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who cares?
02-13-2007, 05:08 PM
who was the first author to use the concept of robots becoming sentient?

i use to know a long time ago but i forgot for some reason


thank you to those more knowledgable whow are willing to share :-P

GelfXIII
02-13-2007, 05:11 PM
Mary Shelly

KingMob
02-13-2007, 05:14 PM
Mary Shelly


That's pretty good, I like your thinking on that one.

Andrew j
02-13-2007, 05:14 PM
Until someone gives you the correct answer go with Asimov. it's not right but you don't sound like a complete idiot saying it.

Andrew j
02-13-2007, 05:20 PM
Until someone gives you the correct answer go with Asimov. it's not right but you don't sound like a complete idiot saying it.

Or maybe you do. here's 10 seconds of work from me to you

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robots_in_fiction#19th_century_and_earlier

Taxman
02-13-2007, 05:25 PM
i use to know a long time ago but i forgot for some reasonWas it Čapek?

Am I wrong in thinking that Steven Spielberg would be willing to take credit for this?

GelfXIII
02-13-2007, 05:28 PM
I dunno, I still think Mary Shelly qualifies, but if you dont like her, you could look at some Hugo Gernsbach (sp?)

The Roman Candle
02-13-2007, 05:29 PM
Greek Myths.

Andrew j
02-13-2007, 05:31 PM
Be awesome and say Robert Kanigher

monkeyboy
02-13-2007, 05:32 PM
i would still have to go with Asimov. Not because of the crappy as hell Will Smith movie, but i believe some of his early I ROBOT stories, which there were several of, covered that.

Taxman
02-13-2007, 05:38 PM
i would still have to go with Asimov. Not because of the crappy as hell Will Smith movie, but i believe some of his early I ROBOT stories, which there were several of, covered that.Asimov certainly lays the groundwork for almost all incarnations of robots in science fiction that followed him, but Čapek actually invented the robot. Asimov may not have been able to write his robot works if Čapek had not come before.

Did Mary Shelly actually write of mechanical creations, or do we refer only the Frankenstein? And an the subject of Shelly, had anyone here ever read The Last Man?

Taxman
02-13-2007, 05:48 PM
I guess there was some Frenchie named Auguste Villiers de l'Isle-Adam who wrote of a character he called and "android" which predated Čapek.

I think the proper progression may be:

Shelly
l'Isle-Adam
Čapek
Asimov

The Roman Candle
02-13-2007, 05:48 PM
Asimov certainly lays the groundwork for almost all incarnations of robots in science fiction that followed him, but Čapek actually invented the robot. Asimov may not have been able to write his robot works if Čapek had not come before.

Did Mary Shelly actually write of mechanical creations, or do we refer only the Frankenstein? And an the subject of Shelly, had anyone here ever read The Last Man?

The idea that the Frankenstein monster was made from dead human parts is a creation of James Whale. In the book, it says only that Frankenstein created a man, it does not say how.

Dusto
02-13-2007, 05:52 PM
Taxman: I've read The Last Man. What's it to you?

Dark Sasha
02-13-2007, 06:04 PM
Shelly for sure. But what about the Jewish Golem myth?

xyzzy
02-13-2007, 06:07 PM
Shelly for sure. But what about the Jewish Golem myth?

I don't think the Golem was ever sentient, was it?

Frankenstein and R.U.R. are the main candidates, I think. You can start talking about stuff like the Golem, or, hell, the Gingerbread Man, but I don't think that they really capture the contemprary idea of a robot.

Matthew Brown
02-13-2007, 06:10 PM
What about the Greek myths about Hephaestus having metal servants?

Taxman
02-13-2007, 06:25 PM
Taxman: I've read The Last Man. What's it to you?I was kinda curious about it. I've looked for it at the library, but can't get it. I was wondering who it was, whether it was worth my reading.

Dusto
02-14-2007, 05:57 AM
It's pretty strange. I read it in a class. I thought it was a little slow-going at times, but I know a lot of people loved it. It's about a plague that wipes out a bunch of people in the "future" (though it doesn't focus much on how this future is different from the early 1800's) and other stuff that happens, until there's just one guy left.

WinterRose
02-14-2007, 08:22 PM
You folks may want to include Fritz Lang in there somewhere if you're looking for the modern interpretation of the android theme. And while Frankenstein is an interesting suggestion... Well, Miss Mary may have actually been the first if you take to the definition 'An artificial construction made to do the labors of a man.'

Asimov certainly seemed to think so. He even coined the term 'The Frankenstein Complex' concerning the common plotline of robots going berzerk and eventually turning on their owners for the presumption of having tried to create life in the face of their own 'creators' whoever those might have been.

That said, the Pygmalion myth may come the closest, where you get the statue Galatea given life by Aphrodite. Tho there are all manner of mythological created beings that could technically fit the bill, having been created by some mage or deity. Blodouedd, Adam & Eve... all three, CREATED beings.

But yeah. The earliest recollection I have of the modern vision of your actual robot, android or gynoid with any form of self determination might have been that of Hel from Fritz Lang's 'Metropolis'. Developing her own individuality, Hel goes on a tear through Metropolis, inciting riots, craving bloodshed, and generally causing as much chaos as she possibly could. Perhaps in vengeance upon Joseph Freder (The Mayor) or her creator Rotwang (Mad Scientist. WHAT A NAME!!) for having dared to create her in the first place. Or clothing her in the image of our hero's true love, Maria.

The Frankenstein Complex, as Asimov defines it seems to collide with the uncanny valley effect when Rotwang shows J.Freder the prototype Hel Robot.

Rotwang: "Now all she needs is a soul!!"
Freder: "You're mistaken... it's better off without one."

Organic Supremecist Bastards!

"In our arrogance, we decided we create life. Well now our punishment is that we HAVE created!"
-Mary Wollstonecraft-Shelley, 'Gothic'

Frozen Sooner
02-14-2007, 08:27 PM
I don't think the Golem was ever sentient, was it?

Frankenstein and R.U.R. are the main candidates, I think. You can start talking about stuff like the Golem, or, hell, the Gingerbread Man, but I don't think that they really capture the contemprary idea of a robot.

I don't know if the Golem was ever self-aware, but it certainly became self-directed. That was going to be my entry as well.

Capcek is certainly a good answer as well.