me started on the return of Two-Face......

Masculine Todd
07-03-2007, 11:39 AM
I really need to pick this series up. I fail at teh comixxx!!!11

Generic Poster
07-03-2007, 11:45 AM
One of my favorite series ever.

I'll never understand why Robinson doesn't get more DC work (his unfortunate Batman OYL arc notwithstanding).

I think he could get as much work as he wanted. It's my understanding that he basically quit comics to go the screenwriter route.

YouStayClassy
07-03-2007, 11:46 AM
I think he could get as much work as he wanted. It's my understanding that he basically quit comics to go the screenwriter route.

*insert sarcastic League of Extraordinary Gentlemen comment here*

Generic Poster
07-03-2007, 11:49 AM
*insert sarcastic League of Extraordinary Gentlemen comment here*

*insert agreement with sarcastic comment; imply that perhaps he made the wrong decision*

TheTravis!
07-03-2007, 11:50 AM
I imagine that reading it in monthly installments must of been pretty rough.
If you read it in trade form, this isn't so bad. In fact, it actually pays off nicely in context of the larger story.

I DID read it in monthly installments. And I never stopped loving the series for even one minute.

YouStayClassy
07-03-2007, 11:51 AM
*insert agreement with sarcastic comment; imply that perhaps he made the wrong decision*

:lol:

I still rigidly maintain my "it was actually a different James Robinson that wrote that movie" stance.

Doc Randy
07-03-2007, 11:52 AM
I think he could get as much work as he wanted. It's my understanding that he basically quit comics to go the screenwriter route.

Last I talked to him, he was working on the set of Spider-Man 3. I assume he just does a bunch of on-set screenwriting and rewrites.

Generic Poster
07-03-2007, 11:54 AM
Last I talked to him, he was working on the set of Spider-Man 3. I assume he just does a bunch of on-set screenwriting and rewrites.

*insert sarcastic comment blaming Robinson for Spider-dance scene*

YouStayClassy
07-03-2007, 11:57 AM
*insert sarcastic comment blaming Robinson for Spider-dance scene*

:rofl:

TheTravis!
07-03-2007, 11:58 AM
Sometimes genius comic book writers aren't exactly genius filmmakers.

See also: Robocop 2

YouStayClassy
07-03-2007, 12:01 PM
Sometimes genius comic book writers aren't exactly genius filmmakers.

See also: Robocop 2

Sometimes they can though.

See: Man Of The House.



Oh wait.......:surrend:

Generic Poster
07-03-2007, 12:05 PM
Sometimes genius comic book writers aren't exactly genius filmmakers.

See also: Robocop 2

But then see Sin City!

But, yeah, it's hard to know how much of Robinson's real screenplay made it into the LOEG movie (same deal with with Robocop 2). I would like to think that Robinson realized that Tom Sawyer should've been well into his 50s by the time period of the movie.

kylethoreau
07-03-2007, 12:08 PM
I personally consider one of the greatest if not greatest mainstream title ever.


hell even when Harris left as artist I still loved it (took some getting used to though) and I hope that Robinson does someday return to him, since I remember someting along those lines possibly happening.

it's also the only superhero tattoo I'd ever consider getting

Martin J
07-03-2007, 05:39 PM
Absolutly loved the Starman series picked it up from the issue 27 recap issue and never looked back. If it wasnt for this series i would never have taken a second look at superheroes againl. I still think that is holds up as one of the best maxi series of all time with portents of what is to come present in all the issues right from the onset.

MJ

UltimateQuintessa
07-03-2007, 05:40 PM
Jack Knight in Dakota house all he wants to do is make you bounce.